Archive for the ‘challenger hellcat’ Tag

What will be the next Hellcat?

The 707-horsepower Hellcat engine, a supercharged 6.2 liter Hemi V8, has rewarded Dodge with much higher sales than expected, along with a great deal of publicity in both magazines and social media.

The engine, carefully set up so that it can be run “all day” at the track on hot summer days — unlike at least one competitive Camaro — seems to be a real winner, but it’s available only in two cars, the closely related Challenger and Charger. In the Challenger, buyers can get a manual or automatic; in the Charger, it’s all automatic, but that automatic responds far more quickly than even a well-trained human can.

As Chrysler and its suppliers work to boost production of the Hellcat engine (particularly the unique supercharger), the next question becomes, “Which car is next?”

There are two real possibilities, both of which have been rumored: the Ram 1500 and the Jeep Grand Cherokee. The Jeep is the more credible choice, because the Grand Cherokee SRT has been a hit — and has been able to command a higher price than most FCA US cars. In addition, the suspension has already been tuned for performance with the 392 engine, which puts out 485 horsepower.

Jeep Grand Cherokee is a worldwide seller, and a Hellcat version would certainly be relatively popular in parts of the world where Rams are rare if available at all.

Ram, on the other hand, would be much harder to performance-tune; engineers would be starting from scratch, rather than building on work already done. Packaging might be easier, but would it sell more normal Rams, the way a Grand Cherokee Hellcat would sell more of the 6.4 SRTs?

All indicators, and our own long ears, are that the next Hellcat will be a Grand Cherokee. There’s no point in waiting for it to come out this year, though — demand for the hot engine means that it’ll be restricted to large cars for the moment, simply because orders exceed supply.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/07/what-will-be-the-next-hellcat-29268

The 1,000HP Gen III Hemi 1970 Dodge Challenger Dream Car

For some, Super Stock and “Super Stalk” might as well be one in the same. For others however, both are distinctly different, yet equally heroic endeavors. In NHRA Super Stock, the Big Three dumped ludicrous stacks of money to build factory ringers for bragging rights and bragging rights alone. This results in cool stuff like 9,000-rpm hydraulic roller small-blocks that run 9-second e.t.’s. By contrast, “super stalk” describes one man’s quest to chase down the exact same car for 30 years before finally convincing the owner to put it up for sale. It takes a very unique car to inspire such an extreme obsession, and the story behind Brook Niemi’s ’70 Dodge Challenger proves that the truth is indeed much more interesting than fiction.

Although people love reminiscing about how everything was better during the muscle car era, they rarely mention that it was also a time when real car guys worked at car dealerships. Imagine, for a moment, the luxury of ordering up the Mopar of your dreams with an employee discount to boot. Throw in a savvy employee’s knowledge of all the obscure option codes offered by Chrysler, and Brook’s Challenger is the result. “The original owner was a Dodge salesman in Great Falls, Montana, who ordered it as a company car,” Brook explains. “The dealership didn’t allow optioning company cars with Hemis or Six Pack induction systems, so he ordered it up with the R/T package, 440 big-block, a four-barrel carb, an A833 four-speed, and a Dana 60 rearend. Once the car arrived, he swapped out the four-barrel carb and the stock hood for a Six Pack and a factory T/A hood. The car was also optioned with the Special Edition package, which included a smaller back window, four-point seatbelts, and a console in the headliner.”

Eventually, the unique E-Body moved on to its second owner a few years later, which is when Brook first saw it and fell head over heels. “During high school in the late ’70s, the machine shop I was working at built a 500ci Six Pack engine for the Challenger. At that time it was painted white and built to look like the car from Vanishing Point,” he recalls. “I have such vivid memories of the owner pulling wheelies with the car in the parking lot. From that day forward, I always kept up with the car. The third owner purchased the car in the early ’80s and never drove it much.”

