Archive for the ‘ram 3500’ Tag

Ram Trucks Launched Heavy Duty Night Models

Ram Trucks revealed both of the Heavy Duty models for the first time at the 2017 Chicago Auto Show. Based on the Sport appearance package, the Night adds blacked-out features, including wheels, grille surround and badging, to deliver an eye-catching twist on the performance-enthusiast package.

If you’re looking for a way to stand out from the crowd – these Heavy Duty Night models will do just that.

The new Ram Heavy Duty Night package adds:

Black grille surround with black billet inserts
Bold “RAM” tailgate with blackened-out lettering from Ram Power Wagon®
Black Ram’s head grille badge
Flat black Ram 2500 or 3500 Heavy Duty door badge
Flat black 4×4 tailgate badge (if applicable)
Flat black powertrain door badging

The Night package is available on Ram 2500 and 3500 (single-rear-wheel models only) in Crew Cab configurations, 4×2 or 4×4, and any available powertrain combination (5.7L HEMI® V8, 6.4L HEMI V8 or 6.7L Cummins® I-6).

Ram 2500 and 3500 HD Night models are available in Bright Silver Metallic, Bright White, Brilliant Black Crystal, Delmonico Red Pearl and Granite Crystal Metallic.

Production of the 2017 Ram HD Night models began early February 2017. Ram Heavy Duty Night pricing starts at $45,520 MSRP, plus $1,320 destination.

Read more at: https://blog.ramtrucks.com/features/ram-trucks-launched-heavy-duty-night-models/

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The 2016 Popular Mechanics Automotive Excellence Awards

Best Truck: Ram
2016-Ram-1500-Rebel-pickup-01

– Base price: $26,605
– Towing capacity: 9,000-plus lb.
– EPA mileage: 17 mpg city/25 highway

Give it up for the Ram! Top to bottom, this is the model to beat. Chrysler is a perennial third-place finisher in the domestic-truck sales battles, which means that these new Rams are the product of a striver mentality. Chrysler knows that, unlike with a Ford or a Chevy, you probably won’t buy its truck out of habit or hallowed family tradition. So it wants to give you other reasons, compelling technological reasons, for joining the Mopar crowd.

And there are certainly plenty of those. The Ram is the only pickup with a ZF eight-speed automatic transmission, a device so manifestly excellent that Rolls-Royce and Range Rover put the same one in their cars, too. That transmission can be bolted to a satisfying 305-hp V-6, a beastly Hemi V-8, or a 3.0-liter diesel, the only small diesel you can get in a full-size truck. The Ram EcoDiesel nets 29 mpg highway and can tow more than 9,000 pounds, which makes you wonder why it has, as yet, no direct competition.

The Rams also have the most ambitious suspension. The 1500- and 2500-series trucks come standard with a coil-spring rear end, so when you’ve got nothing in the bed (which is probably most of the time) they still manage a smooth ride with superior control, none of the rear-end hopscotch that leaf springs can give you on a bumpy road.

A coil-spring rear end would be revolutionary enough, but Chrysler also offers the industry’s only available air suspension. Going off-roading? Hit a button and it’s like you installed an instant lift kit. If you’re loading cargo, drop the suspension and you can heave those bags of mulch into the bed without approximating the caber toss at the Scottish Highland Games. The truck even knows to drop the body closer to the pavement at highway speeds to improve fuel economy.

On the heavy-duty side, Ram’s got the most torque (a downright silly 900 lb-ft from the high-output Cummins diesel) and the most powerful gas engine with the 410-hp 6.4-liter Hemi. The trucks with an HD badge also get optional rear air suspension, which means the bed stays level even when you’ve loaded it with two yards of gravel or your pet hippopotamus or a bunch of caber poles.

No, the Ram isn’t perfect—the fancy Laramie Longhorn interiors exhibit the aesthetic sensibility of a Reno whorehouse circa 1895—but in terms of fearless ambition and overall goodness, the striver makes a compelling case. You ought to hear it out.

