Archive for the ‘chrysler 200’ Tag

10 WAYS THE NEW 2016 CHRYSLER 200 IS BUILT TO COMPETE AND IMPRESS

The new 2016 Chrysler 200 is built to outshine the competition and to stand out in any crowd. Here are 10 ways this next-generation midsize sedan is setting a new standard for performance and luxury in its segment.

1. We start this list the same way we start the 2016 Chrysler 200 — with standard Keyless Enter ‘n Go™. With the key fob in the vehicle’s proximity, Keyless Enter ‘n Go automatically unlocks the driver’s door when you pull the handle.

2. When it comes to competition, few metrics are as powerful as horsepower, and the 2016 Chrysler 200 has that in spades, with an available best-in-class 295-horsepower1 3.6L Pentastar® V6 engine.

3. There’s also plenty of room on our top 10 list for a spacious interior. The 2016 Chrysler 200 has the most interior storage space in its class, and was named among Ward’s 10 Best Interiors. It’s a first-class cabin in a midsize sedan that features sculpted, comfortable seats, two available sunroofs and a unique center console.

4. With a standard 36 hwy mpg, more than Fusion or Camry, the 2016 Chrysler 200’s 2.4L Tigershark® MultiAir® II four-cylinder engine is engineered to go the distance.

5. The Rotary E-shift with available paddle shifters and sport mode helps redefine the ergonomics and modern style of the center console. The standard nine-speed automatic transmission Rotary E-shift is intuitive to operate and takes up much less interior space than a traditional shifter.

6. This list wouldn’t be complete without mentioning all four wheels. The highly advanced available All-Wheel-Drive (AWD) system is the most technologically advanced AWD system in its class1 and is a fully pre-emptive system that requires no driver input.

7. The seventh selection on this list is illuminating. The 2016 Chrysler 200 lights the way to luxurious, sleek style with standard bifunctional projector headlamps and contemporary LED taillamps. The available Premium Light Group adds High-Intensity Discharge (HID) headlamps with LED Daytime Running Lamps and LED fog lamps.

8. When you maximize your airflow, you quickly discover how aerodynamics can be about more than just aesthetics. The 2016 Chrysler 200’s active grille shutter system enhances aerodynamic performance by redirecting airflow around the front and down the sides of the vehicle.

9. As if the drive alone weren’t entertainment enough, the 2016 Chrysler 200 features an available Uconnect® 8.4 NAV system with premium 3-D navigation, a high-resolution 8.4-inch touchscreen display — the largest touchscreen in its class1 — and available SiriusXM® Satellite Radio. Turn up the volume, and enjoy the ride.

10. Safety is always our top priority, so we saved the best for last. The 2016 Chrysler 200 has up to 60 standard and available safety and security features, including eight standard airbags to help protect occupants in the event of a collision. Available safety features include Full-Speed Forward Collision Warning with Active Braking, LaneSense® Lane Departure Warning with Lane Keep Assist, and the Blind Spot Monitoring System.

Read more at: https://blog.chrysler.com/uncategorized/10-ways-the-new-2016-chrysler-200-is-built-to-compete-and-impress/

Chrysler 200 Vs. Chevrolet Malibu: Compare Cars

The 2016 Chrysler 200 and the 2016 Chevrolet Malibu are sleek, affordable, and full of features–but which one is better for you?

By our numeric rankings, the Chrysler 200 slightly outscores the Chevy Malibu, but that result comes with a couple of caveats. First, it’s largely due to the Chrysler’s excellent safety scores and the absence of data with the new Malibu. The Chevy simply hasn’t yet been tested by either the NHTSA or IIHS, so its score could rise if it performs well.

And while we found few flaws in the Malibu, the 200 has a pair of issues that affect family-car shoppers in particular. Its rear seat simply isn’t large enough for two adults to ride comfortably–the same problem the previous Malibu had–and its nine-speed automatic transmission can be inconsistent, balky, and often unpredictable.