The bad news was that the Challenger’s third owner seemed to appreciate it more for its collectability than its Chevy-stomping potential. The good news was that this same lack of use kept the car in outstanding condition. “From the early ’80s to 2005, the car sat in storage. The owner at the time liked that the Challenger was one of less than 150 built with a 440 and a four-speed, but his real passion was for ’60s-era cars,” Brook says. “He planned on restoring the car back to stock someday, but he eventually had a change of heart and decided to sell it to help fund other projects. He had been sitting on my contact information for years, so as soon as I got the call that the car was available, I picked it up immediately.”

Throughout the course of its decorated history, this fine Mopar specimen had logged just 54,000 original miles. Even so, the 30-year-old paint had seen better days, so Brook stripped the car down, repainted it, and dropped the original 440 back in it. While the crew at Kindig-It Design tackled the paint and bodywork, the car revealed yet another one of its interesting secrets. “The paint code indicated that the car was originally Sublime Green. Since that made it even rarer, the shop tried to talk me into painting it the original OE color,” Brook recalls. “I understood the reasoning behind it, but in my mind the car had to be white because that’s the color it was when I first saw it as a kid. I always remembered it as a Vanishing Point tribute car, so that’s how I planned on restoring it.”

By sticking with his guns, Brook successfully re-created the car from his childhood dreams. All was good in his hood until a chance encounter with another Mopar triggered an avalanche of changes. “I was sitting at a stoplight one day when a Sublime Green Challenger R/T with a 426 Hemi pulled up behind me. It looked so good that even though I had just finished painting my car white, I decided at that moment that I had to repaint it green,” Brook says. On one hand, stripping the car back down just to repaint it seemed like an awful lot of work, and Brook was tempted to modernize the powertrain, suspension, and brakes. On the other hand, he had some reservations about throwing a bunch of non-original parts on such a rare piece of Mopar history. Ultimately, the itch to build something truly unique prevailed.

Seeking modern levels of power, driveability, braking, handling, and comfort in a 40-year-old chassis required a major overhaul of all the major mechanical hardware. Granted, a stock 440 provides plenty of scoot by most standards, but Brook wanted more power. Like three times more power. He determined that the best method of accomplishing this without increasing mass was by swapping out the big-block for a supercharged, all-aluminum Gen III Hemi. Absolute Performance (Sandy, Utah) welcomed the challenge and schemed up the perfect combination for Brook’s needs. The setup is based on an aftermarket aluminum block that’s been bored to 4.125 inches and fitted with a Callies forged 4.000-inch crankshaft, Oliver steel rods, and custom Wiseco 9.5:1 forged pistons. An Edelbrock E-Force supercharger pressurizes air molecules into a set of Thitek aluminum cylinder heads, and custom Arrow Lane headers evacuate the cylinders. The result is 426 ci of Gen III Hemi that kicks out over 1,000 hp and 1,100 lb-ft of torque. For easier freeway cruising, Brook replaced the A833 trans for a Tremec TKO 600 five-speed, which feeds torque to a Strange S60 rearend.

Of course, horsepower alone is meaningless if it all goes up in smoke, so Brook completely revamped the chassis with Reilly Motorsports hardware. Up front, the stock suspension has been replaced with an RMS K-member, control arms, sway bar, and coilovers. Out back, the factory leaf springs got yanked for an RMS four-link system. Monster Wilwood disc brakes convert forward inertia into heat, while 18-inch EVOD wheels wrapped in Nitto rubber plant the lateral and longitudinal loads to the pavement.

Inevitably, some collectors won’t take too kindly to throwing a late-model EFI motor along with modern suspension and brakes at a super rare Challenger with only 54,000 original miles. Nevertheless, from the car’s original interior to its stock body and paint, Brook has gone to great lengths to retain the essence of what the Challenger looked like when it rolled into the dealer lot in 1970. “Sure, I had some reservations about putting a bunch of modern parts on this car, but I’ve put the original engine, rearend, K-member, and suspension into safe storage. I can swap all the original parts back in very easily,” he explains.

