Archive for the ‘r/t’ Tag

50 Years of Charger: Part 4 of 5 | The 2006 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968, 1969 and 1970 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 2006 Charger, with one final blog post to follow on the 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 2006 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

Following a nearly two-decade hiatus, Dodge Charger roared back onto American roadways in 2006. This sixth-generation model took cues from its forbearers of the muscle car era, and put a modern spin on the iconic nameplate. The Dodge Charger, in its first year back on the blacktop, was available in SE, SXT, R/T, R/T with Road/Track Performance Group, Daytona R/T and SRT8 versions.

The true excitement of the 2006 Dodge Charger is that the muscle car giant returned with a focus on power and performance. The SXT model came equipped with a 3.5L V6 engine, 5-speed automatic transmission with AutoStick® manual shifting feature, all-speed traction control, as well as ABS and electronic stability control.

The 2006 Charger also saw the introduction of all-wheel drive. Additional power was available with the Charger R/T, which packed the punch of a 340-horsepower 5.7L HEMI® V8 mated to a 5-speed automatic transmission. And at the top of the line, the 2006 Charger SRT8 flew off the line with a 425-horsepower 6.1L HEMI® V8 engine.

For its part, the 2006 Dodge Charger Daytona R/T was equipped with a high-output version of 5.7L HEMI V8 engine that boasted 350 horsepower, a retro HEMI decal on the hood and Daytona decals on the rear fenders. The Daytona R/T also included a special front fascia with a chin spoiler and a black rear spoiler.

The exterior appearance of the 2006 Dodge Charger paid homage to the past with reminiscent stamped hood and side panels, and brought its own unique style as a four-door sedan. The SRT8 version featured exterior upgrades such as a special grille, rear spoiler, front fascia and engine cover, larger exhaust tips, and unique colors and exterior trim.

The modern interior of the 2006 Dodge Charger was designed for comfort and loaded with technology. Features included air conditioning, CD player, tilt and telescoping steering column, remote keyless entry and power locks, mirrors and windows. The SRT8 took the interior and technology to yet another level, with standard and optional features including heated front seats with perforated suede inserts, automatic climate control, a performance steering gear, power-adjustable pedals, GPS navigation system, 322-watt audio system, sunroof, rear-seat DVD entertainment system and body-color interior trim.

From highways to racetracks (in 2006, the Dodge Charger silhouette design returned to stock car racing) the 2006 Dodge Charger claimed its place at the top of the muscle car scene. Since then, for the past decade, there’s been no looking back.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-2006/

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50 Years of Charger: Part 3 of 5 | The 1970 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968 and 1969 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 1970 Charger, with blog posts to follow on the 2006 Charger and 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 1970 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

The 1970 Dodge Charger stands apart from the other model years in large part due to its distinct design elements. The grille is completely encircled with wraparound chrome, and the headlamps were hidden from view, in conjunction with the removal of the center divider from the ’69 model. The 1970 R/T model remains easy to identify thanks to its rear-facing scoops mounted on the doors. New colors were also available in 1970, including Top Banana, Panther Pink, Sublime, Burnt Orange, Go Mango and Plum Crazy.

On the interior, several notable changes and updates helped make the 1970 Charger one stunning muscle car to behold. High-back bucket seats were added in leather or vinyl and the ignition switch was moved to the steering column. In the 1970 Charger SE edition, interior features included a woodgrain steering wheel and instrument panel, new pistol grip shifter, pedal trim, turn signal indicators in the hood and, a first for the Charger, a bench seat. The 1970 Charger R/T also stood apart with 14-inch wheels with raised white letter or white-sidewall tires, and a red bumblebee or longitudinal stripe on the rear.

The 1970 Dodge Charger R/T roared down the road with a standard 440 Magnum V8 with a four-barrel carburetor and dual exhaust, and included an R/T suspension package and heavy-duty brakes. Other available options for under the hood were the 390-horsepower 440 Six Pack engine (a first for Charger) and the earth-shaking 425-horsepower 426 HEMI® engine. Neither of these behemoths came with an air conditioning option, as the focus was on power and power alone. The standard 1970 Charger also included a Slant Six engine as an option.

The 1970 Dodge Charger: Racing and Reception

The 1970 model continued to build on Charger’s prowess on the racetrack. Ten stock car racing victories earned the No. 71 Charger Daytona the championship title that year, and helped bolster nationwide notoriety for the already famed Charger.

