Archive for the ‘srt’ Tag

50 Years of Charger: Part 5 of 5 | The 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968, 1969, 1970 and 2006 Dodge Charger. Today, in our final blog post in the series, we’re focusing on the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat: Interior, Exterior and Engine

Inside and outside, the 2016 Dodge SRT® Hellcat is a sight to behold — if you can catch a glimpse of it racing by, that is. From the sporty, refined interior to the supercharged 6.2L HEMI® SRT Hellcat V8 engine, every detail of this road warrior is designed for comfort and performance.

Even at a standstill, the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat looks like it’s ready to sprint from the line. The SRT Hellcat front fender badging puts the competition on notice, and the aluminum hood featuring air extractors astride a center NACA duct is both functional for cooling and bold in style.

In addition, the 20×9.5-inch forged aluminum slingshot wheels in standard Matte Black or available Brass Monkey finish exude speed. For muscle car enthusiasts who truly want to stand apart from the crowd, optional SRT Hellcat dual racing stripes add an aggressive appearance to an already intimidating vehicle.

If you thought the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat looked like a beast on wheels, just wait until you feel the power under the hood. The supercharged 6.2L HEMI V8 pushes muscle to its very limit, exerting a monstrous 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque. All of that power is routed to the rear wheels via a TorqueFlite® eight-speed automatic transmission that’s been enhanced with additional pinion gears and five additional clutch pack discs.

To harness all that power, the Charger SRT Hellcat features performance-tuned steering to give the driver good vehicle response and increased ease of maneuverability in tight spaces. Further, the three-mode Bilstein® adaptive dampening suspension works to put the driver in full control no matter the conditions. The Brembo® ultra high-performance brake system boasts monster-sized 15.4-inch two-piece rotors that work with six-piston calipers on the front, and 13.8-inch rear discs for incredible stopping power.

For those who believe driving can be an art form, the interior of the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat has been designed for comfort and style, with dark satin accents, and engineered for road-ready confidence and control. The SRT flat-bottom steering wheel with gunmetal accents is designed to fit firmly in the palms of your hands, and the 7-inch customizable driver information digital cluster display delivers real-time information. To flex some serious muscle on the interior, the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat features a 200-mph speedometer.

The 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat: Keyfobs and Safety & Security Features

Speaking of high speeds and harnessing power, the 2016 Dodge SRT® Hellcat comes with two key fobs — a black key fob that restricts power to 500 horsepower and a red key fob that unlocks the full 707 horsepower of the supercharged 6.2L HEMI® SRT Hellcat V8 engine.

Safety and security features include the ParkView® rear back up camera*, ParkSense® rear park assist system, and suite of standard airbags†, including advanced multistage driver and front-passenger airbags, supplemental full-length side-curtain airbags, front seat-mounted side pelvic thorax airbags and a driver-side knee blocker airbag.

Power, performance, style — after 50 years of the Charger, the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat still represents the principles of the original and continues to define the muscle sedan. We can’t wait to see what the next 50 years of Charger brings.

Learn more about the history of the Dodge Charger at the Redline Dodge Blog, and check out the current lineup at dodge.com.

Read more at: https://blog.dodge.com/heritage/50-years-dodge-charger-2016/

Does the TRX presage a Jeep Trackhawk Hellcat?

The Ram TRX is the first publicly-shown vehicle that hooks up the Hellcat engine to a four wheel drive system. It dropped down to 575 hp, but that’s a hundred horsepower more than the 6.4 Hemi and even further above the Ford Raptor.

A Hellcat-powered Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk has been rumored since before the Hellcat was even shown to the public. Insiders said that FCA leaders were concerned the engine be too loud or uncouth for the refined Grand Cherokee, and that the cost would be too high.

The supercharged Hemi turned out to be relatively quiet, and easily controllable — surprisingly so, in fact. It might be hard to whip it around corners at speed in the big Jeep, but at least it’ll be possible to drive it gently.

