Archive for the ‘polaris’ Tag

New Polaris Sportsman 6×6 BIG BOSS 570 EPS

Polaris Industries Inc. introduced the all-new 2017 Sportsman® 6×6 BIG BOSS 570 EPS all-terrain vehicle (ATV) to the company’s powerful off-road lineup. The new six-wheel drive BIG BOSS offers more traction, range, capacity and versatility to take on the most demanding off-road conditions, and was built for customers desiring to reach the most remote destinations.

“The all new BIG BOSS offers ultimate utility for our customers who use ATVs for epic hunting trips or need to work in the harshest of conditions,” said Steve Smith, director of Product Planning, Polaris Off-Road Vehicles. “Unlike any other ATV, it is designed specifically for customers who demand ultimate traction, massive payload and carrying versatility. This vehicle takes on the biggest jobs, anywhere.”

The BIG BOSS is the industry’s first 6×6 ATV built for two people and it has the ability to haul incredible amounts of gear with the industry’s largest payload, a highly configurable Lock & Ride® cargo system, and integrated front storage.

The Sportsman 6×6 BIG BOSS 570 EPS has a longer chassis to accommodate more cargo and a second person. The exclusive, fully integrated passenger system includes a raised second seat for more visibility, as well as hand grips and foot rests. Behind the passenger, an 800-lb. (362 kg) capacity gas-assist dump box with steel Lock & Ride bed rails; dual rear racks with integrated 5-gallon bucket mounts; and six high-mounted, tie-down points ensure the biggest loads are secure. Integrated box dividers allow the dump box to be configured into two different sections while the stake pockets add height to the box to carry more gear. Up front, the vehicle provides even more carrying capacity with the industry’s only integrated, 6.5-gal (24.61 L) front storage and factory-installed rack extender that can carry 90 lbs. (40 kg). The vehicle also is equipped with a standard 2-in (5.08 cm) receiver, and has a 1,500-lb. (680 kg) towing capacity to haul out big game or work harder on the job site.

For additional versatility, the BIG BOSS can be customized for the biggest hunts and most remote jobs all year round with more than 30 Polaris Engineered Accessories™. The vehicle offers the ultimate in fast and easy accessory integration with the industry’s only integrated winch and plow mounts. Accessories such as the new Yukon Adventure Rack add height, additional tie-down points and more security to the rear box; and the convertible, dry storage accessory box, which can be used in either the one-up or two-up riding position, allows the BIG BOSS to be even more versatile.

To travel to the most remote places, a vehicle must be fuel efficient and have the ability to conquer the most-demanding terrain while keeping the operator comfortable. The BIG BOSS does all three.

For ultimate range and proven performance, the BIG BOSS features the highly efficient, liquid-cooled, single-cylinder Pro-Star® 570 engine, delivering 44 horsepower and plenty of torque for working, hunting and traversing tough terrain. The engine features dual overhead cams and four valves, along with an automotive-style Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) system for flawless starts and smooth operation in varied temperature and altitude. The vehicle boasts the industry’s largest fuel capacity at 6.75 gal (25.6 L), about 50-percent more than most ATVs, and an industry-leading range of up to 130 miles (209 km) ensuring the operator can focus on the hunt or getting the job done.

To tackle the toughest terrain, the BIG BOSS relies on Polaris’ proven and legendary All-Wheel Independent Suspension with the most rear suspension travel of any 6×6 (8.2 in [20.83 cm] front, 9.5 in [24.93 cm] rear) and 11.5 in. (29.21 cm) of ground clearance. The vehicle features 4WD and 6WD options with the flip of a switch, and the industry’s fastest-engaging High Performance On-Demand True All-Wheel Drive (AWD) system to give the operator instant engagement when more traction is needed. To complement the drive system, the BIG BOSS is equipped with aggressive 26-in. (66.04 cm) PXT tires that are Polaris-proven and reliable in all types of terrain. For traversing mountainous areas, the vehicle also features Polaris’ exclusive Engine Braking System (EBS) with Active Descent Control (ADC) that work together to provide six-wheel braking for optimum control and smooth deceleration during descents.

To make the biggest hunts and most-remote jobs easier and more comfortable, the BIG BOSS has features that ensure the vehicle does the brunt of the work. The new, variable-assist Electronic Power Steering (EPS) is the easiest to use in the industry. Designed to deliver all-day comfort and control in every application, it automatically adjusts to the riding conditions for effortless low-speed technical maneuvers, and excellent feel and control at high speeds. The EPS ensures the vehicle is a delight to drive, easily maneuvering tight trails or rugged job sites. For rider comfort, the narrow seat and wide, flat floorboards provide a more natural sitting position and easier operator maneuverability. The vehicle also has the highest visibility of any 6×6, due to the rider position and its steerable three-beam, 150W forward lighting, which ensures a lighted path even when turning, making it a reliable work partner regardless of the time of day.

The Sportsman 6×6 BIG BOSS 570 EPS will be available in Sage Green, retails for $10,999 U.S. and $13,599 CAN..

