Archive for the ‘jeep renegade’ Tag

2017 Jeep Compass debuts with tiny Grand Cherokee looks

Meet the Jeep Compass. It is, thankfully, completely new and entirely unrelated to the Jeep Compass and Patriot that are on sale now. Bet you almost forgot about that pair. As the new C-Segment SUV in Jeep’s lineup, it’ll replace both of those models and take a spot in between the Renegade and Cherokee.

 

The new Compass is based on a stretched version of the Renegade platform, what Fiat Chrysler Automotive in a fit of eloquence calls the “Small Wide 4×4” architecture. We expect front-wheel drive as standard and four-wheel drive as a very commonly selected option. The Compass should offer either a 2.0-liter turbo inline-four or a naturally-aspirated 2.4-liter inline-four, both mated to a nine-speed automatic transmission. There’s a chance it’ll get a manual, but it’s a very slim chance. That being said, globally there will be 17 powertrain options, according to FCA, and that may mean US consumers will have more than one choice in the matter. Judging by the first photo above, a an off-road-ready Trailhawk model is a good bet.

We’ve already seen this thing completely uncovered in these spy shots, which were taken in Brazil, where it will be produced, so the overall mini-Grand Cherokee aesthetic isn’t a surprise. The interior looks more like the Cherokee’s than the Renegade’s, however, and you’ll notice there’s no controversial T-handle shifter in sight.

So why didn’t we see the new Compass at the New York Auto Show, like everybody expected? Jeep says it’s because it wanted the reveal to occur at the plant that’s going to build the thing, highlighting the importance of the South and Central American markets for the brand. There will be a North American debut with more information coming at the LA Auto Show in November, so we won’t have too long to wait for more details. As originally planned, the Compass should hit American dealerships in early 2017.

Read more at: http://www.autoblog.com/2016/09/26/2017-jeep-compass-debut-official/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016#slide-4075447

THE JEEP® BRAND HAS YOUR SUMMER NECESSITIES COVERED

jeep lineup

If you want to make summer 2016 truly sizzle, hop in the driver’s seat of a Jeep® brand vehicle and take an excursion to the city, go on a backcountry adventure, or set off on a day-trip with the family. To celebrate the season properly you need a vehicle that’s capable enough to reach your destination and stylish enough to leave a lasting impression, from the ballpark to the campground and everywhere in-between. Here’s your checklist for the summer necessities. On your mark, get set…

Day at the Ballpark

Nothing says summer quite like America’s pastime. Start planning your day at the ballpark with the 2016 Jeep Compass High Altitude. The leather-trimmed seats and power sunroof will make getting to the game, well, a day in the park. Once you arrive, the generous cargo space and available flip-down liftgate speakers will make you the all-star of any tailgate. Just make sure you have Take Me Out to the Ballgame on your playlist.

Weekend Camping Trip

At least once every summer you need to get away for peace of mind. Head to the woods and clear your head in the 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland. The legendary off-road vehicle can tackle any environment, and has the Trail Rated® badge to prove it. On four-wheel-drive models, the standard Quadra-Trac II® 4×4 system features a two-speed transfer case that uses input from a variety of sensors in order to determine tire slip at the earliest possible moment and take corrective action – sending as much as 100% of available torque to the axle with the most traction so you can plan your camping trip in any location and in nearly any weather conditions.

Essential Summer Road Trip

The summer road trip is a right of passage in America. It’s a way to revive the senses and expand boundaries. For those daring enough to explore new locations, the Jeep Renegade 75th Anniversary edition will transport you to the far reaches of your city and your country. And since the best part of a road trip is the open-air freedom, the available My Sky® dual-panel roof will let in the sunshine and summer breezes. Just try to make it home before autumn, if you can.

Off-road Adventure

Whether there’s a trail in your hometown or you’re traveling to a Jeep Jamboree USA event, summer is the time to see what your 2016 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon — the vehicle Four Wheeler magazine named “4×4 of the Decade” — is really capable of. Every Jeep Wrangler is fortified with underbody skid plates to help protect the fuel tank and transfer case, and heavy-duty, forged-steel dual front and single rear frame-mounted tow hooks come standard, in case you come upon a fellow trail rider in a pinch. If the forecast is sunny and conditions allow, drop the top and take off the doors* for a truly exhilarating summer trail ride.