Both of these four-doors are targeted at the heart of the mid-size sedan market. The 200, now in its second model year, replaced an unloved previous generation that dated back to the Chrysler Sebring a decade ago. The Malibu, new this year, also replaces a less-than-successful model that lasted only three years.

The Chrysler 200 has a smoothly rounded shape led by a refined grille and front end. The roofline is long, and tapers down to the tail and a short, flush decklid. It’s a new and elegant appearance for Chrysler that looks more expensive than it is. The 2016 Malibu echoes the handsome Impala in smaller, more svelte proportions. The long new body and rich-looking interior on premium models dispense completely with any historic Chevy references, and it works.

Inside, the Chrysler 200 is superbly detailed, with a waterfall-style dash containing features like sliding cupholders and plenty of cubbies, while the dash itself is covered with top-notch materials, fits, and finishes. A number of design touches are both functional and distinctive—like the rotary shift controller and the pass-through storage area in the center console.

The new Malibu has a more conventional dashboard shape that’s both unified and appealing. The center stack makes space for bigger MyLink infotainment screens, while materials include interesting trim choices—fabric-wrapped panels on less expensive trim levels, metallic-look on others, a leather-looking synthetic wrap on dash and console trim on top models.

While the Chrysler 200 feels roomy in the front seats (if a bit low), it’s less useful in back. The door openings make the rear seat difficult to get into, and the swooping roofline exacts a penalty on riders 6 feet or taller. The Malibu, on the other hand, feels far roomier than its predecessor, due to design decisions that maximize the feeling of interior space. The dash has been lowered and pushed out at the corners; new seats offer better support all around; and there’s much more rear legroom than before. Four larger adults can ride comfortably in the Malibu, not in the 200.

The Chrysler offers two powertrains, a 184-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder or a 295-hp 3.6-liter V-6, both with nine-speed automatic transmissions. All-wheel drive is available with the V-6 only. We’ve found the nine-speed automatic can shift abruptly—especially with the four-cylinder. You’ll find the V-6 has a bit of torque steer unless you opt for all-wheel drive. The 200’s fuel efficiency is lower than many mid-size sedans with larger interiors, and there’s no hybrid or diesel model. The four-cylinder gets 28 mpg combined; switch up to the V-6 and that falls to 23 mpg combined. Add all-wheel drive, and you drop to 22 mpg combined–no better than some mid-size SUVs.

Most Malibu will be powered by a 160-hp 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, driving the front wheels through a six-speed automatic transmission. It’s quiet, composed, and hard to catch flat-footed. High-end models step up to a 250-hp 2.0-liter turbo four, paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission that gives precise, defined gear changes. This top turbo Malibu now feels as quick as predecessors with V-6s, and offers some of the best drivability and refinement in its class. There’s no AWD option, though.

Finally, there’s a Malibu Hybrid, which pairs a 1.8-liter (non-turbo) four-cylinder with a 1.5-kwh battery pack and twin electric motors that effectively operate as a continuously variable transmission. This model makes 182 hp combined and can operate in electric-only mode up to 55 mph. Gasoline Malibus with the 1.5-liter turbo get 31 mpg–a start-stop system is standard–while those with the 2.0-liter turbo come in at 26 mpg combined. The Malibu Hybrid is rated at 47 mpg combined–better than any other hybrid mid-size sedan this year.

The Chrysler 200 gets excellent crash-test ratings from both U.S. agencies. And it offers an available lane-departure warning system, blind-spot monitors, and forward-collision warnings with automatic braking, plus adaptive cruise control and rain-sensing wipers.

We’d expect the Malibu to earn some top-level scores from both the NHTSA and IIHS when test results are released. It too has a long list of available active-safety items–pretty much everything on the 200 plus some newer systems as well, although most are the exclusive domain of the top LT and Premier models.