Read more at: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/company/article/polaris-introduces-new-sportsman-6×6-big-boss-570-eps

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INDIAN MOTORCYCLE AND JACK DANIEL’S® PARTNER ON ICONIC LIMITED EDITION JACK DANIEL’S-BRANDED INDIAN CHIEF VINTAGE

Two legendary American brands join forces in handcrafting collectible masterpiece unveiled at Barrett-Jackson auction for the benefit of U.S. Military personnel and their families

MINNEAPOLIS, MN (January 27, 2016) — Indian Motorcycle®, America’s first motorcycle company, today announced it has joined forces with the Jack Daniel Distillery to create the Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s Indian® Chief® Vintage motorcycle. The partnership brings together two of America’s most iconic brands that share a mutual commitment to independence, originality and American craftsmanship that dates back more than a century. The collaboration commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Jack Daniel Distillery, which was registered in 1866.

The 2016 Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s Indian Chief Vintage will on display January 23-31 at the Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Collector Car Auction. It will also make an appearance at a series of events throughout 2016 including Daytona Bike Week, taking place March 4-13. Ultimately, this first-in-the-series display bike will be auctioned at the Barrett-Jackson Auction in Las Vegas, which takes place October 6-8. All monies raised from the charity auction will be donated to support “Operation Ride Home,” a partnership between the Jack Daniel Distillery and the Armed Services YMCA that provides funding and travel assistance to help junior-enlisted military personnel spend time with their families during the holiday season.

“This one-of-a-kind motorcycle is the perfect pairing of these two classic American brands, and while they look great together, we’ve inscribed this unique collector’s edition masterpiece with our ‘Bottles and Throttles Don’t Mix’ mantra to remind all our friends that drinking and riding are meant to be enjoyed separately,” said Dave Stang, Director of Events & Sponsorships for Jack Daniel’s. “We’d like to thank our friends at Indian Motorcycle for their help on this project and their support for Operation Ride Home.”

The Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s Indian Chief Vintage will be produced in very limited quantities, taking the iconic Indian Chief Vintage platform to a whole new level with an array of genuine Indian Motorcycle accessories and custom accessories, as well as Jack Daniel’s-inspired custom paint and logos, badging, leather saddle and saddlebags. The bike’s fender is also inscribed with the names of the seven Master Distillers who have overseen the Jack Daniel’s distilling process over its 150-year history. Final customization work was designed and completed by Brian Klock and his inspired team at Klock Werks in Mitchell, S.D. Additional details on the production schedule and ordering process will be released during Daytona Bike Week.

“It’s a pleasure to partner again with our friends at Jack Daniel’s on this project as a tribute to originality and American craftsmanship, and to do so for the benefit of our military personnel and their families,” said Steve Menneto, President of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “Jack Daniel’s and Indian Motorcycle proudly support our troops, military families and our veterans and we are honored to join forces again in 2016.”

For more information about Operation Ride Home, or to make a tax-deductible donation, please visit: http:// http://www.jdoperationridehome.com

Jack Daniel’s press information can be found at the Jack Daniel’s press room located at http://www.jdpressroom.com. Indian Motorcycle images are also available at the Indian Motorcycle press site at http://www.IMCPress.com.

A Legend Reborn: Indian Motorcycle Unveils the 2016 Scout Sixty

To say Indian Motorcycle has had a tumultuous history would be a major understatement. The brand was founded in 1901 — arguably making it America’s first motorcycle company — and it enjoyed a significant amount of early success, growth, and technological breakthroughs. After World War II took its toll, however, its spot as America’s number one bike manufacturer was snatched up by Harley Davidson, and production eventually ceased in 1953. The nameplate was passed around by a variety of short-lived owners for years, but was eventually put down for good in 2003. Or so we thought.

scout sixty

Indian Motorcycle came back from the dead in 2006, and its 2011 acquisition by Polaris Industries gave it new life. A reliable parent company with financial stability meant that the brand could invest in new projects and technologies, one of which just dropped at the EICMA International Motorcycle Show in Milan, Italy.

It’s called the Scout Sixty, an entry-level cruiser based on the Indian Scout that debuted in 2014. The bike shares its chassis, suspension, and brakes with the classically styled Scout, but it’s been fitted with a smaller, 61-cubic inch (999cc) V-Twin engine to bring the cost down and improve agility. With a starting price of $8,999 in Thunder Black, Indian hopes the Scout Sixty will introduce the company to a new group of customers.

“The Indian Scout has been a stunningly successful introduction for us, with balance, performance and maneuverability that appeals to a broad swath of riders here in America and around the globe,” said Steve Menneto, President of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “The new Scout Sixty expands that reach even further to include newer riders and a younger demographic who long to experience the legendary quality and craftsmanship of an Indian motorcycle.”