Day at the Beach

Want to turn heads at the beach this summer? Pull up to shore in the unforgettable Jeep Cherokee and stake your claim in the sand. Featuring the innovative Jeep brand cargo management system with handy hooks and removable holders, the 2016 Jeep Cherokee is ready to haul your beach towels, cooler, flying disc, wakeboard and umbrella to the beach, not to mention buckets and shovels for the kids.

Backyard Cookout or Company Picnic

The smell of a grill is the smell of summer. You’re obligated to enjoy as many cookouts as possible, and to play all the croquet and badminton you can handle. Arrive with the family in the 2016 Jeep Patriot High Altitude, with bright exterior accents and the available 4×4 system, and show your true colors. The Patriot helps protect your most precious cargo with safety and security features, including a total of six airbags† and available ParkView® Rear Back Up Camera.

Read more at: http://blog.jeep.com/news/jeep-brand-summer-necessities-covered/

What do little Jeeps and big vans have in common?

Sales numbers bump around a lot, but sometimes patterns emerge — and this month, two big ones showed up.

First, the rise of the little crossovers, with Jeep Compass and Renegade both doubling their sales figures from April 2015. This is the trend Sergio Marchionne was talking about when he rationalized dropping Dart and 200 development (Dart fell by 49% and 200 by 60%). The Compass has been around for years; yet its sales doubled. The new-ish Renegade still beat it. The Patriot, similar in most ways to the Compass, posted a 10% gain.

The small-crossover story continues “out of brand” with the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V beating the Civic and Corolla, respectively. Only the Toyota Camry beat its crossover version. (Fiat’s 500X+500L together outsold last year’s 500L alone, but those numbers are still minimal: all Fiats combined hit 3,045.)

As for the big vans, both the Chrysler Town & Country and Caravan soared. The relatively inexpensive Caravan more than doubled in sales, rising 116% to 13,203 for the month — beating every other Dodge and every Chrysler (but only coming in middlin’ by Jeep standards). The pricier Town & Country hit 9,195 sales. It’s possible that some of this is due to incentives, as the company clears lots for the new Pacifica; and some may be from customers seeking to get a cheap Dodge minivan while they can, not realizing that the Dodge will stay in production for around another year.

Perhaps minivans are just having a good month: at Honda, Odyssey sales rose by 13%, hitting 13,047. But at Toyota, Sienna sales dropped by 8% to 10,795. It looks like this is an FCA phenomenon, and it’s pushed the Caravan to #1 best selling minivan in the US for April. Year to date, the Odyssey clocks in at 40,486 and Caravan at 46,915, a nice lead (Chrysler is at 40,811, also beating the Odyssey, though not be quite as much.)

The other big vans — the ProMasters — did well, too. The full sized ProMaster hit a 61% increase, to 2,835; and the City rose by 89% to 1,880. Ford dominates this market to an absurd degree, partly through consistency.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/2016/05/what-do-little-jeeps-and-big-vans-have-in-common-31724

Cherokee vs Wrangler: the winner

In November, we visited the sales race between the new Jeep Cherokee and the Jeep Wrangler — a modern, lighter-duty vehicle and a heavy-duty traditionalist. The Wrangler had been falling behind, possibly because Daimler did not build the plant with any expansion in mind.

Those constraints will not ease until, ironically, the Wrangler takes over the Cherokee’s plant, pushing the more modern Jeep out of Ohio. The Wrangler sells as quickly as it can be built, despite the lack of a recent redesign or most of the Cherokee’s gizmos and creature comforts.

In November, US buyers had picked up 196,211 Jeep Cherokees, versus 187,111 Jeep Wranglers and 174,950 Jeep Grand Cherokees. Canadians had chosen Cherokees as the top Jeep every month of the year, and outside North America, the Cherokee easily outsells the Wrangler.

For 2015 as a whole, the Jeep Cherokee easily beat the Jeep Wrangler (in the US), 220,260 to 202,702; the pair were closer in 2015, when the Wrangler beat the Cherokee by around 3,200 sales. The Grand Cherokee came in at #3, with 195,958 sales.

The other Jeep race was between the new Jeep Renegade and the Jeep Compass, and we’d called it for the Compass, which had a full year of sales vs the abbreviated Renegade 2015. Not surprisingly, the Compass, with just 66,698 sales, eked out a Pyrrhic victory over the Renegade, with 60,946. 2016 will almost certainly change the order; though a new Jeep Compass is due at some point. In the meantime, the Patriot’s surprising 27% gain, to nearly 120,000 sales, made keeping it around a paying proposition.