In the end, the Chrysler 200 edges the Chevy Malibu on styling and an excellent interior, though it’s a very close finish. Pending test results for the Malibu, the 200 also gets the safety crown. The Malibu is far more fuel-efficient in both gasoline versions, not to mention the Hybrid–but those scores don’t factor into our overall rating. Either one is stylish, fresh, well-equipped, and will provide comfortable transport. If you need to put adults in the rear, though, you’ll want the Malibu.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1102132_chrysler-200-vs-chevrolet-malibu-compare-cars

Crossovers replacing sedans: Back to the past

Sergio Marchionne’s comment that the Dodge Dart and Chrysler 200 would be allowed to “run their course” and then be replaced by cars from a “potential partner” caused a range of emotional reactions.

This is not the first time for such thoughts. In the late 1980s, GM, Ford, and Chrysler all lost money on each compact car. Chrysler changed that with the Neon and Cirrus/Stratus, which made hefty profits even while GM and Ford kept losing money. This time, though, insiders claim the company does not have the facilities nor the experienced engineers to make it happen; and even Ford now wants a partner for its sedans.

The earliest mass-produced cars included sedans, but many were the equivalent, in size and shape, of today’s crossovers — the area where Sergio Marchionne wants FCA to focus, at least in North America. Long, low, and sleek appeared as “the look to have” a few years after World War II, for 20-30 years; then the hatchback came into style.

Chrysler sparked a resurgence in the large sedan market in the early 1990s, then helped to rejuvenate midsize and small cars. The moribund large sedan market revived, and sedans in general gained a new lease on life.

Still, the popularity of the low sedan is recent and may be at an end. Ordinary sedans have been getting taller, with the 300 just two inches from the Nissan Juke and six from the Compass and 500L. The 1946 Plymouth was taller than any of them — and the Jeep Cherokee: 68 inches.

So why do many of us, including me, prefer sedans? Is it because they are lower to the ground and handle better? I don’t think so, given how most people drive, and the competent handling of most new crossovers (not to mention the popularity of BMW and Porsche’s crossovers).

Even gas mileage is not really penalized much now, with their larger frontal area countered by aerodynamic design, valve timing, and wide-range transmissions. They also have more space for the large batteries and other gear needed for light and full hybrid systems.

I have had numerous sedans in my life, no SUVs, and just two minivans; my only crossover was a PT Cruiser GT. Still, I can see the attraction of the crossover, especially now that everyone has minivans, SUVs, pickups, and crossovers, which makes visibility rather hard from a low-slung car.

I think the sedan will become more and more specialized over time. Two-door cars (including sedans) used to be extremely common, but they rapidly declined from the 1970s on, and now FCA US only makes the Dodge Challenger, Dodge Viper, Jeep Wrangler, Rams, and Fiat 500 in that form; and even in pickups and Wranglers, the two-door form is less and less popular.

I don’t think this presages the death of Chrysler or Dodge. The 200 and Dart (and Fiat 500) need high incentives to sell. Is replacing them worth delaying rear wheel drive cars for Dodge or large cars and crossovers for Chrysler and Dodge? Mr. Marchionne has a finite number of engineers at hand, and only so many factories. Paying off $5 billion in debt will earn the company more cash than building a new plant.

(I am very, very disappointed that Mr. Marchionne’s pledge that Chrysler would “lead” the engineering of future compact and midsize and large cars has been completely ignored and reneged upon.)

Limited resources, limited time, and a class of car that appears to be disappearing, selling only with large incentives … I can’t say I’d have been able to do anything different.

Or… it’s another trial balloon or an attempt to mis-lead competitors. We are talking about Sergio Marchionne, after all; and his announcements tend not to be set in stone.

Update: When buyers choose sedans, they almost invariably choose imports. Of the top ten 2015 best sellers in the US, there were no American sedans — Camry, Corolla, Accord, Civic and Altima accompanied two imported crossovers (CR-V and RAV4) and the three American pickups. The best selling cars (Camry and Corolla) combined barely outsold Ford’s pickups. In Europe, Fiat’s Panda has grown to challenge its best-seller, the 500; while the 500X, in its first year, nearly matched the declining Punto (both were beaten by the 500L). Fiat’s sales in Europe, 500 aside, are heavily biased in favor of crossovers, vans, and utilities. The same is not true for everyone — over half of Ford’s sales are the Fiesta and Focus.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2016/02/crossovers-replacing-sedans-back-to-the-past-31159

Chrysler celebrates nine decades of driving innovation

It has been nine decades since Walter P. Chrysler founded the car company that bears his name, and today, as it was in the beginning, Chrysler is on the forefront of design and innovation.