The 1970 Dodge Charger, particularly the SE model, is widely considered the most luxurious of that year’s Scat Pack, and it’s not hard to see why — with wood accents, shifter and bench seat. Production in 1970 was just under 50,000 total vehicles.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-1970/

50 Years of Charger: Part 2 of 5 | The 1969 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ’66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 1969 Charger, with blog posts to follow on the 1970 Charger, 2006 Charger and 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 1969 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

The 1969 Dodge Charger was distinct in appearance from the 1968 model, most notably because of the new center divider on the front grille, and on the back, longitudinal taillights that replaced the circular design from the previous year. In addition, a new Special Edition (SE) trim line offered chrome rocker moldings and an available sunroof, as well as leather front seat inserts and woodgrain interior details on the steering wheel and dash. On the R/T, the bumblebee stripes were still available as one wide stripe and two smaller stripes.

Under the hood, a 290-horsepower 2-barrel 383 engine and a 330-horsepower 4-barrel 383 engine were available, as well as a 335-horsepower 383 Magnum painted Chrysler high-performance orange in the Super Bee model. In addition, the Six Pack, introduced in 1969, took the 440 Magnum and added a high-rise manifold capable of moving over 1,200 cubic feet of air per minute to accommodate three Holley two-barrel carburetors (thus the number six). The Six Pack produced a roaring sound and was rated at 390 horsepower at 4,700 rpm and 490 lb.-ft. of torque at 3,200 rpm. Additional Six Pack performance features included HEMI® engine valve springs and a recalibrated ignition distributor with dual breaker points.

The Six Pack performance was close to that of the 426 HEMI engine, and at approximately half the cost. To introduce the new high-powered engine, a special 1969 Dodge Super Bee model was developed with a flat-black fiberglass hood and matching black wheels sans hubcaps.

Fame on the Racetrack

The 1969 Charger was a huge success in the showroom and on the roadway, and also made a splash in American motorsports with the introduction of the original Dodge Charger Daytona, known as the “Winged Warrior.” The speedster broke tradition with its unique front end, engineered to help reduce drag, and bested the competition with speed and stability that was unmatched in stock car racing.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-1969/

50 Years of Charger: Part 1 of 5 | The 1968 Dodge Charger

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 1968 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engines

The 1968 Dodge Charger built on the reputation and successes of the 1966 model, maintaining the soul and inspiration of the vehicle while introducing new design and performance upgrades. Perhaps most notably, the 1968 Dodge Charger was the first to feature the eye-catching Coke Bottle styling, with a curvier front fender and rear quarter panel.

Designer Richard Sias was the mastermind behind the 1968 Charger’s groundbreaking Coke Bottle styling, and Harvey J. Winn was responsible for the front- and rear-end sheet metal. The 1968 Charger replaced the electric motor rotating headlights with a vacuum-operated cover, while staying true to form and retaining the full-width hidden-headlamp grille. Dual circular taillamps replaced the full-width versions, and dual scallops were added to the doors and hood.

Not to be outdone by the Coke Bottle exterior, the interior of the 1968 Charger saw its own upgrades and changes. For starters, the center armrest was removed, along with the rear bucket seats, which were replaced with fixed rear seats. The tachometer was no longer a standard feature, and conventional gauges were added, as well as a vinyl mat in the trunk.

Of course, power is the thing, and the 1968 Dodge Charger had that in spades, featuring a standard 318-cubic-inch (5.2-liter) 2-bbl V8 engine, and later that year, a 225-cubic-inch (3.7-liter) slant-six engine. For those who opted for the high-performance package, the 1968 Dodge Charger R/T boasted a 375-horsepower 440 Magnum or the optional 425-horsepower 426 HEMI engine.

1968 also marked the introduction of the “Scat Pack” and its cartoon ad campaign. The Charger R/T came to be recognized for its bumblebee stripes, not to mention its powerful engine. Even Hollywood took notice; the 1968 Dodge Charger R/T 440 Magnum was featured in one of the big screen’s most iconic car chase scenes.

With plenty of power under the hood and an updated design, the 1968 Dodge Charger found its way into movies, auto shows and driveways all across America. The gauntlet was laid, and the most formidable competition would prove to be the following year’s model. Stay tuned for an upcoming blog post on the 1969 Dodge Charger.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-1968/

Test Drive a Dodge Challenger Today

Strap yourself in and get ready for the ride of your life when you’re driving the 2016 Dodge Challenger for sale in Plymouth, MI. This legendary muscle car has top-notch power that gives you heart-racing performance every time its engine roars to life. To see this beast for yourself in person, take a quick trip over to Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram.

Under the hood of the 2016 Challenger is the option between four robust engines, each of which is more powerful than the last. It comes standard with the 3.6L V6 Pentastar® engine on its base trim level to balance out power with responsible fuel economy. It offers 305 horsepower and 268 lb.-ft. of torque, and you’ll be able to pass up gas stations with ease as it records 30 MPG hwy1. To kick things up a notch when you need a burst of speed on I-275, upgrade to the 5.7L HEMI® V8 engine for a raucous 375 horsepower and 410 lb.-ft. of torque.

interior

Even more power awaits with the available 6.4L HEMI® V8 engine. It has a best-in-class2 485 horsepower to go with 475 lb.-ft. of torque. For when you’re out on the track, this engine will get you to a sizzling top speed3 of 182 MPH. The cream of the crop, however, is the supercharged 6.2L V8 HEMI® SRT Hellcat engine. It is the most powerful muscle car ever4, and you’ll have a rush of adrenaline every time you hit the gas with its 707 horsepower and 650 lb.-ft. of torque. On any of these engines, you have the option of between the TorqueFlite® 8-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters, or a 6-speed manual transmission.