That left durability, and the TRX is our first look at how that’s being handled. Dialed down to 575 horsepower, it seems to be compatible with many factory parts. The differentials are possible issues; so is the full time AWD transfer case. The TRX uses a part-time Borg-Warner 44-45; there is a full-time B-W 44-44, but Jeep already uses the formerly-New-Venture-now-Magna MP3010 on its SRT. Can full time four wheel drive work with 575 horsepower, while still fitting into the Grand Cherokee?

There are still many questions, but sources have told Allpar that there are Grand Cherokee Hellcat mules running around, and that the Hellcat would be detuned for the purpose. Whether they turn out to be “commercial” — practical for commercial sale — is still up in the air. See the Ram 1500 Rebel TRX.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/2016/10/does-the-trx-presage-a-jeep-trackhawk-hellcat-34120

Is this the Dodge Durango SRT?

There are no official images of the ever-popular-but-still-rumored Dodge Durango SRT; however, when Allpar’s suzq044 created this rendering, an inside source said it was “very accurate.”

Here is a quick rundown compared to the already sporty Durango R/T:

– The front fascia is similar to the 2017 SRT Jeep, including a large lower-central grille opening flanked by two smaller vents and a long opening along the bottom.
– The upper grille opening has swapped out the crosshairs for the same style mesh as the lower grille opening; the SRT badge has been added to about the same place as it is in the SRT Charger and Challenger.
– The hood has a Hellcat-inspired design, with a front scoop like the Hellcat hoods and two vents from the Jeep SRT.
– This SRT Durango rendering has a far more aggressive stance than any current Durango, requiring a unique suspension tune.
– The wheels are from the Challenger Scat Pack.

The artist changed the front fascia, the upper grille, the hood, the wheels and lowered it a bit, creating what I have been told is an accurate depiction of the upcoming SRT Durango. The fact that so few items have been changed to create such an aggressive looking, high-performance SUV is a testament to just how sporty this big SUV is in its “normal” form.

Still, there are a few features of this SRT Durango rendering which I don’t expect to see on the production model. Mostly, I don’t expect so much Hellcat inspiration in the hood, so scratch the “Hellcat scoop.” I also don’t think that Dodge will use Scat Pack wheels, but I do expect to see something far sportier than the Durango R/T wheels. Finally, I don’t know that we will see a factory SRT Durango that sits quite this low to the ground.

In addition to the 392 cubic inch engine and the unique trim, the SRT Durango will surely have a set of Brembo brakes, lightweight wheels wrapped in high performance tires, and an interior with plenty of logos when it hits dealerships.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/2016/09/very-accurate-srt-durango-rendering-33563

50 Years of Charger: Part 4 of 5 | The 2006 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968, 1969 and 1970 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 2006 Charger, with one final blog post to follow on the 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 2006 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

Following a nearly two-decade hiatus, Dodge Charger roared back onto American roadways in 2006. This sixth-generation model took cues from its forbearers of the muscle car era, and put a modern spin on the iconic nameplate. The Dodge Charger, in its first year back on the blacktop, was available in SE, SXT, R/T, R/T with Road/Track Performance Group, Daytona R/T and SRT8 versions.

The true excitement of the 2006 Dodge Charger is that the muscle car giant returned with a focus on power and performance. The SXT model came equipped with a 3.5L V6 engine, 5-speed automatic transmission with AutoStick® manual shifting feature, all-speed traction control, as well as ABS and electronic stability control.

The 2006 Charger also saw the introduction of all-wheel drive. Additional power was available with the Charger R/T, which packed the punch of a 340-horsepower 5.7L HEMI® V8 mated to a 5-speed automatic transmission. And at the top of the line, the 2006 Charger SRT8 flew off the line with a 425-horsepower 6.1L HEMI® V8 engine.

For its part, the 2006 Dodge Charger Daytona R/T was equipped with a high-output version of 5.7L HEMI V8 engine that boasted 350 horsepower, a retro HEMI decal on the hood and Daytona decals on the rear fenders. The Daytona R/T also included a special front fascia with a chin spoiler and a black rear spoiler.