Read more at: http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/g2573/2016-popular-mechanics-automotive-excellence-awards/

2015 Ram 1500, 2500, and 3500 SAE Tow Ratings

The 2015 Ram pickup trucks now have new tow ratings that were certified under the stricter demanding SAE J2807 regulation. Impressively, not a single model sees its ratings decline under the new certification process — and some even see ratings increase slightly. All versions of the 2015 Ram 1500, 2500 HD, and 3500 HD will henceforth have towing figures that meet the stricter tow ratings.

For light-duty pickup trucks, the 2015 Ram 1500 has SAE J2807 tow ratings as follows. Models with the 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 engine and eight-speed automatic transmission can tow up to 9200 pounds, trucks with the 3.6-liter gasoline V-6 can manage up to 7600 pounds, and Ram 1500 models equipped with the 5.7-liter V-8 engine can tow as much as 10,650 pounds. For the 3.6-liter V-6, that’s an increase of 150 pounds compared to 2014 ratings, while the 5.7-liter V-8 see its maximum rating rise 200 pounds.

The 2015 Ram 2500 and 3500 are also subject to the new SAE J2807 ratings. With a 6.4-liter gasoline V-8, the 2500’s max tow rating is 16,300 pounds, or 17,970 pounds with the 6.7-liter Cummins diesel inline-six. Those figures are unchanged from last year. As for the 2015 Ram 3500, trucks with the 6.4-liter engine can tow as much as 16,420 pounds, while models with the 6.7-liter mill boast maximum tow ratings of 30,000 pounds.

Earlier this year, General Motors, Ford, and Ram all confirmed plans to adopt the SAE J2807 ratings. The new certification process is more rigorous and is designed to test the real-world towing abilities and safety of the trucks. It includes tests for the vehicles’ acceleration, braking, and cooling-system performance, as well as things like understeer and double-lane-change handling tests.

GM already confirmed the 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500’s ratings under the SAE J2807 standards. The pickup truck saw some of its models’ ratings decline by 300-400 pounds, depending on engine and configuration, when switching to the new rules.

Source: Chrysler

Read more at: http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/autostrucks/2015-ram-1500-2500-and-3500-sae-tow-ratings-announced/ar-AA2T4pr

Black is the new black

Some Web sages noticed that the only interior color available for the Ram Rebel and Laramie Limited was black (this has been true for both generations of Laramie Limited).  With the 2015 Ram 1500 Laramie Limited, even the headliner and pillars are black.

We asked Ram lead interior designer whether this was due to customer choice or cost, and he said it was partly a matter of being appropriate to the vehicle.

There’s just something about wearing a black suit, just a nice black suit, that your details pop.  I think that’s the thing that we’ve learned over the years, that it’s okay to have a very calming black, very consistent, and then accent it with colors. That’s what we’ve chosen for like you mentioned the Limited; we’ve chosen it for the Rebel that we’re sitting in. It’s appropriate.

Mr. Nagode also mentioned the dirt resistance (to fingerprints) in truck use, as well as customer choice if presented with different options at a lot. However, he also noted that for other vehicles, different colors were more appropriate, particularly in cars such as Charger, Challenger, and Viper. The Laramie Longhorn, he pointed out, comes in either black with brown seats, or in “a frost color” with a warmer brown.

It’s just sometimes the extremes, we tend to kind of limit the choices. Like our Express and Tradesman really only comes in a black environment. And again, that’s perfect for someone that’s going to get it dirty.  …  At the core of our market, we tend to offer more colors, more variations.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/black-is-the-new-black

Ram Jam: Ram Trucks CEO Talks Hellcat, Compact Trucks, and More

Last August, longtime Chrysler executive (he’s been with the company since 1988) Robert Hegbloom took the position of CEO of Ram Trucks. Now that he’s had time to get comfortable with the reins, we sat down to talk sales numbers, EcoDiesel, mid-size trucks, and more—much more.

Car and Driver: Ram sold 395,567 trucks in 2014, placing it in fourth place in the bestselling-vehicle derby behind the Toyota Camry (396,988), the Chevrolet Silverado (471,918), and the Ford F-series (679,496). Safe to call it a big year?