As far as the specs go, the Scout Sixty creates 78 horsepower 64 pound-feet of torque in U.S. configuration, all of which is channeled to the ground via a 6-speed gearbox. Dry weight is 542 pounds from the factory, but as usual, buyers can choose from a variety of add-ons to personalize their ride to their liking. The Scout Sixty is en route to dealerships now.

Read more at: http://sports.yahoo.com/news/legend-reborn-indian-motorcycle-unveils-101536088.html;_ylt=A0LEV7ja1ExWYn0AYQwnnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–

POLARIS INTRODUCES SPORTSMAN AND OUTLAW 110 EFI YOUTH MODELS

Minneapolis, MN (April 7, 2015) – Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII), the leading manufacturer of off-road vehicles (ORVs), today introduced the Sportsman 110 EFI and Outlaw 110 EFI youth models as part of the company’s continuing innovation of its off-road product offerings. The new models are the first youth ATVs to offer EFI and will be available in dealerships in May.

The Sportsman and Outlaw 110 EFI youth models will replace the current Sportsman and Outlaw 90 models and include an upgraded 110cc engine for improved off-road performance and Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) for easier cold starting, reduced maintenance and improved run and idle quality. Both models will be classified as Y-10+ for riders 10 years old and older with adult supervision. The vehicles’ speed is limited to less than 15 mph/24.1 kph as delivered, and the speed control system allows adults to increase the speed to a maximum of up to 29 mph/47 kph. The Sportsman 110 EFI will be available in Sage Green while the Outlaw 110 EFI in Voodoo Blue.

Polaris is the industry leader in youth off-road vehicles and leads the way in promoting youth rider safety. The Sportsman and Outlaw 110 EFI will continue to offer a wide variety of safety features such as an adjustable throttle limiter to enable adults to set a maximum speed control limit, daytime running lights to increase daytime visibility, full floorboards and heat shields. Other vehicle features include an electric start, automatic transmission, 4-stroke engine, and long travel suspension. Similar to all other Polaris youth models purchased from an authorized dealer, the Sportsman and Outlaw 110 EFI also come with a high visibility whip flag and safety video. All Polaris youth vehicles also come with a DOT-approved helmet (two for the RZR 170 EFI) to help teach kids the importance of wearing the proper safety gear.

Along with the Sportsman and Outlaw 110 EFI, Polaris will continue to offer the Outlaw 50, classified as Y-6+, for riders 6 years old and older; the entry-level Phoenix 200, classified as T, for for riders 14 and older; and the RZR 170 EFI side-by-side for riders 10 years old and older.

Polaris Youth model ORVs lead the way with safety features which make them one of the best-selling youth lines available. Adult supervision is required for all riders under 16. Polaris strongly encourages anyone operating an ORV to take appropriate training. In the United States, the ATV Safety Institute’s RiderCourse training is available through the SVIA, at ATVsafety.org or 800-887-2887. The ROV E-Course and hands-on DriversCourse (for SxS vehicles like the RZR 170) are available through ROHVA, at rohva.org or 866-267-2751.

Read more at: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/company/news-item.aspx?articleID=361

POLARIS ANNOUNCES SPECIAL FOX EDITION AND NEW RZRS IN LIMITED EDITION COLORS

As part of RZR’s continuing innovation and commitment to its enthusiasts, Polaris is announcing several new models featuring new paint schemes and graphics, and a new RZR XP 1000 EPS model with the first-ever Internal Bypass Shocks available on a side-by-side.

The new RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition is hands-down, the best performing suspension ever offered on a sport Side by Side, featuring highly-tuned FOX Podium® Internal Bypass Shocks, re-tuned coil-over springs, new front stabilizer bar and softer rear bar. The vehicle offers the next generation of suspension innovation that takes Razor Sharp Performance to a whole new level.

The new FOX Podium® Internal Bypass Shocks found on the RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition generates highly-progressive damping that gives the vehicle a plush ride with all the bottom-out resistance expected from an ultra-performance off-road vehicle. The shocks have large diameter bodies (3 in/7.6 cm rear, 2.5 in/6.4 cm front), reservoirs and increased fluid capacity for dramatic improvements in heat dissipation, fade resistance and durability. The internal bypass technology offers more zones than a conventional shock for better tenability and performance for the smoothest ride available on a side-by-side and better handling over a wider range of terrain at any speed.

To complement the new shock package, Polaris outfitted the RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition with redesigned coil-over springs. The progressive rate upper spring is a lighter-weight spring that absorbs small impacts while the stiffer, main spring maintains ground clearance and absorbs bigger impacts in rough terrain.   <BR><BR>

The RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition also is the first RZR XP to feature a front sway bar and also has a redesigned rear sway bar with 25 percent less stiffness. Combined with the FOX Podium Internal Bypass Shocks, the sway bars dramatically decrease body roll and improve vehicle handling and comfort.

Along with the new suspension package, the RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition features Matte Turbo Silver paint, cut and sew seats, new graphics package, innovative 6-Point harnesses and the Polaris Interactive Digital Display which is an integrated, industry-leading LCD display and gauge with full-featured GPS, mapping capability and compass. The display also features integrated Bluetooth functionality and shows the speedometer, tachometer, dual trip meters, odometer and maintenance warnings along with a digital clock, and operating conditions including fuel level and diagnostics.

The RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition will be available in dealerships starting in February 2015.

Along with the new RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition, Polaris also is announcing several other new models with new paint scheme and graphics which include the following:

2015 RZR® 570 EPS Black Pearl

Additional features on this model include:

Electronic Power Steering
Engine Braking System (EBS)
TURF Mode
Sealed under hood storage
Maxxis Tires with Cast Aluminum Rims
High / Low beam headlights
Black Pearl paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® 900 EPS Trail Blue Fire

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Engine Braking System (EBS)
TURF Mode
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
Cast Aluminum Rims
Blue Fire paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® 900 EPS Trail Gloss Nuclear Sunset

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Engine Braking System (EBS)
TURF Mode
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
Cast Aluminum Rims
Nuclear Sunset paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® S 900 EPS Voodoo Blue

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
High Performance Steering Wheel
Voodoo Blue paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® S 900 EPS Stealth Black

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
High Performance Steering Wheel
Stealth Black paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® XP 1000 EPS Stealth Black

Electronic Power Steering
Stealth Black paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® XP 1000 EPS Orange Madness

Electronic Power Steering
Orange Madness paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® XP 4 1000 EPS White Lightning (Monochrome)

Electronic Power Steering
White Lightning paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

All models will be available in dealerships starting in January.

Read more at: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/company/news-item.aspx?articleID=308

2015 Indian Scout – Road Test Review

A motorcycle is never just a motorcycle, and the all-new 2015 Indian Scout takes that truth to its extreme. The Sturgis Rally started 74 years ago, during the last moments of the original-lineage Indian Scout’s production. This year, after waiting nearly all of those seven decades, the rally was reunited with this sporty old friend. Sounds romantic, doesn’t it? But it’s complicated.

Until last year, the mud and clay and gravel the Indian name has been dragged through for fully half of its history had been caked on thickly. Polaris, Indian’s newest owner, has done an excellent job of hosing the brand clean and giving it the fresh start it deserved. The Chief and its Chiefy siblings did that by being a new old that’s an updated reflection of the last Springfield design, using a flat-head look for its fully modern air-/oil-cooled, pushrod, OHV, 49-degree V-twin engine, with those big fenders and much chrome. But it’s not news that heritage American iron is a hot seller.

Taking a bolder route, the new Scout desires to be the potential future of a past that never happened, looking for an acceptable narrative to span back to the bike’s far-off beginnings. So does this Scout convincingly carry the Indian heritage forward, and is it functionally a motorcycle you’d want to ride?

The Scout is a modern interpretation of how the evolution of the American V-twin might have gone, without following the calculated semi-Luddite lead of the Chief. The Scout gives a modern answer to this historical question, trying to be what it would be if the model had evolved organically without interruption. There are a thousand answers to this proposition, and all of them are colored by romance, desire, and longing. So don’t insist that Indian’s answer is right or wrong; this Scout is a modern cruiser, its chassis a refraction through the lens of history, its engine a nod to modern times, its EFI for the EPA, all topped off with a damn nice old-school seat.

We’re here to tell you the bike feels good, and a primary part of this is the 69ci (1,133cc), liquid-cooled, 60-degree, V-twin engine that uses chain-driven DOHC and four valves per cylinder fed by a single 60mm throttle body. It’s a semi-dry sump design with a 9,000-rpm redline. High-ish 10.7:1 compression makes it hungry for high-test. The Scout produced 86 hp at 7,730 rpm and 64 pound-feet of torque at 3,320 rpm on the CW dyno. The bigger story on the torque curve is that there are more than 60 pound-feet from 2,400 to 7,400 rpm, and it is a gorgeous straight line of smooth delivery. The cylinders and heads have no fake cooling fins but do have structural ribbing and other aluminum-colored accents.

A six-speed transmission and a left-side final-drive belt transmit power to the rear wheel. The Scout is geared to comfortably roll along at 70 mph in sixth gear at 3,750 rpm, yet with that broad torque production it pulls away easily from a stop. Clutch feel is good, and engagement is smooth and easy.

The suspension is pretty conventional at each end: 41mm fork legs up front and dual, spring-preload-adjustable shocks out back. There’s a claimed 4.7 inches of front-wheel travel and 3.0 inches of travel at the rear. Notice the extreme rake of those shocks, to mimic the hardtail lines of the 1920s Scout. With preload in the delivered setting and without a rider in the saddle, the Scout’s rear suspension tops out with zero sag. With my 150 pounds on board, the rear end tops out on rebound when riding over large bumps. Heavier testers on staff did not experience this. A preload wrench is supplied, but there is no provision to store it on the bike.