Slide into the interior of the 2016 Dodge Challenger for sale in Plymouth, MI, and you’ll find an area that is built to make driving more comfortable for you, the driver. It has a class-exclusive4 7-inch reconfigurable Driver Information Digital Cluster Display that can offer a variety of vehicle information, including 0-60 MPH time3, reaction time, and a lap timer. For entertainment, the 2016 Challenger offers an available Sound Group with six Alpine® speakers and a 276-watt amplifier. For an even better listening experience, upgrade to Sound Group II with nine Alpine® speakers, a subwoofer, and a 506-watt amplifier. With the available Uconnect® 8.4 NAV, you’ll have a class-exclusive4 8.4-inch touchscreen to host all of your favorite apps, navigation, and more!

The 2016 Dodge Challenger for sale in Plymouth, MI, is a muscle car that is able to back up its notoriety with incredible performance. But the Challenger has so much more to offer than just raw power! Take it for a test drive today at Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, located at 684 W. Ann Arbor Rd. in Plymouth, MI!

The dual-minivan plan, revisited

Rumors from Windsor suggested first that the current “RT” minivan body would continue for some years alongside the new “RU,” and then that it would be dropped as soon as the new designs came out — in Chrysler form only.

Where is Reid [Bigland]? If it was up to Reid, we’d be manufacturing up until 2250. There are technical reasons why that car cannot be sold for a much longer period of time than the current time. There are regulations that are coming into effect in 2017 that are going to restrict or are going to require a substantial amount of investment into the old architecture to make the problem go away. Or they’re just not assailable.

That, plus the combination of some of the inherent inefficiency of the architecture and the powertrain, will make the car just not square, to square the numbers. We’ll try to keep it alive as long as we can.

As for the next generation minivans:

Oh it’s done, yes. We’re tuning up now . . . there are bodies that are meandering around Auburn Hills out of the pilot plant. The parts are visible….You’ll see it at the show on January ’16.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/01/the-dual-minivan-plan-revisited

What can we expect from the 2015 Dodge Charger R/T

The new Dodge Charger R/T is like the high-school athlete whose brothers have gone on to star in college and pro ranks. Indeed, with the formidable Hellcat V-8 and the SRT 392 hogging the spotlight, the kid brother’s credentials pale. After all, the 392 packs 485 horsepower and the Hellcat lays a 707-horse smackdown, heady numbers that could make one perceive the R/T’s 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 as a little tame.

Do not be deceived. Unless you have an insatiable appetite for shredding tires, the 5.7’s output—370 horsepower, 395 lb-ft of torque—will satisfy most needs for speed. Okay, the R/T is governed to a mere 145 mph versus the Hellcat’s 204, but you’ll still reach the Chinese takeout place before they pack up your food, and 5.1 seconds to 60 mph will leave most sedans gasping for breath.

Track Pack Plus

Surprisingly, given its mass, the R/T has a good dynamic résumé. The driver is aware of the substantial, two-plus-ton curb weight, but the Charger’s chassis tuning mitigates that number very well.

Thanks to a rigid unibody, the basic Charger R/T nicely manages yaw, pitch, and roll. But those who love to drive are advised to get the 29R Customer Preferred pack, which upgrades the car, as it did on our test example, to Road & Track spec. Doing so means a cornucopia of goodies including the Super Track Pak sport suspension; the Road & Track Performance Group with more aggressive throttle mapping, revised traction control (higher intervention threshold), heavy-duty brakes, 20-inch aluminum wheels, and sportier rubber (245/45 Goodyear Eagle RS-A2 all-season performance tires); and Dodge’s Performance Pages software, which allows the driver to track acceleration, cornering, and a variety of other numeric markers.

There’s a lot of other desirable stuff crammed into the 29R package, too, including nappa leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats (heated front chairs come on every R/T), a power tilt and telescope steering column, a heated steering wheel, power-adjustable pedals, and heated power mirrors, to hit a few high spots. At $3000 for all the foregoing equipment, it’s a must-have bargain collection.

Augmented by all the Track Pack goodies, the R/T dances even more remarkably well for a big car, the combination of quick (2.5 turns lock-to-lock), gratifyingly accurate electric power steering and firm suspension making it easy to place the car precisely where the driver wishes. And there’s enough grip to inspire confidence in very fast cornering.