Robert Hegbloom: We were up 28 percent year over year, and three points overall in the market. Basically, we look at our customers and see that they play in a number of areas: work, outdoor [recreation], motorsports, and even [just using the truck] as a family vehicle. And in those spaces, customers are looking for something unique. But the first thing with a light-duty truck is fuel economy, which is so different from where it was a few years ago. We want to deliver on fuel economy first, and then, depending on what their particular needs are, make sure we have the right package.

Might the product lineup get diluted by the staggering amount of available trims and packages and submodels? Do you see consumers being overwhelmed by the number of choices?

You know, it varies when regionalism comes into play. For instance, when you go down to Texas, the Laramie Longhorn is very popular, and there are some urban areas like Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, and Austin, too, and they like chrome. Now when you go to California, they like the monochromatic look. You go to another part of the country and they have preferences, too. So you’ll have regional differences among the package preferences, and the dealers aren’t going to stock all of them.

We know this is sensitive subject, but now that the F-150 has come out and the numbers have posted, where is Ram on the use of aluminum? Last time we talked, [Ram vehicle line executive] Mike Cairns said “aluminum is for beer cans.”

Well, we are delivering fuel economy using technology, like the EcoDiesel and the Pentastar V-6 mated to the eight-speed transmission. Then you add the enablers we put in place such as active grille shutters and aerodynamics. We still have the best aero in the segment, and we want to stay consistent there while looking for new opportunities in efficiency.

Are the guys who buy diesel Ram trucks concerned with being green, or is it just about torque and fuel efficiency?

Ultimately, it’s about delivering on fuel economy without sacrificing any capability. You get 240 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque and 29 mpg on the highway [with the EcoDiesel]. And to put that in perspective, consider that when we launched the 5.9-liter Cummins [in 1989], it had twice the displacement, yet made less horsepower and less torque. The 3.0-liter diesel delivers all the capability a light-duty buyer demands. Typically, consumers see a label and think they aren’t going to achieve the quoted mileage; what we’re seeing is customers writing [to us] about their EcoDiesel truck and saying they are getting 29 mpg or even better.

Gas prices are currently at the lowest they’ve been in years. Is that slowing the sales of the EcoDiesel?

Back in December, when gas prices were at their lowest, we had the highest-selling month YTD that we’ve had since the introduction of the EcoDiesel. We are at 26 days on lot with the EcoDiesel, even being a full year into the model’s availability and while we are increasing our volume. Typically we see much more fluctuation with gasoline prices than with diesel prices, so it doesn’t affect sales as much.

Is there a cap on the number of EcoDiesels you can produce?

We are trying to add 20 percent to our production. We received enough orders on this thing right out of the gate that took us almost to the model year [to have enough available units for sale]. You expect to get a big lift when you come out with something like that, but to sustain it for a year, that’s really something.

Now the big question: Hellcat Ram?

You know, we did an SRT a number of years ago, and it was something that at the time worked for a little bit. We get a few people who think a Hellcat truck would be fun, we could take it to Woodward Avenue and have some fun, but there’s not really a big appetite for that type of performance vehicle right now. Plus [Dodge chief] Tim Kuniskis wants all the Hellcat motors he can get.

ProMaster City—what’s the early feedback?

We need to get them out there. We started shipping in the end of December, and the people that have driven them have been pleased. The 2.4-liter Tigershark four-cylinder with the nine-speed transmission surprised a lot of people, as did the independent suspension, which we were very focused on, because we wanted the driving characteristics right. All three of those are major changes compared to what is in Europe. We took a great platform and optimized it for our market. I’m pretty excited to get them here.

Is a diesel option for the ProMaster City in the cards?

They have it in Europe, and the first time I ever drove one it was a diesel with the manual. But time will tell. We have the technology, but you start getting into the cost of ownership, which is a major driver in a commercial-oriented package. Acquisition price plays a big role in that, and I’m just not sure the appetite is there for that.