By being a leader in these areas, Chrysler has made cutting edge vehicles that are both stylish and fun to drive for customers.

These traits of innovation and cutting edge design at an affordable price can be found today in the Chrysler 200, Chrysler 300 and Chrysler Town & Country.

These modern-day models draw upon the foundation laid more than 90 years ago by Walter P. Chrysler, who was leading Maxwell Motors in 1924 and released the first automobile to carry the Chrysler name, the Chrysler Six. The car featured a six-cylinder engine and four-wheel hydraulic brakes.

This spirit of innovation – and providing a safe vehicle at a fair price – continued after Chrysler founded Chrysler Corporation in 1925.

“He wanted to be a player in the industry,” said FCA US Manager of Historical Archives Brandt Rosenbusch, who stated that Chrysler focused on continuous improvement, firm engineering and building a safe vehicle at a fair price. “He always hoped to have a car bearing his name.”

The company soon introduced cars named after their top speed, such as the Chrysler 72 and the high-end Imperial model that competed against Cadillac.

In the 1930s as the Great Depression gripped the country, the company remained competitive with affordable cars and technological advancements, including “Floating Power,” which reduced the vibration felt from the engine in the body of the car. Chrysler also introduced the downdraft carburetor, automatic spark control and rustproofed, welded steel bodies.

It was also during this decade that the groundbreaking Chrysler Airflow was introduced. The car, which was introduced in 1934, took its design cues from aircraft with aerodynamic features in a teardrop shape.

Walter P. Chrysler pictured with a Chrysler Airflow model.

While it impressed the engineering community, it wasn’t commercially successful. But the new body construction and engine placement signaled a new age of automobile design.

The start of the new decade also marked the end of an era as Walter P. Chrysler died in August 1940. Despite the death of the company founder, Chrysler continued to move forward with innovations, such as the development of a four-speed gearbox with two ranges, the introduction of the Thunderbolt and the Town & Country sedan.

When the nation went to war, Chrysler halted civilian production of automobiles in 1942 and retooled. Among the products Chrysler made for the war effort included the M-4 Sherman tank, “Sea Mule” marine tugs and Chrysler-Bell air raid sirens.

The end of the war in 1945 allowed Chrysler to resume production of civilian vehicles, and led to the release of new, more powerful engines in the 1950s.

In 1951, Chrysler introduced its hemispheric-head V-8 engine – also known as the HEMI, which was initially installed in the Chrysler Saratoga, New Yorker and Imperial. The Chrysler 300 was introduced in 1955 and featured a 300-horsepower HEMI, which not only made it the most powerful full-size car in the world, but also a force to be reckoned with on the NASCAR circuit. The Kiekhaefer Mercury Outboard Racing team won 20 of its 40 NASCAR races.

The company’s entire line of cars was honored in 1957 with Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year” award, and that same year, Chrysler introduced the first rear window defogger and child guard rear door locks.

This focus on design and safety continued into the 1960s as Chrysler moved to unibody construction, which not only improved fuel economy, but also provided greater protection to passengers in a crash. The company also offered the first five-year, 100,000-mile powertrain warranty.

In the 1970s, Chrysler began to offer smaller vehicles in response to fuel shortages and oil embargoes. While the company pivoted on the size of cars, it continued to offer new features, including electronic ignition.

The decade also saw the introduction of actor Ricardo Montalban as the pitchman for the Chrysler Cordoba in 1975, and three years later, Lee Iacocca was named president of Chrysler Corporation.

With the arrival of the 1980s, the company was dealing with a financial crisis, which led to a new generation of vehicles for the company. The Aries and Reliant K-cars were introduced in 1982 along with the front-wheel-drive Chrysler LeBaron. Then, in 1984, a whole new segment was introduced into the automotive industry with the minivan. The front-wheel-drive, compact van created a new segment in the automotive market and became an industry standard in the decades following its release.