The Scout has a single 298mm rotor at each end, with a two-piston caliper up front and a single piston out back. Other notables include a super-low 27.0-inch brown-leather-seat height (as measured in the CW shop with rear spring preload set as delivered; claimed height is 26.5 inches). The seat is so low that swinging a leg over it is no different than stepping over a crack in a root-heaved sidewalk. It’s also covered in more weather-resistant leather than that used in 2014.

The Scout has a multipiece aluminum chassis that saves weight through rational design. The front downtubes are a one-piece casting that incorporates the steering head and additionally serve as the radiator shrouds. Out back is a one-piece casting that includes the swingarm plates and tailsection. These front and rear castings bolt to the bottom front and rear of the engine, which is a stressed member without frame elements beneath it. Two side-by-side, multipiece backbones from the steering head to the rear casting tie the structure together above the engine.

Wheelbase is a rangy 61.0 inches, and the Scout is relaxed in rake and trail, having 29 degrees of the first and 4.7 inches of the latter. The wheels at both ends are of the same dimensions—16 x 3.5 inches—but carry different size Kenda tires: a 130/90-16 72H up front and a 150/80-16 71H rear. These fat tires on little wheels disguise the Scout’s smaller-than-normal size; it’s a 7/8-scale cruiser, à la Smokey Yunick.

Indian, of course, targeted the Sportster, and most of the rest of us will make that comparison too. This is valid in the market and in our minds, but the riding experience really is very different. Still: Compared to the last Sportster 1200 Custom we tested, the Scout is about 6 pounds lighter, made 18 more horsepower and 9 less pound-feet of torque, has a sixth gear, and costs $300 more than a 2014 model. Plus, there’s got to be an easy additional 40 hp hiding in this engine. Basically, it’s untenable that Indian could create the overriding competency of this bike yet have the converse incompetence for its modern, efficient powerplant of 1,133cc to not be capable of 140 hp. It’ll be interesting to see what happens to output on this engine in future models or when breathing on it, remapping it, etc.

The Scout is one of the best-balanced shapes of any cruiser-type motorcycle made, successfully carrying forward the lines and proportions of the 1928 Scout to work in the modern world, as the designers intended. The headlight is basically a copy of the one used on pre-war models, and the forward-slanting fuel tank maintains the original Scout’s go-fast look.

We were first given the chance to ride the Scout on the winding roads of South Dakota’s Black Hills then got one back at our Southern California HQ for full instrumented testing and more mileage. The seating position is right on for a 5-foot-10 rider, with a comfortable reach to the bars and foot controls, and Indian offers fitment options for riders at the far ends of adult sizes. The stock solo leather seat is grand, and after a long day on the road there was none of that burning-cheek feeling. (A passenger pad and pegs are available.) The non-adjustable hand levers are well placed, and the mirrors provide a good rear view, though adjustment tended to wander if the stalks weren’t set to allow the mirrors to be in the center of their swivel-ball adjustment range.

The Scout is smooth and swift from a dead stop. The EFI is crisp across the rev range, transitioning from on-off changes without the hesitation or glitch. The throttle has a linear, almost rheostatic relationship to engine output. At low rpm, engine vibration is close to nil. At high revs, particularly 5,000 rpm and up, the engine did produce quite a bit of a buzz. At 70 mph in sixth, the Scout engine is smooth, but a few testers sensed some buzz at 75-plus.

On the quiet end of the rev range, the Scout is tame and can be ridden as a comfortable, easy-to-handle cruiser for beginners, or it can be railed down a twisty highway as a low-slung performance bike, perfectly behaved at both ends of that scale. Third gear works great for bombing corners on a winding road, and 6,500 to 7,500 is the sweet rev range for instant-on power and prime engine braking. This is not air-cooled V-twin instant low-end response like from a 1200 Sportster.

The transmission on the Scout we rode around Sturgis was certain and smooth with short throws and no missed shifts. The 450-mile testbike we got in California was inconsistent on the 1-2 upshift and could be a bit vague on other shifts. We’d like to see more positive shift action front this gearbox.

It’s surprising that a bike so heaped with historical responsibility can also be such a hoot at bombing the twisties. The 16-inch tires work great with the well-damped suspension to make for sure handling and no skittishness in fast corners, with neutral chassis behavior even when trail braking hard down to the apex. Cornering clearance is decent for the class, but the handling character makes you wish for more lean angle.

Steering at low speeds is light and precise, and the low center of gravity rewards the use of both brakes. Although the single front disc has good feel and light effort, a second front disc would be welcome.

For comfortable, sporty cruising, and for carrying the Indian torch, the new Scout succeeds. It’s a modern interpretation of the name, a reflection of heritage, not an imitation of outdated technologies. Fit and finish is excellent, and colors include red and black plus matte finishes in smoked black and smoked silver.