The exterior appearance of the 2006 Dodge Charger paid homage to the past with reminiscent stamped hood and side panels, and brought its own unique style as a four-door sedan. The SRT8 version featured exterior upgrades such as a special grille, rear spoiler, front fascia and engine cover, larger exhaust tips, and unique colors and exterior trim.

The modern interior of the 2006 Dodge Charger was designed for comfort and loaded with technology. Features included air conditioning, CD player, tilt and telescoping steering column, remote keyless entry and power locks, mirrors and windows. The SRT8 took the interior and technology to yet another level, with standard and optional features including heated front seats with perforated suede inserts, automatic climate control, a performance steering gear, power-adjustable pedals, GPS navigation system, 322-watt audio system, sunroof, rear-seat DVD entertainment system and body-color interior trim.

From highways to racetracks (in 2006, the Dodge Charger silhouette design returned to stock car racing) the 2006 Dodge Charger claimed its place at the top of the muscle car scene. Since then, for the past decade, there’s been no looking back.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-2006/

2017 Dodge Charger Hellcat

The newest reiteration of the Dodge Charger Hellcat is here, and it’s ready to give you the ride of a lifetime! With its classic design, powerful performance, and feature-packed interior, expect to fall in love with this full-size sedan from the moment you take the wheel. Here at Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram and Dick Scott Motor Mall, we have the 2017 Dodge Charger Hellcat for sale and our team can’t wait to show you this one-of-a-kind vehicle!

There is plenty of power surging through the 2017 Charger Hellcat. Boasting a 3.6L V6 powertrain, your performance is taken beyond limits with 292 horsepower and 262 lb.-ft. of torque. The impressive powertrain line-up continues with the 5.7L V8 HEMI® and the 6.4L V8 HEMI® powerhouses. The first rewards you with 370 horsepower and 395 lb.-ft. of torque, while the second engine choice takes you to the next level with its 485 horsepower and 475 lb.-ft. of torque. For the ultimate ride, the beastly 6.2L V8 HEMI® powertrain cranks up to 707 horsepower and 650 lb.-ft. of torque. When equipped with the 8-speed TorqueFlite® automatic transmission, you’ll be able to ride with optimal precision and swiftness.

You’ll have onlookers stop in their tracks when you’re behind the wheel of the 2017 Dodge Charger Hellcat due to its commanding presence and bold style. Its athletic frame and carefully-sculpted profile lines highlight the distinct grille, while the aggressive stance of the Charger Hellcat makes for an unforgettable entrance. Made with new lightweight materials, the 2017 Charger Hellcat not only looks sleek and modern, but is able to ride with more agility and control. Eye-catching features like LED headlights and an available rear spoiler allow the Charger Hellcat to stand out in the crowd.

An array of amenities welcome you to relax and set your mind at ease once you’re inside the new Dodge Charger Hellcat. With its driver-centric cockpit loaded with features like a multi-information display, USB ports1, and more, you’ll be prepared for anything that’s in store on the road ahead. The soft-to-the-touch cloth-trimmed seats keep you comfortable throughout the whole ride. However, if you desire more luxury, select the leather-appointed seats to enhance your cabin’s sporty flair.

Here at Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in Plymouth and Dick Scott Motor Mall in Fowlerville, your local Dodge dealers, we now have the 2017 Dodge Charger Hellcat! Visit http://www.DickScott.com or stop by our showroom to learn more about this exciting, new vehicle!

How big will the next Dodge Charger be?

Back in 1960, Chrysler Corporation converted almost its entire product line from body-on-frame to unibody (still using subframes). The revolutionary change could have frightened customers off, as the Airflow did, despite extensive testing.

The company’s leaders thought they could prevent customer resistance by making the cars look fairly similar to the 1959s, a successful strategy. They were lighter and handled better, and that’s all most customers noticed. Chrysler could have made major changes to the styling to call attention to the change, but chose not to.