There is another disclaimer: there are two Jeep Wrangler models, on different wheelbases, but there are also two cars using the same basic chassis on the Grand Cherokee side. Adding Dodge Durango sales to the Grand Cherokee (as Wrangler Unlimited is added to Wrangler) would easily push that pair to the top.

As read on: https://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2016/01/cherokee-vs-wrangler-the-winner-30944

Nissan Juke Vs. Jeep Renegade: Compare Cars

Believe it or not, the Jeep Renegade and Nissan Juke are in the same category of small SUVs. But they could hardly be more different. The Renegade is Jeep’s littlest SUV, with square-cut styling and genuine off-road prowess. The Juke, on the other hand, is a style-first urban warrior whose all-wheel-drive option is more for on-road traction than anything even in the neighborhood of rocky trails or mountain climbing.

New in 2015, the Renegade is the first vehicle developed from the ground up for global sale by the combined Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. While it’ll likely sell well in North America, its minimal dimensions make it best-suited to bring the Jeep brand to more crowded and less affluent markets in Europe, Asia, and South America. Its design is every inch classic SUV, with oversize lights and other details for visual interest.
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The interior is straightforward, modern, and contains a number of Jeep-brand reminders in the form of “Easter Egg” design elements. The Renegade’s front seats are comfortable, but there’s not that much room in the rear unless rear-seat riders bargain aggressively with those in the front. The seats are comfortable and nicely bolstered, and the Renegade is clearly wider than other AWD entries, meaning the shoulders of the two front-seat riders are suitably separated.

The Juke, on the other hand, has been with us since the 2011 model year. Its wild-style design is polarizing: You either love for it for its in-your-face, tall, haunched, bug-eyed appearance or hate it for the same reasons. A light restyle for 2015 has made it, if anything, even more mean-looking. The Juke’s layout and switchgear are straightforward even if the motorcycle-inspired gauges, shiny nylon upholstery, and colorful inserts give it far more design edge.

Interior space is adequate in the front, with a somewhat upright seating position, but quite cramped in the rear–and the Juke has less cargo space to boot, just 36 cubic feet with the rear seat folded down (which is how we expect most Jukes will be driven), against 51 cubic feet for the Renegade. In the end, the Jeep is simply far better at the utility jobs that many people need: hauling people and stuff.

The Jeep Renegade comes with two powertrain options. The base model is propelled by a 160-horsepower turbocharged 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine paired with a six-speed manual gearbox. If you don’t want to shift for yourself, you’ll move up to the 180-hp 2.4-liter four, which uses the new nine-speed automatic transmission that’s increasingly common in new Chrysler, Jeep, and Fiat products. Front-wheel drive is standard, with all-wheel drive optional for both engines.

The Nissan Juke is powered by a 188-hp, 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with either front- or all-wheel drive, and a continuously variable (CVT) transmission. The CVT makes it somewhat sluggish around town unless you drive it hard, when it tightens up and offers more fun. Performance fans, however, will go for the Juke NISMO or NISMO RS—both offering a manual gearbox. The NISMO RS gets a top-performance version of the same engine, boosted to 215 hp. The NISMO versions also get more than 100 upgrades to suit their hot-hatch personae.

While the NISMOs are in a separate category–they’re smaller competitors to cars like the Subaru WRX and VW Golf GTI–the conventional Juke powertrain just isn’t as direct or enjoyable to drive as the Jeep’s pair. Not to mention that the AWD Juke gave us truly atrocious fuel economy during a test several years ago–only slightly more than 20 mpg.

The Juke’s safety ratings are mixed–not unexpected for an older design–while the Renegade hasn’t yet been rated for crash safety by either the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

The 2015 Renegade comes in four trim levels: the base Sport (starting at $18,990 for the base 2WD version), the mid-level Latitude ($22,290), and the top-of-the-line Limited ($25,790). All-wheel drive is a $2,000 option. Then there’s the Trailhawk model ($26,990) with its greater off-road capability, which only comes with all-wheel drive and the larger 2.4-liter engine with the nine-speed automatic. All prices above include the mandatory $995 delivery fee.

The 2015 Juke starts at $21,705 and rises to more than $30,000 for a top-spec NISMO model. Even the base Juke S includes Intelligent Key with push-button start, a backup camera, and the NissanConnect system with Mobile Apps and a text message assistant. The mid-range Juke SV adds a moonroof; a rearview camera system; push-button start; satellite radio; the I-CON system; automatic temperature control; and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. The top-trim Juke (other than NISMO models) is the SL, which layers on navigation; leather-trimmed seats; and an 8-inch Rockford Fosgate subwoofer with six upgraded speakers.