The 1990s brought the debut of new sedans, minivan enhancements and the return of a familiar nameplate. The Concorde sedan debuted in 1993 and featured a new “cab forward” design, which created more interior cabin room for passengers. Two years later, Chrysler introduced the mid-size Chrysler Cirrus, which also featured the “cab forward” design.

The third generation of minivan was introduced in 1996 with new features, including a second sliding door for the passenger side Easy-Out roller seats. Chrysler brought back the 300 nameplate in 1999, and the 300M sedan was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year.”

As the decade came to end, Chrysler merged with Daimler and launched a number of new vehicles in the start of the new millennium. The fourth-generation minivan was introduced with new features, such as a power liftgate. In 2001, the PT Cruiser debuted and was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year.” The Chrysler Pacifica was introduced in 2004 and was predecessor to today’s popular crossover segment.

A rear-wheel-drive Chrysler 300 was introduced in 2005 and was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year.”

After undergoing bankruptcy, and becoming part of FIAT, the company introduced the new Chrysler 200 mid-size sedan in 2014, which included a number of affordable luxury features, such as lane departure warning, heated steering wheel and an all-wheel-drive system.

Ninety years ago, Chrysler founded what was known as “Detroit’s engineering company,” according to Rosenbusch, and that founding principle has remained in the company’s DNA with powerful engines, the latest in passenger safety technology and even creating a new segment – the minivan.

“(Chrysler) engineers have continued to develop and bring innovations into the Chrysler brand and models,” Rosenbusch said.

Stay tuned to see what Chrysler brand has to offer over the next 90 years.

Read more at: http://blog.fcanorthamerica.com/2015/09/24/chrysler-celebrates-nine-decades-of-driving-innovation/

2015 Chrysler 300 has been named one of KBB.com’s ten most comfortable cars under $30,000

The 2015 Chrysler 300 has been named one of KBB.com’s ten most comfortable cars under $30,000. The editors wrote, “Chrysler’s big and bold full-size sedan recalls the glamour and ease of yesteryear in a car that offers all of today’s modern amenities,”

The base price of a 2015 Chrysler 300 Limited is $32,690, including destination charges, but incentives bring it below the $30,000 threshold. A comparably equipped Chevrolet Impala 2LT is $31,110, and it doesn’t have the 300’s outstanding V6/8-speed combination.

In thousands of test miles, many with four adults and luggage, Allpar testing has found that, regardless of trim level, the Chrysler 300 a is standout among non-luxury cars, easily surpassing comparable Ford and GM cars in total passenger comfort over long distances. Even brand-agnostic drivers praise the car’s comfort and driveability.

Often-neglected rear-seat passengers, including those six feet tall, have plenty of room, and the Chrysler 300’s formal roofline makes dignified entry and exit no problem, an advantage over the Dodge Charger.

Allpar real-world testing has shown the Chrysler 300 with the Pentastar V6 cruises effortlessly even at the 80 miles per hour allowed on West Texas highways. We have achieved an easy 33 mpg on long trips at 70-75 mph.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/07/is-chrysler-300-one-the-most-comfortable-cars-under-30k-29271

2017 Chrysler 100 Rendered

Susan Rand has provided a quick rendering of the Chrysler 100, based on the Fiat Aegean concept, and assuming very few exterior changes for North America. It has the current “wheel-well” sidelights, which conform to both American and European standards, and while it uses a Chrysler grille, keeps the indentations of the Fiat concept.

chrysler-100

 

The Chrysler 100 is reportedly to be based on SUSW, a new American version of the old Fiat-GM SCSS platform. It will likely have all American engines, perhaps limited to the 2.0 turbo and 2.0 non-turbo, though a 1.4 Fiat turbo might be used to get high fuel mileage in the ads. European versions are to get engines ranging from 95 to 120 horsepower, including diesels.