That made a comment by reliable source oh2o especially interesting: he wrote that the next-generation Charger would be about the size it is today. Most sources have claimed that the Charger would be shrinking to differentiate it more from the 300.

This goes along with yet-unconfirmed rumors that Chrysler might make a large front wheel drive car — a niche flagship which, thanks to shared engineering and a shared plant with the Pacifica, would not need to sell in large numbers to make a profit. The Chrysler could be even larger inside, perhaps sacrificing the V8 for a six, turbocharged or not.

The Charger would stay a muscle car, keeping its size and successful market niche, but with higher gas mileage, better acceleration with its standard engines, and better handling.

As for running against Mustangs and Camaros, there’s no reason for the Charger to do that anyway — now that we have the Dodge Challenger. Indeed, when the original Dodge Charger was made, it was not aimed at the Mustang or Camaro; that was the job of the Plymouth Barracuda (joined in 1970 by the Dodge Challenger and Plymouth Duster).

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/2016/05/how-big-will-the-next-dodge-charger-be-31783

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk: More Off-Road Prowess for the Grandest Jeep

Jeep first introduced the Trailhawk name on a Grand Cherokee concept in 2012, whipped up for that year’s Easter Jeep Safari fan event in Moab, Utah. In the years since, Jeep briefly introduced an off-road-oriented Grand Cherokee Trailhawk model for the 2013 model year but quietly removed it from the lineup after the Grand Cherokee’s 2014 facelift, transferring the Trailhawk name to trim levels on the smaller Cherokee and Renegade. Due this summer as a 2017 model, the Grand Cherokee Trailhawk follows the formula laid down by that concept of many years ago and codified by the production Grand Cherokee, Cherokee, and Renegade variants, adding more off-road capability and butchier looks.

The Trailhawk joins the Grand Cherokee family as that SUV’s sixth trim level next to the existing Laredo, Limited, Overland, SRT, and the freshly revised Summit. (It is, we must point out, distinct from the 707-hp, Hellcat-powered Grand Cherokee SRT Trackhawk that arrives next year.) Standard is Jeep’s Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive setup—the hardest-core version available in the Grand Cherokee, which can also be had with rear-wheel drive or Quadra-Trac I, an all-wheel-drive system that lacks low-range gearing. Other standard features include an electronic limited-slip rear differential, Hill Ascent/Descent control, skid plates, and 18-inch Kevlar-reinforced Goodyear Adventure tires. The adjustable air suspension optional on other Grand Cherokees is also included, albeit modified for an extra 0.4 inch of ground clearance in its tallest setting (for a total of 10.8 inches), and Trailhawk-signature red-painted tow hooks poke from the Grand Cherokee’s bumpers. Jeep will offer this Trailhawk with either the Grand Cherokee’s standard 3.6-liter V-6 engine or its optional Hemi V-8, but not with the diesel engine offered on other models.

Jeep further distinguishes the Trailhawk with gray-painted door mirrors and a matching gray roof rack, a matte-black hood decal, and red-hued “Trail-Rated” badging. Buyers can choose from Redline Red, Billet Silver, Bright White, Rhino, Granite Crystal, Velvet Red, and Diamond Black paint. Inside, the seats are covered in black leather and microsuede with red stitching, and the dashboard features piano-black and gunmetal-colored trim. There also is a Trailhawk badge on the steering wheel and a standard 8.4-inch touchscreen with Chrysler’s Uconnect infotainment platform and special displays for the suspension settings, wheel articulation, and more. Optional extras include 20-inch wheels and Mopar rock rails for protecting the Grand Cherokee’s rocker panels from pesky boulder impacts. Pricing for the resurrected Grand Cherokee Trailhawk hasn’t yet been announced, but expect it to live in the middle of the Grand Cherokee lineup.

Read more at: http://blog.caranddriver.com/2017-jeep-grand-cherokee-trailhawk-more-off-road-prowess-for-the-grandest-jeep/

What exactly is the Hurricane engine?