Indian has made a big bet with the Scout and worked hard to make a statement at its Sturgis launch. It hired the American Motor Drome Company’s Wall of Death and Charlie Ransom (who looks as though he just stepped out of Ray Bradbury’s Something Wicked This Way Comes) to take a modded version of this bike to the boards. That was seriously impressive. It’s not common for a manufacturer to associate itself with a daredevil sideshow, yet Indian rolled out its Scout in old-school carnival style: scary, dangerous, fantastic, with no hands. And it was real. If this were the only true beginning of this Scout’s history, it’s a damn great start.

As read on: http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/10/30/2015-indian-scout-road-test-cruiser-motorcycle-review-photos-specifications/

Part Two: A Closer Look at Indian Motorcycles

As part of our ongoing automotive and motorcycle coverage, we’re taking a couple days to take a close up look at Indian Motorcycles and the business of challenging an industry giant like Harley-Davidson. Today, we check in with an industry expert for an objective look at Indian’s operations.

Basem Wasef, motorcycle journalist, author and industry expert explained that Polaris’s resuscitation of the Indian brand has been both “brilliant and painfully obvious.”

“Polaris has applied considerable financial investment toward bringing back a legendary nameplate, creating relatively reliable modern motorcycles that pay homage to bikes which were arguably better in nostalgic retrospect than they were in reality,” Wasef said. “But at its core, Indian is less about the motorcycles themselves, and more about the power of a brand.”

Menneto evidently agrees: “We can’t build to match Harley’s capacity, but we can build a brand that’s popular as an alternative — that’s popular with a dedicated customer base with which we can build a relationship. Rather that match the size and capacity of Harley-Davidson, we’d rather compare with premium brands like BMW or Ducati.”

Wasef stressed that challenging Harley-Davidson’s market share would have been unthinkable if Polaris had created a new brand altogether.

“When it comes to brand perception, established Japanese manufactures like Suzuki, Yamaha, and Honda still can’t touch Harley-Davidson in the areas of authenticity and that inscrutable sense of cool,” Wasef added. “But by adopting a nameplate that’s older than H-D and happens to be associated with larger-than-life personalities like Steve McQueen and Burt Munro, Polaris has taken on a serious challenge and dipped their toe into a potentially lucrative business.”

Indian’s slow build is still in effect. For three years, all Indian Motorcycles built were the Chief and Chieftain models — ranging in price from about $19,000 to $23,000. For the first time since the company made its return to business, it introduced new bikes this year — expanding its line at the top and bottom with the $27,000 Roadmaster and the $10.000 Scout.

The latter is especially important as it reaches out to less affluent buyers with its smaller price tag. If Indian wants to compete with H-D, they’re now trying to get to riders when they’re young and equipped with less disposable income.

Steven D. Menneto, Vice President for Motorcycles at Indian, admitted that Indian is still not building to full capacity as that all-important five year business plan unfolds. The next phase for Indian looks to be expanding to more international markets in Europe and South Africa to diversify that brand loyalty. Only time will tell if this classic American make will stand the test of time in a new business era of high-tech and international competition.

Wasef insisted it will still take significant amounts of time to make a dent against the Harley-Davidson juggernaut.

“But, considering the aggressive product development that has occurred since the new Indian models were revealed one year ago, Indian looks like it will be a serious force to be reckoned with moving forward.”

As read on: http://www.craveonline.com/lifestyle/cars-auto-motorcyles/781713-part-two-closer-look-indian-motorcycles

Part One: A Closer Look at Indian Motorcycles

Recently, a rival of Harley-Davidson – a Japanese motorcycle company that builds multiple cruising and touring motorcycles – held a recent full-line press event at a rural Georgia country club.

On the first morning of the media gathering, that bike maker lined all of its models up in a shiny row, with the company’s name and logo prominently displayed on large banners posted all around the motorcycles.

As a visiting couple strolled by the display on their morning constitutional, one said to the other, “Wow, honey. Look at all the Harleys.”

That’s the problem a competitor of the Milwaukee-based motorcycle giant faces. In the world of two-wheeled iron, Harley-Davidson is synonymous with big cruiser and touring bikes. Even if a rival makes better machines in the same class, they’re always looked on by anyone outside the enthusiast commune ant as a Harley.

Indian Motorcycles, the Minneapolis based manufacturer is taking on that identity challenge while trying to reestablish itself as a prominent part of global automotive culture. Indian is actually the oldest American builder of motorcycles — beating Harley-Davidson to the market by two years in 1901. But, while Harley survived highs and lows through the years, Indian faded from the business world in 1953.

Harley-Davidson used the rock n’ roll era of the 1950s and the counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s to build its brand identity as the chosen ride of rebels. Indian missed all of that, finally returning to the American market in 2011 as a smaller division of Polaris – a builder of everything from snowmobiles to ATVs.

In the past three years, Polaris’ branding plan focused on one primary goal — letting the world know its back in business and an All-American alternative to Harley-Davidson.

According to Steven D. Menneto, Vice President for Motorcycles at Indian, the company’s plan for the first 18 months of its existence was “to let them know Indian is back.”