What’s the possibility that a mini/mid-size truck based on the Fiat Strada will make it to the U.S.?

No plans. It’s a nice package, but to meet all the homologation requirements, you would essentially have to start over. We looked at it, it’s a 200,000–300,000 unit a year segment with a number of players in it, so unless you see some major changes there’s just not a big opportunity. [A new generation is due next year. Hmm . . . —Ed.]

As read on: http://blog.caranddriver.com/ram-jam-ram-trucks-ceo-talks-hellcat-compact-trucks-and-more/

Meet the 2015 Ram Laramie Limited

With high sales of luxury trucks, an upgraded top-end Ram pickup is not surprising — unlike its 1968-Plymouth-Barracuda-like grille (actually based on an interesting piece of furniture, according to Ram’s chief exterior designer).

Meet the new 2015 Ram 1500 Laramie Limited and 2016 Ram 2500 and 3500 Laramie Limited.

Pricing has not been announced, but the outgoing models start at $49,320 (Ram 1500), $53,195 (Ram 2500), and $54,440 (Ram 3500). That is for the 5.7 liter Hemi V8, driving the rear wheels, with a crew cab, and a 5’7” box on the 1500 and eight-foot box on the heavy duties. 4×4 is extra; a VM diesel is available on the 1500, a Cummins diesel or 6.4 V8 on the 2500 and 3500. We expect the new models to have the same powertrain options and similar pricing despite interior and exterior upgrades.

The chrome bumpers shown here are standard on some 2500 and 3500 trucks, optional on the full line. We believe the Ram 1500 will have a standard eight speed automatic while the 2500 and 3500 will keep the current six speeds (66RFE on 2500, with optional 68RFE; and 68RFE on 3500, with optional Aisin).

The company has not announced any equipment upgrades, but the vehicles shown have sensors in the front bumper (including one in the side) which may be used for forward parking sensors (forward cross path detection would be an interesting addition).

These are the second recent Ram trucks to break from the crosshair theme which started in the 1930s and have stuck with Dodge and Ram pickups off and on (mostly on) since then.

For many more photos and more information, click here.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/meet-the-2015-ram-laramie-limited

Ram 1500 relying more on diesels

Dodge’s use of Cummins diesels back  in 1989 succeeded beyond expectations, reviving a nearly dead truck line. When the company added a VM diesel to the Ram 1500, sales were, again, much better than expected. Chrysler had predicted a 10% take rate, perhaps up to 15%; but Allpar reported in August that the line was running up to 25% diesels when the engines were available.

Like the Cummins B-series engines, the VM has been both reputable and technologically advanced; and sales have exceeded expectations.

Ram announced today that 20% of its pickups would be diesel-powered by November, double its original estimates. This strains VM’s ability to make enough engines for North American Rams and Jeep Grand Cherokees, though Ram worked with VM Motori to raise production.

When the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel opened for orders earlier this year, Ram had over 8,000 requests in three days. Some had predicted lower sales, because the diesel is a $4,000 option on the value-priced Tradesman Quad Cab, and requires the $500 eight-speed automatic.

Diesel Ram 1500s are rated at 20 mpg city, 28 highway, which beats the fuel economy of every competing pickup — and some midsized and compact trucks, down to imported four-cylinder manuals. The engine  generates 420 lb-ft of torque and 240 hp and is highly responsive at low revolutions. The peak towing capacity is 9,200 pounds.

Helping to optimize performance, given the limited range of diesel engines, is the wide-range “TorqueFlite Eight” eight-speed automatic.

Dodge had been planning a Ram 1500 with a Cummins V6 diesel as far back as the Daimler days, but no other manufacturer chose to sell a full sized diesel pickup in America.  (Chrysler has worked with VM since 1992.)

“Being first to market with a diesel engine for the half-ton segment was shown to be a great decision for the Ram Brand,” said Ram chief  Robert Hegbloom, adding that nearly 60% of sales were conquests from other brands, unusual in pickups.