Ultimately, Brook doesn’t have to explain himself to anyone. After patiently stalking his prey for 30 years, he’s earned the right to do whatever he wants, period correctness be damned. Despite how utterly badass Brook’s 1,000hp Challenger may be, its cool factor still takes a backseat to the incredible story behind it. Lusting over the same car for three decades, then transforming it into the ultimate E-Body, could just be the most rewarding car building experience of all time. As the saying goes, you can’t make this stuff up.

Fast Facts
1970 Dodge Challenger
Brook Niemi
South Jordan, UT

Engine

Type: Chrysler Gen III Hemi small-block

Block: Mopar Performance aluminum bored to 4.125 inches

Oiling: Melling oil pump, Milodon pan

Rotating assembly: Callies 4.000-inch steel crank, Oliver rods, Wiseco 9.5:1 pistons

Cylinder heads: CNC-ported Thitek aluminum castings

Camshaft: custom Arrow Racing hydraulic roller (specs classified)

Valvetrain: COMP Cams valvesprings, Smith pushrod

Induction: Edelbrock E-Force supercharger and throttle-body

Ignition: stock

Exhaust: custom Arrow Lane headers, custom X-pipe, dual 3-inch MagnaFlow mufflers

Cooling system: C&R Racing radiator, Spal electric fans

Output: 1,004 hp at 6,200 rpm and 1,109 lb-ft at 4,800 rpm

Drivetrain

Transmission: Tremec TKO 600 five-speed manual, Centerforce clutch, Hurst shifter

Rear axle: Strange S60 rearend with 35-spline axles, 3.54:1 gears, and limited-slip differential

Chassis

Front suspension: Reilly Motorsports K-member, control arms, coilovers, steering rack, and sway bar

Rear suspension: Reilly Motorsports four-link, Panhard bar, coilovers, and sway bar

Brakes: Wilwood 14-inch discs and six-piston calipers, front; Wilwood 12-inch discs and four-piston calipers, rear

Wheels & Tires

Wheels: EVOD Challenge 18×9.5, front; 18×10.5, rear

Tires: Nitto NT05 275/35ZR18, front; 295/35ZR18, rear

Read more at: http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/enthusiasts/the-1000hp-gen-iii-hemi-1970-dodge-challenger-dream-car/ar-AAcoe4U

FCA’s lineup for New York show

While Fiat Chrysler will not be showing any new vehicles at the New York Auto Show, whose press days start tomorrow, the company will bring a wide range of cars and trucks for those who don’t travel the country to see unveilings as they happen.

The most controversial entry is the 2015 Ram Laramie Limited, first shown in Chicago, which Ram called “the benchmark in truck opulence.” From Detroit, Ram is showing the 2015 Ram Rebel, which includes a suspension lift, 33-inch tires, a custom interior, and the first non-crosshair grille in some time.

Alfa Romeo is showing off the 2015 Alfa Romeo 4C Spider, which follows the coupe version; it has absurdly low weight thanks to a carbon fiber monocoque chassis, allowing it to use a 1.75 liter turbocharged engine to from 0 to 60 mph in 4.1 seconds.

As one might expect, the new Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger, and Dodge Challenger will all be shown; each of these cars has a standard eight speed automatic (Challenger also has six-speed manuals for every V8). Among the Challengers will be the 392 Hemi Scat Pack Dodge Challenger Shaker, and both Hellcat Charger and Hellcat Challenger.

Fiat is showing the new 2016 Fiat 500X, a larger-than-500 hatchback, presumably along with the 500L, 500C, and 500.

The Jeep Renegade will be shown, and since it was on the off-road demonstration track in Chicago, we expect it to be in the New York track as well.

Mopar will spotlight four customized models; the Jeep Performance Parts-equipped Jeep Renegade makes the Trailhawk model more trail tough, the Sublime Green Dodge Challenger T/A Concept blends vintage design cues with Mopar parts, the Chrysler 200S Mopar shows a new body kit, and the Fiat 500L Custom has been, as the name indicates, customized.

We also expect Maserati to show off their full line, and Ferrari is bound to be present.