Speculation/analysis. Last week, Allpar was the first to show one of the Hurricane prototype engines. It is a turbocharged two-liter, according to various reports; scuttlebutt had the goal at 300 horsepower or so for an SRT version, and the mid-200s for a standard model.

Alfa Romeo recently announced its two-liter four would hit 276 horsepower, but other than taking full credit for its development, said nothing about its origins. If it were based on the 1.75 liter engine they already have, we would expect them to say it, so we suspect they are using some version of the Hurricane.

Normally, it would seem that the Hurricane was an updated, turbocharged version of the current “World Engine,” but Bob Lees’ 2014 presentation included an image of a future four-cylinder engine family, to be made in two sizes, for the entire company: Fiat, Dodge, Chrysler, Jeep, and Alfa Romeo (Maserati seems unlikely to use it).

Some of these technologies are being explored by Chrysler, such as the belt-starter alternator, stop-start system, cooled EGR, integrated manifold, and variable-displacement oil pump. MultiAir is from Fiat, and direct injection probably draws on Fiat’s expertise as well. The Alfa Romeo engine uses MultiAir and direct injection.

It’s possible that this will be the first appearance of the new engine family, which would, among other things, explain why the Alfa Romeo Giulia is taking so long to arrive.

It’s also possible that they are building on the existing Chrysler 2-liter engine and past work on trying to make a Dart SRT4. Alfa Romeo would have to do their own tuning and engineering, partly because the SRT engine would be built to a lower cost budget, partly because they have different goals.

Regardless, for marketing reasons, expect any new engine to show up as an Alfa Romeo first — because no premium car owner wants a mass-market engine under the hood. Since mass-market car buyers don’t mind high-end engines, even if Auburn Hills had done all the work on the new engine series (which they almost certainly have not), it would still be credited to Alfa Romeo.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/11/what-exactly-irricane-engine-30625

What will be the next Hellcat?

The 707-horsepower Hellcat engine, a supercharged 6.2 liter Hemi V8, has rewarded Dodge with much higher sales than expected, along with a great deal of publicity in both magazines and social media.

The engine, carefully set up so that it can be run “all day” at the track on hot summer days — unlike at least one competitive Camaro — seems to be a real winner, but it’s available only in two cars, the closely related Challenger and Charger. In the Challenger, buyers can get a manual or automatic; in the Charger, it’s all automatic, but that automatic responds far more quickly than even a well-trained human can.

As Chrysler and its suppliers work to boost production of the Hellcat engine (particularly the unique supercharger), the next question becomes, “Which car is next?”

There are two real possibilities, both of which have been rumored: the Ram 1500 and the Jeep Grand Cherokee. The Jeep is the more credible choice, because the Grand Cherokee SRT has been a hit — and has been able to command a higher price than most FCA US cars. In addition, the suspension has already been tuned for performance with the 392 engine, which puts out 485 horsepower.

Jeep Grand Cherokee is a worldwide seller, and a Hellcat version would certainly be relatively popular in parts of the world where Rams are rare if available at all.

Ram, on the other hand, would be much harder to performance-tune; engineers would be starting from scratch, rather than building on work already done. Packaging might be easier, but would it sell more normal Rams, the way a Grand Cherokee Hellcat would sell more of the 6.4 SRTs?

All indicators, and our own long ears, are that the next Hellcat will be a Grand Cherokee. There’s no point in waiting for it to come out this year, though — demand for the hot engine means that it’ll be restricted to large cars for the moment, simply because orders exceed supply.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/07/what-will-be-the-next-hellcat-29268

The 1,000HP Gen III Hemi 1970 Dodge Challenger Dream Car

For some, Super Stock and “Super Stalk” might as well be one in the same. For others however, both are distinctly different, yet equally heroic endeavors. In NHRA Super Stock, the Big Three dumped ludicrous stacks of money to build factory ringers for bragging rights and bragging rights alone. This results in cool stuff like 9,000-rpm hydraulic roller small-blocks that run 9-second e.t.’s. By contrast, “super stalk” describes one man’s quest to chase down the exact same car for 30 years before finally convincing the owner to put it up for sale. It takes a very unique car to inspire such an extreme obsession, and the story behind Brook Niemi’s ’70 Dodge Challenger proves that the truth is indeed much more interesting than fiction.