Allpar expects the car to have the first nine-speed automatic transmission in its class, with better acceleration and economy than the current Dodge Dart, which will also end up with a nine-speed.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/06/2017-chrysler-100-rendered-28848

Chrysler compact still coming

The Chrysler compact car, normally referred to as the 100, is still on the way, according to both the company’s strategic plan and insiders.

Some believe the forthcoming Chrysler is closely linked to the new Fiat Linea replacement, which will be unveiled shortly. It seems likely that most of the work will be done by Fiat, which traditionally has more expertise in small cars, especially since Chrysler itself has its hands full with yet more revisions to its pickups, work on next-generation large cars, Dart upgrades, nine-speed fixes, the next-generation Compass, new minivans, possibly bringing over a Ram version of the big Daily commercial van, and other projects.

At minimum, Chrysler is likely to retune the suspension to fit American roads, and adjust the interior and exterior styling to match American tastes. Unfortunately, the Microsoft-based Fiat Blue & Me system, now renamed UConnect, may be the only connectivity system available, at least on lower models.

The company recently trademarked the Hornet name, first used by Hudson for its only “small” car, then used by AMC (the company formed by the merger of Hudson and Nash), and made famous by the movie Cars. So far, there has been no indication of what the name might be used on — they may replace Dart or Avenger with Hornet, or set up a midsized, rear-wheel-drive hatchback or coupe with the name — but it’s possible, albeit unlikely, that it will be used for the small compact Chrysler.

The launch of the upcoming Chrysler car might be timed so that it comes close to the relaunch of the Dodge Dart. Some observers believe that the Dart will be made into more of a niche car, perhaps with the lowest performance version matching today’s Dart GT, or having a turbocharged “Hurricane” engine, while the Chrysler 100 will cater to the mainstream.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/05/chrysler-compact-still-coming-28662

Must-Have Car Features for Expectant Parents

There may be no greater joy in life than knowing a newborn is on the way.

Soon, you’ll get to experience all the excitement and bliss that being a parent brings. But with this wonder comes great responsibility. The entire well-being of another human will rest in your hands. It’s time to evaluate some things in your life and make a few changes.

Remember that car you bought fresh out of school that was some combination of being affordable, cool, unique and youthful? Now it’s deteriorating into a pile of scap metal in your driveway. You gamble with whether you will or will not make it to your destination or not on every trip you take. Getting stranded on the side of the freeway is one thing, but having it happen with an infant aboard will be a nightmare. Looks like it’s time for an upgrade.

So what should a new parent look for in an automobile? Well a lot of things, really. But to help any soon-to-be progenitors, we have broken down the new car checklist into three key areas. First, there are those things that need to be in a vehicle to make transporting a baby safe and easy. Second are things that aren’t quite a necessity, but would make your time behind the wheel as a parent a lot less stressful. Third, there are the items that are icing on the cake; the added perks that parents might not need, but will gladly take if offered.

Must-Haves

The most important thing you can do as a parent is keep your child safe. This is especially true when it comes to cars and driving. Regardless of how skilled you are behind the wheel, there is always the unknown factor of weather, road conditions and other motorists that could result in a crash. Modern vehicles have jumped leaps and bounds in terms of crash worthiness compared to older cars, even within the past five years. A modern car will keep its occupants much safer than models from the past. But some are still safer than others. To check and compare how well prospective new vehicle purchases rate in crash testing, visit the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety database or the one offered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Act.

A newborn is going to spend the next several years in child safety seats, so a vehicle with a rear seat is essential. Although most four- and five-person coupes do come equipped with child seat anchors, accessing them and the child can be a nightmare because there isn’t a door opening directly beside the rear seat. When your child is an infant and in a rear facing child seat this can be quite the struggle.

It’s best to look for a four-door vehicle because the easier accessed rear seat area will be easier to deal with. If your rear facing child seat has already been purchased, take it along when new car shopping so it can be test fitted to the backseat area. Pay attention to a vehicle’s official rear legroom measurement as these safety seats are deceivingly long. Not all smaller cars can accommodate one without forcing the front passenger seat to be placed uncomfortably close to the windshield.