Overall, the Jeep Renegade easily gets the nod here. When the Juke was the sole hot-hatch SUV on the market, it was a new and interesting way to get that capability in a smaller size than the usual compact crossover. But now that we have entries from not only Jeep but also Chevy, Fiat, and even Buick, the Juke comes up short: It’s too small and cramped, and doesn’t offer the sturdy off-roading ability of the littlest Jeep.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1098188_nissan-juke-vs-jeep-renegade-compare-cars?fbfanpage

More praise for Jeeps and Durango

Car & Driver recently compared SUVs in two categories: Mid-Size Crossovers and SUVs and 3-row Crossovers and SUVs.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee, which has won more awards than any other SUV, bested the Dodge Journey, Volkswagen Touareg, Toyota 4Runner, Nissan XTerra, Kia Sorento, Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, Nissan Murano and Ford Edge in the mid-size SUV class.

Car & Driver’s editors said: “Whether you want to climb a mountain or just move up the ladder of success, the Grand Cherokee has you covered. With a choice of four 4×4 systems plus an optional Quadra-Lift air suspension, there’s no obstacle too difficult to tackle.”

In the 3-row category, the Dodge Durango was judged the best of the bunch. It beat the Mitsubishi Outlander, Nissan Pathfinder (which is being discontinued), Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia, Buick Enclave, Ford Flex, Toyota Highlander, Mazda CX-9, Hyundai Santa Fe, Ford Explorer and Honda Pilot.

“The Durango remains big, brawny, and masculine in an era of soft, curvaceous crossovers, but it’s not as trucklike as other large sport-utes…The V-6 models are enough for most, with smooth acceleration, while Hemi models deliver excellent torque, especially handy for towing.”

In Great Britain, the Jeep Renegade was named 4×4 Magazine’s “4×4 of the Year.” The decision by the magazine’s expert judges was unanimous and followed a tough off-road evaluation course. Those doing the testing also said the entire Renegade lineup was worthy of the top award.

“It’s a credit that any manufacturer should consider producing such a capable small off-roader,” says Nigel Fryatt, Editor, 4×4 Magazine. “That it’s so well built, while also fun and funky, is a delight.’

The Renegade also won the magazine’s “Mid-range SUV sub-£30,000 (~$45,600)” category while the Wrangler took the “Hardcore” class for the fourth consecutive year.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/12/more-praise-for-jeeps-and-durango-30779

SEVEN MUST-SEE FEATURES ON THE ALL-NEW 2015 JEEP® RENEGADE

The All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade is writing the book on style and performance for a small SUV. Designed with all the capability you’ve come to expect from the Jeep brand, the Jeep Renegade is an all-purpose vehicle that’s both city-friendly and equipped for off-road performance.

We built the Jeep Renegade from the ground up with iconic Jeep styling and capability, as well as impressive, class-exclusive features that make the most capable small SUV* ever one of the most exciting to drive. Throw away your maps and prepare to chart new courses; here are seven must-see features that set the Jeep Renegade apart.

1. Meet any challenge: The Jeep Renegade is designed for any road — or off-road — conditions, and built to perform. The class-exclusive available Select-Terrain Dial† with Auto, Snow, Sand and Mud settings, as well as an additional Rock setting on Jeep Renegade Trailhawk® models, lends added control and capability when you’re navigating the elements.

2. Let in the sun: The open road is best experienced in the open air and sunshine. If you’re looking for freedom, look no further than the class-exclusive available My Sky® open-air roof†. The secure panels are fully lockable when in place, and can be removed and stored flat in a height-adjustable rear cargo area, giving you the ability to adjust as the weather changes. The My Sky® dual-panel roof is just one of the reasons the All-New 2015 Jeep Renegade was named one of Ward’s 10 Best Interiors for 2015.

3. Shift into convenience: The All-New 2015 Jeep Renegade features a class-exclusive available nine-speed automatic transmission† that allows you to focus on the road ahead and enjoy the scenery, while also providing remarkable efficiency and virtually unnoticeable shifts between gears. A vinyl shift knob adds style and comfort when driving.

4. See the light: When you’re exploring new trails, you’re bound to encounter unexpected conditions and challenges. With class-exclusive available cornering fog lamps†, you’ll be prepared for whatever Mother Nature throws your way. Halogen cornering fog lamps — standard on Latitude, Limited and Trailhawk models — help improve visibility during heavy fog, rain or snow. Flip on the lights and start your adventure.