Camp Jeep will return to New York, with an 18-foot high Jeep Mountain and Trail Rated Pass three-wheeling demo. Other interactive rides include the 2015 Dodge Charger racing simulator; 2015 Ram Truck off-road simulator; and Chrysler brand’s “Beneath the Surface” 4-minute, 4D-immersive experience using the Oculus Rift DK2 headset, showcasing how the 2015 Chrysler 200 is made.

The New York Auto Show is held at the Javits Center, which is walking-distance from Penn Station, the midtown ferry, and the 42 bus line; the adventurous can also try to reach it by subway or the Port Authority bus terminal. Public show dates are April 3-12; the show opens every day at 10 am, and closes at 10 pm except on Sundays (7 pm). The cost is $16 anyone 13 and older, $7 for children under 13; there are discounts for adult groups of 20 or more, and for child groups of 10 or more. Annual public attendance is over one million, and the display area is now 950,000 square feet including the new Javits Center North.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/03/fcas-lineup-for-new-york-show-28245

2015 Dodge Challenger SRT 392

I’ve just started reading the third installment in a planned five-book biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, Master of the Senate, written by the incomparable Robert Caro. Conveniently, a recent trip to drive the BMW X6 M and 228i Convertible was to be staged in Austin, TX, within easy driving distance of LBJ’s birthplace, Johnson City. And yes, the city is named for his family.

Having completed my duties with the Bimmers, I borrowed the spangled 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT 392 you see above, to squire me around the Texas capitol for a weekend, and as a lift out to the Hill Country homestead of our 36th President.

Johnson City isn’t exactly a road trip mecca, but there’s a pretty good brewery, a museum, the reconstructed LBJ house to take snapshots of, and it’s a nice drive to get out there if you’ve got a 485-horsepower muscle car at your disposal.

Driving Notes

– With the heroic Hellcat, this 392 and the R/T Scat Pack (that Brandon Turkus reviewed recently), there are more SRT-treated Challengers to choose from than ever before. There are 707 obvious reasons that the Hellkitty is the top dog (as it were), but there are important difference between this 392 and the Scat Pack, too. Both cars make use of the 6.4-liter Hemi V8 putting out 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque, but the 392 also gets an adaptive suspension, six-piston Brembo brake calipers (instead of four-piston), wider tires, leather and Alcantara seats, a heated steering wheel, a louder stereo and HID headlights.

– When LBJ was campaigning for his seat in the House of Representatives, he would’ve loved to have something as potent as this monster of a V8 under the hood of his canvassing car. The 6.4L snorts with authority before it sends the big coupe forward to just about any speed I’d ask of it, and with a quickness. Johnson was known for haranguing drivers to step on it, when all that stood between himself and a few more votes was the ability to fit one more stump speech into the day. The 392 feels as though it could cover a quarter of the state of Texas in a morning if you throttle down deep enough (faster even than the Johnson City Windmill, I’d guess).

– Though there’s a six-speed manual available, I’m actually quite fond of the eight-speed automatic in the 392. The two-pedal setup better suits the fast-cruiser attitude of the car, and it never served up any poorly conceived shift logic when I left it in D.

– Of course, the roads are better now than they were in the 1930s and 40s, too. Even on rather remote Farm to Market roads, the Challenger will grip and go around meandering corners, and turn in harder than you’d expect. This iteration of the Dodge doesn’t feel any more light on its feet than the others I’ve driven, but it’s capable of fast point-to-point driving once you start to trust the rubber and brakes (which are excellent), and get over the wideness of the track.

– Big guys like LBJ and myself have always fit well in the Challenger, and nothing about that changes with the 392. The seats are thick and well bolstered, with more than enough adjustment for me to find a comfortable position with good visibility. I even had four adults in the car for a few shorter drives around Austin, and only my extreme tallness would stop that from being a good idea for longer journeys.