Although people love reminiscing about how everything was better during the muscle car era, they rarely mention that it was also a time when real car guys worked at car dealerships. Imagine, for a moment, the luxury of ordering up the Mopar of your dreams with an employee discount to boot. Throw in a savvy employee’s knowledge of all the obscure option codes offered by Chrysler, and Brook’s Challenger is the result. “The original owner was a Dodge salesman in Great Falls, Montana, who ordered it as a company car,” Brook explains. “The dealership didn’t allow optioning company cars with Hemis or Six Pack induction systems, so he ordered it up with the R/T package, 440 big-block, a four-barrel carb, an A833 four-speed, and a Dana 60 rearend. Once the car arrived, he swapped out the four-barrel carb and the stock hood for a Six Pack and a factory T/A hood. The car was also optioned with the Special Edition package, which included a smaller back window, four-point seatbelts, and a console in the headliner.”

Eventually, the unique E-Body moved on to its second owner a few years later, which is when Brook first saw it and fell head over heels. “During high school in the late ’70s, the machine shop I was working at built a 500ci Six Pack engine for the Challenger. At that time it was painted white and built to look like the car from Vanishing Point,” he recalls. “I have such vivid memories of the owner pulling wheelies with the car in the parking lot. From that day forward, I always kept up with the car. The third owner purchased the car in the early ’80s and never drove it much.”

The bad news was that the Challenger’s third owner seemed to appreciate it more for its collectability than its Chevy-stomping potential. The good news was that this same lack of use kept the car in outstanding condition. “From the early ’80s to 2005, the car sat in storage. The owner at the time liked that the Challenger was one of less than 150 built with a 440 and a four-speed, but his real passion was for ’60s-era cars,” Brook says. “He planned on restoring the car back to stock someday, but he eventually had a change of heart and decided to sell it to help fund other projects. He had been sitting on my contact information for years, so as soon as I got the call that the car was available, I picked it up immediately.”

Throughout the course of its decorated history, this fine Mopar specimen had logged just 54,000 original miles. Even so, the 30-year-old paint had seen better days, so Brook stripped the car down, repainted it, and dropped the original 440 back in it. While the crew at Kindig-It Design tackled the paint and bodywork, the car revealed yet another one of its interesting secrets. “The paint code indicated that the car was originally Sublime Green. Since that made it even rarer, the shop tried to talk me into painting it the original OE color,” Brook recalls. “I understood the reasoning behind it, but in my mind the car had to be white because that’s the color it was when I first saw it as a kid. I always remembered it as a Vanishing Point tribute car, so that’s how I planned on restoring it.”

By sticking with his guns, Brook successfully re-created the car from his childhood dreams. All was good in his hood until a chance encounter with another Mopar triggered an avalanche of changes. “I was sitting at a stoplight one day when a Sublime Green Challenger R/T with a 426 Hemi pulled up behind me. It looked so good that even though I had just finished painting my car white, I decided at that moment that I had to repaint it green,” Brook says. On one hand, stripping the car back down just to repaint it seemed like an awful lot of work, and Brook was tempted to modernize the powertrain, suspension, and brakes. On the other hand, he had some reservations about throwing a bunch of non-original parts on such a rare piece of Mopar history. Ultimately, the itch to build something truly unique prevailed.