5. Legendary off-road performance: The All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade Trailhawk proudly wears the Trail Rated® badge, and is part of a Jeep brand tradition of legendary off-road performance. The Jeep Renegade is ready to go off the beaten path with best-in-class 4×4 capability† and two available systems: Jeep Active Drive on Sport, Latitude and Limited models, and Jeep Active Drive Low on Trailhawk models. Both systems feature a rear axle disconnect system that seamlessly switches between two- and four-wheel drive to help increase efficiency and on- and off-road performance.

6. Stay connected: However far you venture, you’ll always stay connected to your favorite entertainment with the available Uconnect® 6.5 System. SiriusXM® Premier offers more than 160 channels of your favorite music and talk radio, and integrated Uconnect® Voice Command and Bluetooth® offers hands-free calling and voice texting** for an added level of connectedness. The vivid 6.5-inch touchscreen display makes controlling your entertainment convenient when you’re on the move. And available GPS navigation is perfect for adventurers who are mapping trails on the go and forging new roads. Additional features include AM/FM radio, Aux/USB Media Hub with iPod® mobile device integration, and speed-adjusted volume.

7. Comfortable, spacious interior: The All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade is a small SUV with a big interior. For added convenience, particularly on the long treks into the wilderness, the best-in-class interior volume† offers comfort and storage, with over 118 cubic feet of space, including over 50 cubic feet of best-in-class rear cargo space with seats folded down‡. And to keep passengers and drivers warm on those cool mountain mornings, the Jeep Renegade features an available heated steering wheel and available dual-zone automatic climate control.

Whether your next adventure is in the city or under the stars, the All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade combines classic Jeep brand styling, 4×4 capability, efficiency and open-air freedom. The possibilities are endless in an award-winning SUV that’s redefining versatility and performance for a new generation of adventure-seekers with dynamic, energetic personalities.

Read more at: http://blog.jeep.com/news/seven-must-see-features-on-the-all-new-2015-jeep-renegade/

Let’s Find Out If The Jeep Renegade Is A Real Jeep

The 2015 Jeep Renegade got us all fired up when it first appeared; was this the ultimate “efficiency you need, capability you want” combo or just a little Italian car wearing daddy’s work boots? Time to take one off-road to find out.

Obviously the Renegade isn’t about to dethrone the Wrangler is the ultimate off-roadable SUV you can drive off a lot and straight to some place like Moab. But it’s not meant to, and it leaves its big brother in the dust when it comes to on-pavement comfort and fuel economy.

Even though we had to conduct our test on a pre-planned route under the watchful eyes of Jeep’s corporate ambassadors, I was more impressed by the vehicle’s abilities than I thought I’d be.

The Renegade is at home on routes that bleed the line between “dirt road” and “trail,” with enough in reserve to get you through that sketchy section you’d have to turn back at in a Honda HR-V.

A Renegade would be the wrong choice for somebody looking for a vehicle they could use everyday but “get into off-roading” with. Those people need a sedan and a CJ-7. The Renegade is the vehicle you want when you do most of your driving on the road, but like to buzz down dirt tracks free and easy (or look like you do) without the fuel economy or ride quality penalty you pick up with a bigger, taller, meaner 4×4.

Read more at: http://truckyeah.jalopnik.com/lets-find-out-if-the-jeep-renegade-is-a-real-jeep-1718262365

Jeep Renegade Vs. Chevrolet Trax: Compare Cars

The subcompact SUV segment is expected to really take off this year, and two of the highest-volume new entries are likely to be the 2015 Chevrolet Trax and the 2015 Jeep Renegade.

Offered by all-American brands, they’re smaller than their “compact” siblings, the Chevy Equinox and Jeep Cherokee, respectively. But they offer two very different approaches to designing, packaging, and equipping the smallest all-wheel-drive utility vehicles you can buy from each carmaker.

While the 2015 Trax has Chevy design cues at the front end, it’s otherwise almost the generic small SUV. It’s not bad, just bland. The littlest Jeep, on the other hand, uses oversized design flourishes–big headlights, big wheel arches, numerous Jeep logos–to underscore its toughness even in a small package, to the point where it’s almost cartoonish.

Both vehicles are impressive inside, however, with comfortable seats, quiet rides on decent pavement, and a roster of the latest infotainment and electronic safety systems that would have been seen only in luxury cars not so many years ago. Neither of these vehicles is likely to be used off-road all that much, with the possible exception of the Renegade’s toughest Trailhawk model, so they’re tuned for on-road finesse and comfort.