Other unique features in the Ram 1500 series (not on all trucks) include a fluid temperature management system, various methods of cutting parasitic losses, and active aerodynamics aids.

The Ram 1500 earned Motor Trend’s Truck of the Year in both 2013 and 2014, the first time a vehicle of any type has taken the award back-to-back. The Ram 1500 also won the Truck of Texas in both 2013 and 2014.

The 2015 Ram 1500 is backed with a five-year /100,000-mile transferable powertrain warranty including free towing, if needed, and a three-year / 36,000-mile “bumper-to-bumper” warranty. The 2015 Ram 1500 is built at the Warren Truck Assembly Plant (Warren, Michigan); Regular Cab models are built at the Saltillo Truck Assembly Plant in Saltillo, Mexico.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/09/confirmed-ram-1500-diesel-takes-off

Standard Features of the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon

By now you’ve seen the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon. You know it’s got unmatched off-road capability, and you may have even seen it in action. Whether you’re familiar with the Power Wagon’s capabilities or just starting to check it out, here are a few features you’ll be glad to know come standard.

Electric Winch

That’s right, the winch is standard. So if you’re taking your Power Wagon out for some off-road fun or need to rescue “the other guys” from a stuck situation, you’ll find yourself well equipped in the Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon. The Warn 12,000-pound winch is mounted right behind the front bumper, so you can pull up to the scene and save the day … and prove just how powerful your Ram Truck really is.

Front Disconnecting Stabilizer Bar

If you’re in the market for an off-road vehicle, we know you’ll want to be pushing it to the limits. That’s why the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon also comes standard with the unique Ram Articulink front suspension system. High movement joints and the sway bar disconnecting system give you increased control over your axels, so you anticipate bumps in the road with excitement, not dread.

Electronic Lock Differentials

Why go the four-by-four route if you aren’t going to go 100%? Front and rear electronic-locking differentials come standard on every Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon to give it true four-wheel drive and maximum traction. You’ll be in control every bit of the way.

Of course, this isn’t all the Power Wagon has to offer. You know it comes with a 6.4-liter HEMI® V-8 with best-in-class 410 horsepower and 429 lb.-ft. of torque … all this featuring an unsurpassed powertrain warranty of five years or 100,000 miles. Equip it with a Ram Box, and you’ll be the envy of every other truck on (or off) the road.

Read more at: http://blog.ramtrucks.com/features/standard-features-2014-ram-heavy-duty-power-wagon/

Ram 3500 still best in class for towing

Ram has confirmed that the Ram 3500 pickup still has a 30,000-pound towing capacity when tested under SAE’s J2807 standards.

Ford, which has, until now, avoided the SAE standard, is now saying that its claim of 31,200 pounds for the F-450 pickup also meets the standard, even when the 150 pounds of “customer-deletable” items, like the spare tire, jack and center console, are added back in.

This answers questions about towing capacities but fails to answer the question of who is best in Class 3 towing, because the F-450’s credentials as a direct competitor to the Ram 3500 are dubious, at best.

The primary criterion for being in Class 3 is having a gross vehicle weight (GVWR) — payload plus curb weight — at or below 14,000 pounds. Ford claims that both its top F-350 and its sole F-450 pickup have the same GVWR, 14,000 pounds. The GVWR is set by the manufacturer.

The Ram 3500 is a true Class 3 pickup, meeting the standards in curb weight trim.

The Ford F-450 pickup, unlike every other model in the F-450 range, is built on an F-350 chassis, but uses Class 4 components. Ford originally skirted Class 3 limits by stripping standard equipment from the F-450 and redefining the term “curb weight.” In other words, a customer buying an F-450 with all the stuff it is supposed to include, such as a full tank of gas and 300 pounds of driver/payload, will likely find their truck’s curb weight actually falls into the Class 4 weight range.

So is the F-450 Super Duty a Class 3 truck? If so, why doesn’t Ford call it an F-350 and drop the current model? Perhaps it’s an F-400? A F-350 Super-Duper Duty? An F-350½?