– I haven’t spent as much time on the roadways of the Lone Star State as some of the other Autoblog editors have, but I think I can appreciate that this Dodge is a capable all-around sports car for country like this, if not a knife sharp one. What the Challenger lacks in things like steering response and feedback, it makes up for somewhat in ride quality and refinement. The 392 is even pretty quiet while at speed… unless you poke the thunder with a toe-tap of throttle.

Being honest, everything I like about the Challenger is present in every V8-powered version of the car (and a lot of it even in the base V6). But the 392 does add in enough specialness, enough potential for instant and thrilling drama, and a deep well of power to make it one of the best flavors SRT offers. And, at some $15k cheaper than the SRT Hellcat, it almost feels like a super-muscle car value. At $45,995 to start, it’s in the realm of affordability for a variant that you aren’t going to see in every other supermarket parking lot.

It may not be exactly Presidential in the total picture, but I think it’s a car that the fast-talking-Texan side of ol’ Landslide Lyndon would have truly appreciated. And it unquestionably makes for a great ride out to see his birthplace.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2015/03/09/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-392-quick-spin-review/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Auction Actually Raised $1.65M

he Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat that sold over the weekend actually raised more money for charity than first reported. . . a lot more!

After crossing the block at the Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas auction for an incredible $825,000, Dodge has announced that the Engelstad Family Foundation has matched the auction pricing bringing the total amount raised for charity to $1.65 million. With the generous donation, the grand total means the Challenger SRT Hellcat has raised more money for charity than any other car in Barrett-Jackson history. As icing on the cake, Barrett-Jackson waived all bidding and consignment fees so 100 percent of the sale price will go on to benefit Opportunity Village, a not-for-profit organization that serves people with significant intellectual disabilities in the Las Vegas area.

The winning bidder of the auction was none other than Rick Hendrick, owner of Hendrick Motorsports and several Chrysler Group dealerships. The auction package included a 6.2-liter supercharger engine cover and a HEMI Orange painted base presentation box with a VIN0001 electronic vehicle build book and a video documentary on an iPad Mini that shows the step-by-step build process of the car.

“The $1.65 million raised by auctioning this one-of-one Dodge Challenger Hellcat at this year’s Barrett-Jackson auction means the most powerful muscle car ever will also have a very powerful impact on the people who benefit from the services of Opportunity Village,” said Tim Kuniskis, President and CEO, Dodge and SRT Brands, Chrysler Group LLC. “The VIN0001 muscle car was not only one of the hottest cars that rolled through the Barrett-Jackson auction lanes, it is also the ultimate collectible 2015 Dodge Challenger as Dodge is ensuring there will never be another one like it.”

Read more at: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2014/09/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-auction-actually-raised-1-65m.html

The NEW 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Officially Unveiled

Dodge has officially unveiled the most powerful vehicle to ever wear the Challenger name – the SRT Hellcat – complete with over 600 horsepower courtesy of a supercharged, 6.2-liter Hemi V8. It will be offered alongside the 485-hp Challenger SRT.

The new, force-induced V8 isn’t just the most powerful ever fitted to the Challenger, it’s the most powerful eight-cylinder Chrysler Group has ever built. Power figures aren’t finalized, so expect to see “over 600 hp” bandied about quite a lot. That fury will be channeled through either a six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic. Yes, over 600 ponies through an eight-speed auto. So far, the only vehicle we know of that delivers more output through that many gears is the as-yet untested Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Sadly, we don’t have performance metrics just yet, although if this thing can’t crack four seconds to 60 miles per hour, we’ll be pretty surprised.

As is the theme nowadays, the 2015 Challenger SRT features a number of driving modes, governing power output, shift speeds for the 8AT, steering effort, traction control settings and suspension settings. There are three pre-programmed options – Default, Sport and Track – and a Custom mode that allows drivers to mix and match to their heart’s content.

Like the Ford Mustang Boss 302, the SRT Hellcat will arrive with two keys, one red and one black. The red key is the one we want, as it unlocks the car’s full potential, while the black key is more or less a valet key, limiting output of that supercharged beast under the hood.