Seeking modern levels of power, driveability, braking, handling, and comfort in a 40-year-old chassis required a major overhaul of all the major mechanical hardware. Granted, a stock 440 provides plenty of scoot by most standards, but Brook wanted more power. Like three times more power. He determined that the best method of accomplishing this without increasing mass was by swapping out the big-block for a supercharged, all-aluminum Gen III Hemi. Absolute Performance (Sandy, Utah) welcomed the challenge and schemed up the perfect combination for Brook’s needs. The setup is based on an aftermarket aluminum block that’s been bored to 4.125 inches and fitted with a Callies forged 4.000-inch crankshaft, Oliver steel rods, and custom Wiseco 9.5:1 forged pistons. An Edelbrock E-Force supercharger pressurizes air molecules into a set of Thitek aluminum cylinder heads, and custom Arrow Lane headers evacuate the cylinders. The result is 426 ci of Gen III Hemi that kicks out over 1,000 hp and 1,100 lb-ft of torque. For easier freeway cruising, Brook replaced the A833 trans for a Tremec TKO 600 five-speed, which feeds torque to a Strange S60 rearend.

Of course, horsepower alone is meaningless if it all goes up in smoke, so Brook completely revamped the chassis with Reilly Motorsports hardware. Up front, the stock suspension has been replaced with an RMS K-member, control arms, sway bar, and coilovers. Out back, the factory leaf springs got yanked for an RMS four-link system. Monster Wilwood disc brakes convert forward inertia into heat, while 18-inch EVOD wheels wrapped in Nitto rubber plant the lateral and longitudinal loads to the pavement.

Inevitably, some collectors won’t take too kindly to throwing a late-model EFI motor along with modern suspension and brakes at a super rare Challenger with only 54,000 original miles. Nevertheless, from the car’s original interior to its stock body and paint, Brook has gone to great lengths to retain the essence of what the Challenger looked like when it rolled into the dealer lot in 1970. “Sure, I had some reservations about putting a bunch of modern parts on this car, but I’ve put the original engine, rearend, K-member, and suspension into safe storage. I can swap all the original parts back in very easily,” he explains.

Ultimately, Brook doesn’t have to explain himself to anyone. After patiently stalking his prey for 30 years, he’s earned the right to do whatever he wants, period correctness be damned. Despite how utterly badass Brook’s 1,000hp Challenger may be, its cool factor still takes a backseat to the incredible story behind it. Lusting over the same car for three decades, then transforming it into the ultimate E-Body, could just be the most rewarding car building experience of all time. As the saying goes, you can’t make this stuff up.

Fast Facts
1970 Dodge Challenger
Brook Niemi
South Jordan, UT

Engine

Type: Chrysler Gen III Hemi small-block

Block: Mopar Performance aluminum bored to 4.125 inches

Oiling: Melling oil pump, Milodon pan

Rotating assembly: Callies 4.000-inch steel crank, Oliver rods, Wiseco 9.5:1 pistons

Cylinder heads: CNC-ported Thitek aluminum castings

Camshaft: custom Arrow Racing hydraulic roller (specs classified)

Valvetrain: COMP Cams valvesprings, Smith pushrod

Induction: Edelbrock E-Force supercharger and throttle-body

Ignition: stock

Exhaust: custom Arrow Lane headers, custom X-pipe, dual 3-inch MagnaFlow mufflers

Cooling system: C&R Racing radiator, Spal electric fans

Output: 1,004 hp at 6,200 rpm and 1,109 lb-ft at 4,800 rpm

Drivetrain

Transmission: Tremec TKO 600 five-speed manual, Centerforce clutch, Hurst shifter

Rear axle: Strange S60 rearend with 35-spline axles, 3.54:1 gears, and limited-slip differential

Chassis

Front suspension: Reilly Motorsports K-member, control arms, coilovers, steering rack, and sway bar

Rear suspension: Reilly Motorsports four-link, Panhard bar, coilovers, and sway bar

Brakes: Wilwood 14-inch discs and six-piston calipers, front; Wilwood 12-inch discs and four-piston calipers, rear

Wheels & Tires

Wheels: EVOD Challenge 18×9.5, front; 18×10.5, rear

Tires: Nitto NT05 275/35ZR18, front; 295/35ZR18, rear

Read more at: http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/enthusiasts/the-1000hp-gen-iii-hemi-1970-dodge-challenger-dream-car/ar-AAcoe4U