“We knew we first needed to establish what we’d build and what styling cues we needed to make our motorcycles distinctly Indian,” Menneto said. “We knew our motorcycles wouldn’t be small. That’s not our brand. We’d make 100 horsepower, liquid cooled engines powering big motorcycles.”

Of course, by 2011 everyone except dedicated riders identifies such bikes with that H-D Bar and Shield Logo.

Menneto, a veteran Polaris executive before taking on Indian, realized ownership by Polaris offered structural support and financial stability. But, the company needed to look beyond the need for that kind of capital buttressing.

“We had and continue to operate with a five year plan,” Menneto explained. “Gradual, planed growth is key to that plan. We could’ve had 1,000 dealers coast to coast, and we could be building at full Polaris capacity. But, we knew it was better to build the brand first.”

Check back in tomorrow for our continued up close look at Indian Motorcycles.

As read on: http://www.craveonline.com/lifestyle/cars-auto-motorcyles/781711-part-one-closer-look-indian-motorcycles

POLARIS ENTERS 10-YEAR EXCLUSIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

Minneapolis, MN (March 27, 2014) — Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII), the leading manufacturer of off-road vehicles (ORVs), today announced the company has entered a 10-year, exclusive partnership with the Boy Scouts of America, the largest youth organization in the U.S., to provide all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), side-by-sides (SxS) and safety equipment to select Boy Scout camps across the country.

 

“Polaris is proud to join forces with the Boy Scouts of America to develop a comprehensive off-road vehicle program that introduces youth to our sport with an emphasis on safety, responsible riding and respect for the environment,” said Scott Wine, Polaris Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “We are encouraged by the success of the pilot off-road programs and look forward to expanding the course to a national level.”

 

The partnership promotes youth off-road safety practices, environmental respect and the benefits of outdoor activities. Polaris has donated ORVs and safety gear to the BSA’s Northern Star Council’s Tomahawk Scout Reservation, the second largest Boy Scout camp in the nation, and the Northern Lights Council’s Camp Wilderness. The pilot programs at these camps were very popular, with more than 900 Boy Scouts learning basic riding and maintenance while earning safety patches. This 10-year partnership will improve and extend the reach of these courses.

 

“The off-road vehicle pilot we conducted in conjunction with Polaris and several local council camps proved to be both successful and very popular among the youth,” said Chief Scout Executive Wayne Brock. “As we work to keep our programs relevant to the youth of today and tomorrow, we are grateful for this opportunity to work closely with Polaris.  We are excited that in the coming years, with the help of Polaris, we will be able to teach youth safe and responsible practices for the use of off-road vehicles.”

 

Polaris vehicles available to camp visitors for the program include the easy-to-use Phoenix 200, Sportsman 570 EPS and RZR 170 youth SxS. As part of the donation, Polaris will adjust models as needed and replace older units over time to ensure that Boy Scouts always have the most up-to-date and age-appropriate vehicles available.

 

As read on: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/company/news-item.aspx?articleID=229

2014 Polaris Sportsman Ace 4×4 – First Drive

A perfect entry-level vehicle

The all-new Polaris Sportsman ACE is the perfect combination of an ATV and UTV. It’s similar in size to a 4×4 quad and rides almost exactly like the new Polaris Sportsman 570 4×4, but it’s equipped with a single bucket seat, steering wheel, and a roll cage that provides a safe platform for newbies to the sport. This easy-to-use, nimble machine has the easiest learning curve of any ATV or UTV we’ve ever tested. If you can drive a car, you’ll feel right at home in the ACE.

INNOVATIVE & COMFORTABLE

The Sportsman ACE is covered by a ROPS (Roll Over Protection System) cab frame that’s similar to the roll cages found on the RZR lineup, and offers an ergonomically friendly cockpit that’s both easy to ingress and egress for small or large riders. The secure, high-backed, adjustable bucket seat is paired with an adjustable steering wheel. It’s also equipped with a three-point seat belt and has side bolsters to keep the operator properly positioned in the center of the machine. The steering wheel offers 3.5 inches of tilt adjustment, and the driver’s seat slides back and forth by 4 inches to customize the fit for the rider. There is an integrated dead pedal for your left foot to rest on and an integrated heel pocket for your right foot with an easy reach for both the gas and brake pedals. You’re also kept in via dual side nets that feature a metal rod to easily secure for clipping and positioning the nets to the back of the vehicle while exiting. This net system is sure to be replaced by more stylish aftermarket door designs.

TRAIL-READY WIDTH

A huge selling point for the ACE is its trail-capable and easily-transportable 48-inch width, which means it can take on nearly every OHV trail in the country, since many ATV trails are limited to a width of 50 inches. It will also fit in the back of a full-size pickup truck. A nice feature, since most side-by-sides require the added costs of a trailer. To ensure a low center of gravity, Polaris positioned all the major components, including the driver, centralized between the four wheels for an incredibly responsive ride. Along with this low center of gravity, the Sportsman ACE boasts 10.25 inches of ground clearance and 9.5 inches of rear travel due to its fully independent rear suspension (IRS) outfitted with performance, twin tube shocks featuring adjustable preload. The front of the ACE features a MacPherson strut setup with just over 8 inches of wheel travel.