Each comes as a base model with front-wheel drive, and offers all-wheel drive as an option. The Chevy Trax has only a single powertrain: a 1.4-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, making 138 horsepower and paired to a six-speed automatic transmission. The Jeep Renegade, on the other hand, has two powertrains: its own 1.4-liter turbo four, putting out a stronger 160 hp, but mated only to a six-speed manual gearbox, or a 180-hp 2.4-liter four paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission. Both Jeep powertrains offer all-wheel drive as an option.

The Chevy is adequately powered, but not particularly quick; the Jeep is more powerful, but also heavier, and Fiat Chrysler’s engineers seem to have tamed their temperamental nine-speed automatic at last. We found the manual-gearbox Jeep more fun to drive and lighter on its toes, but in reality, most buyers will opt for the automatic.

Fuel economy ratings for the Trax are 29 mpg combined for the front-wheel-drive version, dropping to 27 mpg if you add all-wheel drive. Final ratings for the Jeep aren’t out yet.

The two small utes differ quite a lot in their packaging, however. Rather to our surprise, the Chevy Trax can hold four adult-sized people in reasonable comfort. Five is a very tight squeeze, and rear-seat riders will have to stagger their shoulders, but it’s definitely possible. The Jeep Renegade, on the other hand, has a smaller rear compartment that’s tight on knee room, and fitting four adults into its cabin will require negotiations to get the folks up front to sacrifice some of their own legroom.

The Jeep’s interior conveys ruggedness in its materials, shapes, and surfaces, while the Chevy is straightforward, practical, and adopts a number of clever convenience features from the Sonic subcompact on which it’s based. The Trax in particular has lots of trays, bins, cupholders, and the like to hold your gear. Both have front seats that can fold flat to carry long items diagonally.

Chevrolet has achieved top safety ratings for the Trax from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), which designated it a Top Safety Pick. It also earned five out of five stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), which gave it five stars in every category except rollover safety, where it received four stars. The Jeep Renegade hasn’t yet been rated by either group, though we expect it to get acceptable ratings at the very least.

In the end, both the 2015 Chevy Trax and the 2015 Jeep Renegade ended up with identical scores in our ranking system. The Jeep wins on styling and performance, the Chevy on features and safety. If rear-seat room is more important than styling panache, the Chevy is your choice; if toughness and design flair, plus optional off-roading ability (in the form of the Trailhawk model) are high on your list, the Jeep is it.

Either one is a modern and capable small utility that competes handily with any competitors of similar size. Both face a formidable challenge from the 2016 Honda HR-V, however.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1096943_jeep-renegade-vs-chevrolet-trax-compare-cars?fbfanpage

Jeep sales continue to impress

The Jeep sales reported yesterday may not have been as dramatic as they were last year, but they were definitely noteworthy.

Last month’s 21.1% growth compared to April 2014 is impressive considering last year’s sales were up 51.6%. That means Jeep sales have risen 82.0% in two years.

Jeep repeated as the top-selling SUV brand in America, easily blowing by Ford, which reported an all-time record for SUV and crossover sales. Jeep was over 9,000 sales ahead of Ford’s best. The Ford Edge set a new April sales record, which was beaten by the Cherokee, Wrangler and Grand Cherokee. The Cherokee and Wrangler also outsold the Ford Explorer and the Grand Cherokee was just 555 sales behind.

April Jeep sales volume gave the brand the largest increase in market share of any brand sold in the U.S. as it set another all-time sales record.

Jeep has set records in every month since November of 2013.

The Cherokee, Wrangler and Grand Cherokee were all in the SUV Top 10 in April and for the first four months of 2015. The Cherokee and Wrangler also made the Top 10 among all light trucks in April as the Cherokee set an all-time sales record and the Wrangler set a new April record.

Ram also made the Top Ten list for trucks and the Top 10 for all vehicles. The Ram pickup added another month as the No. 3 best-selling vehicle in the U.S.

The Chrysler 200 made the April passenger car Top 10, coming in at No. 9. It was the third-best-selling American-badged car in April, outselling the Ford Focus. It was also the third-best-selling Chrysler Group brand vehicle after the Ram and the Cherokee. It edged the Wrangler out by one sale.

The Chrysler 300, despite a drop in deliveries, remained the best-selling American-badged upscale sedan in the U.S. It outsold its rivals from Buick, Cadillac and Lincoln in April.

The Dodge Challenger was just 138 sales behind the Chevrolet Camaro in April.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/05/jeep-sales-continue-to-impress-28578