Rear doors are also important when it comes to size and operation. Vehicles like a Range Rover L with the extended wheelbase give parents all the space in the world to secure their bundles of joy to the back seats, but the rear doors also require all the space in the world to open, which is a challenge in parking lots. When looking at new cars, see how far out the doors open in relation to the access they give to the backseat area. As well, the angle in which they swing open is important as the closer to 90 degrees the better. Still, there is one champion when it comes to rear vehicle doors for parents: the sliding door. Not only does it give them full access to their kids, but it also takes up minimal space when opened.

Nice-to-Haves

With the essentials taken care of, many other automotive features can help ease the transition into parenthood. Chances are you’ll become more distracted behind the wheel now that an extra, highly demanding passenger is frequently aboard. Vehicles with the latest active safety systems like lane departure warning, blind spot monitoring and collision detection could be a life saver if you stop paying attention, even for a split second.

Babies call for a lot of stuff like strollers, pack and play cribs, diaper bags and more. A car with a large trunk is good, but one with a lift gate hatchback is better. Not only is it easier to load odd-shaped items into a hatchback, by usually there is more cargo room in a hatchback and items placed back there stay as warm or cool as everything else in the vehicle. Taking things a step further, a power lift gate, power trunk or even power side doors

will further help a new parent whose hands will inevitably be full each time they approach the vehicle.

And when it comes to loading a child and their gear into a car, a vehicle’s height is important. Crossovers continue to gain popularity with new parents due partially to their load height. SUVs usually sit too high, requiring some people to have to step up into the vehicle to secure their child in a safety seat. What-to-Look-for-in-a-Car-with-a-Baby-on-the-Way-07.jpgRegular cars, on the other hand, sit too low and force parents to hunch over in backbreaking slouches as they secure the safety belts.

While discussing access, safety anchors that are easy to reach for the child seats are a huge plus. Some vehicles require a lot of work to uncover and use these clips. While you’re at it, try folding the rear seats down to see how easy it is to do when children are not occupying them for added utility.

Finally, keeping the sun out of your child’s eyes is important, especially ones too small to relate any discomfort to you. A vehicle with factory or dealer installed rear window tint is good, but one with built in roll-up sunshades is better. This isn’t as unusual as it once was either as several minivans, crossovers and sedans are now offering this feature.

Icing on the Cake

Of course, there are some other items that will make life even easier on new parents, like extra cup holders for kid’s snacks and food as well as excess storage bins for other random items. Some vehicles now include a secondary wraparound rear view mirror so a driver can take a quick look back on their kids without having to turn all the way around or moving the regular rear view mirror down.

Removable rear headrests are a nice bonus as they make installing child safety seats much easier and built-in rear video screens can help entertain little ones on longer trips.

Ultimately though, it all comes down to what is most important to you and what you can afford. There are many choices out there that are great, child friendly vehicles. As long as all the Must Haves are checked off as well as a good portion of the Nice to Haves, you should be fine. Happy shopping and good luck with the new baby!

Read more at: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2015/01/must-have-car-features-for-expectant-parents.html

All-New 2015 Chrysler 200 | Named Top Safety Pick+ by IIHS

We’ve known all along that the All-New 2015 Chrysler 200 is a great vehicle. Now we have the independent ratings to prove that it’s among the safest on the road.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has named the All-New 2015 Chrysler 200 a 2014 Top Safety Pick+, its highest rating. “The 200 aced the challenging small overlap front test with a good rating in every measurement category,” said IIHS President Adrian Lund. “Chrysler should also be commended for offering forward collision warning with autonomous braking on this mainstream midsize car. Our research shows that these systems are effective in preventing some kinds of crashes from happening altogether.”

IIHS testing simulates a number of potential collisions, including a side impact with a large SUV or pickup truck, front moderate-offset impact, roof-crush consistent with a rollover, a rear collision capable of inducing whiplash, a new small-offset frontal impact and new crash prevention evaluation. In the small overlap test, IIHS notes that “the driver’s space was maintained well, and injury measures recorded on the dummy indicated a low risk of any significant injuries in a real-world crash of this severity.”