Veteran ATV riders will feel funny in the ACE, at first, but after only a few miles, you’re hit with an added sense of confidence and security; the same feeling that has helped to make side-by-sides the fastest-growing powersports industry. Beginner to expert riders will appreciate the ACE’s comfortable ride and nimble handling characteristics. The suspension feels stiff, compared to standard Sportsman ATVs, but it soaked up the rough, rocky test loop and was difficult to bottom out. The machine felt stable, even around quick, 90-degree corners and even at top speeds your always feel in control.

32-HP PROSTAR POWERPLANT

The Sportsman ACE 4×4 is equipped with a new Polaris ProStar Electronic Fuel-Injected powerplant. It’s a dual-overhead-cam, single-cylinder, four-stroke design that is similar to the 570 RZR and Sportsman, which Polaris released last year. Its displacement is in the sub-400cc category, and it packs a solid 32 hp with a top speed of 45 mph, perfect for the entry-level to intermediate rider. It didn’t hit hard out of the hole, but its power range is wide and very easy to adjust to. This is the perfect powerplant for the rookie trail enthusiast. The motor provided plenty of excitement, the power doesn’t overwhelm or scare, and it’ll provide an excellent platform for learning.

The transmission is identical to the 570 RZR’s and provides the driver with the option of both high and low range, neutral, reverse, and a park mode that acts as the emergency brake. In high, the 32-hp ProStar pulled the 850-pound ACE up and over every obstacle on our technical, 50-inch-wide test loop. We used Low range for ascending and descending the steeper trails, and we powered through deep ruts, mud holes, and rock gardens without so much as a scent from the CVT.

The Sportsman ACE is equipped with the same On-Demand True All-Wheel Drive (AWD) system found on all Polaris ATVs and UTVs. The system eliminates the guesswork by automatically engaging AWD when you need it and then reverts back to two-wheel drive automatically when the AWD is no longer needed. It would be great to have a locking front differential, but this On-Demand system is used and loved by an outstanding number of enthusiasts.

Braking is solid, thanks to four-wheel hydraulic discs with dual-bore front calipers, and the little ACE rides on Carlisle 489 tires, mounted on stamped steel wheels, that provide great traction on most terrains. We put a good pounding on these meats and didn’t come to close to a flat.

Storage on the Sportsman ACE is exceptional with its integrated 2.8-gallon semi-dry, front storage compartment and a high-capacity Lock & Ride cargo box with rack extenders and rear tie-down rails that also accepts the accessory Lock & Ride cargo box for additional dry storage. The vehicle can carry up to 575 pounds of gear and can tow up to 1,500 pounds. The ACE is also pre-wired for the installation of a winch with up to 3,500 pounds of capacity, and Polaris offers more than 25 accessories for the Sportsman, including doors, winches, cabs, and storage to suit their driver’s needs. The Sportsman ACE is available in White Lightning and will be in dealerships in February.

ATV or UTV?

Like it or not, these UTVs are transitioning from a hit fad to the future of ATVing. Since the release of the original RZR 800 seven years ago, Polaris has been the leading UTV manufacturer of such machines, and for $7,499, the Polaris Sportsman ACE is sure to be a hit for both beginners and experts alike. What’s next for Polaris? You can expect the company to follow up with more single-seat and steering-wheel-equipped models from the entry-level ACE all the way up to a mind-blowing 1,000cc rocket ship. Stay tuned.

1401 polaris sportsman ace 4×4
Spec Chart

2014 Polaris Sportsman ACE 4×4

Price: $7499

Engine type: 32-hp ProStar, 4-stroke, DOHC single cylinder

Fuel system: Electronic fuel injection

Starting system: Electric

Drivetrain

Drive system: On-Demand True AWD/2WD

Transmission: Automatic PVT with P/R/N/L/H; shaft

Suspension (Type/Travel)

Front: MacPherson strut/8.2”

Rear: IRS/9.5”

Tires/Wheels

Front: 25×8-12/489

Rear: 25×10-12/489

Brakes

Front: Dual hydraulic disc with dual-bore front calipers

Rear: Dual hydraulic disc with dual-bore front calipers

Dimensions

Wheelbase: 61.5”

Claimed dry weight: 835 lb.

Ground clearance: 10.25”

Length/width/height: 90/48/68″

Fuel capacity: 5.25 gal.

Load Capacity

Front/rear rack/box capacity: 120/240 lb.

Payload capacity: 575 lb.

Electrical

Lighting: Halogen, 55-watt low/ 60-watt high

Instrumentation: Digital gauge, analog speedometer, odometer, tachometer, tripmeter; gear indicator, fuel gauge, AWD indicator, high-temp/low-batt lights, DC outlet

Read more: http://www.atvrideronline.com/features/1401_2014_polaris_sportsman_ace_4x4_first_drive/index.html#ixzz2uXh07KOT