Both the SRT Hellcat and the lesser SRT model will ride on unique 20-inch alloys. An eight-spoke design, wrapped in either Goodyear Eagle RSA2 all-seasons or Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar tires, will be offered on the naturally aspirated model. The Hellcat and Track Pack-equipped SRT will get wider 20s and Y-plus-rated Pirelli PZero Nero tires. Corralling the SRT Hellcat’s 600 ponies will be the task of a set of 15.4-inch, two-piece Brembo brakes with six-piston calipers.

Finally, the SRT Hellcat’s extra oomph certainly demands some aesthetic tweaks. On the exterior, a Viper-like hood scoop dominates the head-on appearance of the 600-hp Challenger. That functional scoop is flanked by an equally functional set of air extractors, while the new vertical-split grille is a styling item borrowed from the 1971 Challenger. And in case all this visual aggression isn’t enough, Dodge has added a very, very conspicuous “SUPERCHARGED” badge to the Challenger Hellcat’s fenders.

Production of the most powerful Challenger will kick off during the third quarter of 2014 at Chrysler’s Brampton, Ontario factory. Expect pricing information to be released closer to launch. Take a look below for a video and the full press release on both the Challenger SRT and SRT Hellcat, and then hop up top for a gallery of images of the new tire-shredder.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2014/05/20/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-official/

2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat

What It Is: The long-rumored 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat being put through its paces under gloomy skies. Wearing but tiny strips of camo on its front and rear fascias, Chrysler apparently feels that, since the 2015 Challenger update was revealed at the New York auto show, cloaking measures are no longer required for the Hellcat’s nearly identical exterior.

Unfortunately for them, our savvy photogs caught one in the wild, immediately zeroing in on the Hellcat’s telltale center-mounted and front-facing air-intake scoop. Even better, they managed to snag a shot with the Challenger’s hood raised, exposing the massive supercharger that, for those of a certain age, will likely bring to mind the “rat roaster” aftermarket intakes favored by brave Challenger Hemi owners during the pony car’s first go-round some 40 years ago. Sure the technology is completely different (with a distinct lack of carburetion), but evoking the past has been part of the modern Challenger’s appeal since day one. In addition to the Viper-esque hood scoop, it appears the Challenger Hellcat will pack the same revised front fascias, deep air dam, LED headlight halo, and taillamps as the rest of the Challenger lineup.

Why It Matters: The pony-car war is still on full boil, and Dodge needs to keep the Challenger interesting in the face of the redesigned 2015 Mustang and its forthcoming Shelby GT350 variant rumored to be packing a flat-plane “Voodoo” V-8. And then there are the Camaro ZL-1 and the Z/28. Bragging rights mean a lot in this segment, and if it takes forced induction to keep the Challenger relevant, you wont hear a whimper of complaint from us.

Platform: Nothing new here, the Challenger Hellcat is expected to soldier on with the same shortened LX platform as its siblings. We wouldn’t be surprised if Chrysler tweaked spring rates, dampers and bushings for Hellcat duty, and the bright-red Brembo calipers seen in the images appear to be a tad more substantial than those in current use.

Powertrain: Initial rumors pegged the Hellcat’s numbers somewhere just north of 600 horsepower and with 575 lb-ft of torque, but recent remarks made by SRT chief Ralph Gilles insinuated that the final number may top the 640-hp output of the V-10–powered Viper. The current 6.4-liter Hemi generates 470 horsepower and 470 lb-ft, and pushing the horsepower number beyond 600 via forced induction is the easy part; making it tractable and durable is where the work is done. Reports are that the Hemi will back up to a ZF-sourced eight-speed automatic.

Estimated Arrival and Price: Our latest intel has the 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat arriving in the third quarter of 2014 as 2015 model. Pricing is up in the air, but with the current Challenger SRT8 ringing in with an MSRP just south of $47,000, you can bet the Hellcat will be north of the $50K mark.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/news/2015-dodge-challenger-hellcat-spy-photos-news