The All-New 2015 Chrysler 200 is a showcase of advanced safety and security technology, offering a comprehensive array of driver warning and assist systems and state-of-the-art occupant restraints, and that’s not all: “With a standard nine-speed transmission, innovative available all-wheel-drive system and 60 safety and security features, the IIHS Top Safety Pick+ rating for the new 200 is the icing on the cake for customers, giving them added peace of mind,” said Al Gardner, President and CEO — Chrysler Brand, Chrysler Group LLC.

Experience the All-New 2015 Chrysler 200 in person by visiting Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram or Dick Scott Motor Mall.

As read on: http://blog.chrysler.com/vehicles/200/new-2015-chrysler-200-named-top-safety-pick-iihs/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=KMAug2614facebook1&ism=KMAug2614facebook1

Stop, Start, Save – Fuel-Saving Technology Standard on Jeep Cherokee

Chrysler Group is offering fuel-saving Engine Stop-Start (ESS)
technology as standard equipment on certain models of the award-winning
2015 Jeep Cherokee mid-size SUV and all-new 2015 Chrysler 200 mid-size
sedan.

Jeep Cherokee customers who choose the available 3.2-liter Pentastar
V-6, and Chrysler 200 customers who opt for the 2.4-liter Tigershark
I-4, and will experience estimated fuel-economy improvements of up to
three percent, compared with the conventional vehicle-engine pairings.

“We’re taking highly efficient engines and upping the ante to further
benefit our customers,” said Mike Duhaime, Global Director-Electrified
Powertrain Propulsion Systems. “ESS leverages intricate control
strategies to deliver a superior driving experience, as well as the
expected fuel-savings and emissions-reduction.”

ESS applications in the Jeep Cherokee and Chrysler 200 and will
account for an estimated C02 emissions-reduction of up to three percent.

Availability in the popular Jeep Cherokee is scheduled for third
quarter. ESS arrives the following quarter in the all-new Chrysler 200.

ESS works this way:

– Engine controls constantly monitor vehicle speed

– When the vehicle brakes to a stop, fuel flow is cut and engine turns off – events that save gas and reduce emissions

– Beefier batteries maintain other vehicle systems so in-cabin comfort is unaffected

– When the brake pedal is released, the engine automatically restarts and the nine-speed automatic transmission, the segment-exclusive
nine-speed automatic transmission is engaged – all within 0.3 seconds

If a driver chooses to forgo the benefits of ESS, the feature can be
deactivated with the push of a button, and then reactivated.

Efficiency and refinement are hallmarks of the Tigershark and Pentastar engine families. ESS just complements these attributes.

The Cherokee’s available 271-hp 3.2-liter Pentastar V-6 is derived
from the acclaimed 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6, named three times one of
Ward’s 10 Best Engines. The smaller-displacement V-6 helps the Cherokee
deliver fuel-economy improvements of up to 30 percent, compared with the
model it replaces.

Individual exhaust-manifold runners are integrated into the aluminum
cylinder-head casting, a key Pentastar-family differentiator. This
design feature reduces weight and affords packaging benefits.

The 24-valve engine’s 10.7:1 compression ratio aids in lowering fuel
consumption and improves performance while its variable-displacement oil
pump further reduces parasitic losses to maximize fuel economy. The
pump is programmed to operate as needed, staying in low-pressure mode
below 3,500 rpm, and then bumping up pressure as demand follows
engine-speed.

The high-tech transmission – which also comes standard in the Jeep
Cherokee – dispenses power smoothly for elevated refinement. Such
performance is made possible because the ratio steps between its gears
are smaller than those of other transmissions.

The Jeep Cherokee has earned multiple media accolades, from Rocky
Mountain Automotive Press Association’s SUV of the Year to 2014 Canadian
Utility Vehicle of the Year, courtesy of the Automobile Journalists
Association of Canada (AJAC).

As read on: http://www.chryslergroup360.com/featured_news/stop-start-save/