It’s also very easy to develop affection for the eight-speed automatic. Shifts in the Charger aren’t quite as whap-whap quick as those delivered by some of the very best dual-clutch automatics, but one could call them deliberate, and in manual mode the transmission will hold the selected gear against redline—no autonomous upshifting.

The eight-speed is new for this year and slightly enhances EPA fuel economy versus last year’s five-speed unit, adding 1 mpg to the car’s city rating. That means 16 mpg in urban environs and 25 on the highway, on midgrade fuel, which is pretty good for a big V-8. We averaged 18 mpg in mixed driving. Would economy go up if the Hemi were fitted with direct fuel injection? Probably. But fuel economy isn’t a high priority for Hemi fans, nor for cars operating in this performance realm.

The car doesn’t have many demerits, and those it does have aren’t deal-breakers. We’ve already mentioned mass; cutting the curb weight would further improve handling and efficiency. The suspension tuning that gives the R/T its athletic reflexes can be a little stiff on gnarly pavement, and while grip—0.86 g—isn’t exactly a weak suit, it could be improved by a set of real summer performance tires.

Such tires would probably improve the braking performance, too, as 170 feet from 70 mph is long for a car with sports-sedan pretense. We detected no real fade in the system, but the pedal did begin to go a little soft after repeated hard stops.

The Right Stuff

Considered in standard trim and before its 2015 refresh, the Charger ranked behind mainstream sedan offerings like the Toyota Avalon and the Chevy Impala in our comparison test. But for the owner who wants a strong performance component in the everyday drive, the new R/T has the right stuff for an agreeable $33,990 starting MSRP.

Our test car got expensive quickly, however. In addition to the $3000 Preferred/R&T stuff (again, don’t leave the showroom without it), it had $6975 of additional options. These included $995 for Beats audio gear; $1795 for the Technology Group (rain-sensing wipers, auto high beams, and safety nannies); $295 for Driver Confidence equipment (blind-spot and cross-path warning, exterior puddle lamps); and $695 for navigation, infotainment goodies, and a backup camera. Our car also was fitted with a power sunroof ($1195), Redline Red paint ($500), and a black-painted roof ($1500).

The grand total came to $43,965. That’s more than the cheap-speed $40,990 R/T Scat Pack, although still well shy of the $48,380 Charger SRT 392. (The wild and wooly Hellcat opens at $64,990.) In any case, there do seem to be some opportunities for whittling. Okay, the red paint is probably important, as it emphasizes the aggressive styling. On the other hand, do you really need the safety technology, puddle lamps, or the black roof?

Options notwithstanding, this Charger figures as an underappreciated performance bargain in a full-size sedan. It’s everyday useful and ready to rock every day.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-charger-r-t-hemi-test-review

New Platinum, LX minivans

For 2015, Chrysler will add new minivans to both the top and the bottom of the price charts.

A new Limited Platinum actually lowers the top starting price of Chrysler minivans to $40,990, including destination. It includes everything in the 2014 Chrysler Town & Country Limited, but adds a power folding third row seat and the power sunroof — at less than the price of the 2014 Limited.

At the bottom end, the LX (late availability) will match the Caravan R/T’s starting price of $30,990. The Touring, S, and Touring-L continue essentially unchanged, at $31,760, $33,990, and $35,460, respectively (including destination).

Dodge Caravan starts at $21,890. The Chrysler models come with many features standard, and more elaborate interior and exterior styling. Both share a six-speed automatic and 3.6 liter V6 gasoline engine.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/08/new-platinum-lx-minivans

No 2015 Super Bee

Allpar member “redriderbob” wrote that he spoke with Tim Kuniskis at the Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat launch; Mr. Kiniskis, who heads Dodge, said that the SRT brand structure is too confusing with SRT Core models, Super Bees, special edition packages on Charger, and such; it is difficult for the customer to know what kind of models they are looking at, and it is hard for sales staff at dealerships to learn the chaos.

According to the member, the Super Bee’s last year will be 2014, and he is “aligning the Charger and Challenger options to be identical.” The Super Bee and Core will be replaced by the Scat Pack 392, which “adds more content at a lower, more affordable price for the customer. It will be the best value four-door muscle car on the market.”

When asked if the days of the 392 were limited, he stated, “Absolutely not! People that don’t have the need for the extreme power of the Hellcat, but want a great handling muscle car with great power will be able to have the regular SRT392 model. There will be enough content in both Charger and Challenger SRT 392 models to keep them very separate and desirable for the customer who wants it.”

When asked why Dodge had not said much about 2015 Chargers other than the R/T and police pursuit editions, Mr. Kuniskis said they wanted to fully focus on the launch of the 2015 Dodge Challenger, and that the rest of the Charger lineup would be unveiled in the next month or so. All Chargers other than Hellcat (slated for January production) will be available by the end of the year.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/08/no-2015-super-bee