The Ram’s claim is rooted in the fact that the Ford F-350, Chevrolet Silverado 3500 and GMC Sierra 3500 cannot tow as much as the Ram 3500. Therefore, the Ram claim is supported.

The question is, why does Ford simply not say the F-450 has the highest towing capacity of any factory-built pickup? Since no other standard pickup is rated to tow 31,200 pounds, that would be true. It might also help justify the extra $10,000-plus for the F-450 compared to either the Ram 3500 or the Ford F-350.

There’s no doubt that Ram could produce a similar vehicle by adding a Ram 3500 bed to a Ram 5500. Wonder what the the towing capacity of such a truck might be, if Ram stretched their legs? (The top towing capacity of a Ram chassis cab is 29,600 lb.)

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/09/ram-3500-still-best-in-class-for-towing

What to Know Before you Tow!

It’s that time of year again! More trailers are on the road during the summer months than any other time of the year so making sure that your trailer is properly prepared can mean the difference between life and death for the family in the minivan behind you.

For that and so many other reasons, it’s important to take towing seriously. There are some simple rules to remember when hooking up so that your trip doesn’t end up a disaster, many of which apply from the largest car carriers down to the smallest scrap haulers.
It All Starts With Your Vehicle

First, you need a properly equipped vehicle. Just about any car on the road can be fitted with a hitch and it is important to consult the owner’s manual of your particular vehicle to find out how much it is rated to tow. Ideally, you shouldn’t be pulling more than 75 percent of the listed maximum for a safe feeling load. Hitting or exceeding the maximum weight not only puts extra strain on your vehicle, but it also makes driving more dangerous. That is why pickup trucks and SUVs are commonly used for hauling, because their heavy curb weights allow heavier loads to be controlled more easily. Powerful engines and body-on-frame construction also qualify pickups and SUVs over cars, but they aren’t essential for all hauling jobs.

There are also different types of hitch receivers ranging from class I to class V, with each designation representing how much a hitch can tow, how that particular hitch is set up and what type of specific hardware must be used. Class IV hitches are the most common and can be found on most new half-ton pickup trucks like the Chevy Silverado, Ford F-150 and Ram 1500.

SAE says that a Class IV can tow up to 12,000 pounds gross-trailer weight and 1,000 pounds of tongue weight. It must use a two-inch hitch receiver opening, which has to use a five-eighths inch pin to secure the ball mount in place. The ball itself must be a minimum of 1.25-inch diameter.

Starting with the proper hardware for your hitch is essential, and getting the right size hitch ball is a big part of that. Different trailers call for hitch balls ranging from one and seven-eighths of an inch up to 2.5 inches. Making sure the ball is the right size for the receiver will ensure a safe connection between your vehicle and the trailer, but that’s only the beginning.
Even Weight is Essential

Weight distribution is one of the most important factors to consider. As you increase weight on the tongue of the trailer, the rear end of the vehicle will sink, causing the front end to lift. That puts more strain on the rear suspension and reduces contact between the front tires and the road. In turn, that means less stopping power and reduced steering ability. Tongue weight – the actual amount of downward force being put on the rear end of the tow vehicle – should be between 15 and 20 percent of the overall trailer weight, though that can be tough to measure accurately. The easy way to check for proper weight distribution is to eyeball your rig and make sure that both the vehicle and trailer are sitting flat.

There’s more than one way to combat poor weight distribution. Ideally, you want about 60 percent of the weight on the trailer to be on top of or in front of the axle, distributed evenly from side to side. If you are hauling an ATV or a snowmobile, this is easily achieved by simply moving the machine until the weight is centered. With something like a travel trailer or a load of gravel, where you can’t simply shift the weight around, there are still ways to achieve proper weight distribution.

Hitch height is an important part of this. Measure from the ground to the top of the hitch ball on both your vehicle and trailer to make sure your tow vehicle isn’t too tall, or too short for your trailer. If the two numbers are different, the difference can be addressed with a drop hitch. Some drop hitches are actually adjustable, which is an ideal setup if you plan to pull more than one trailer with the same vehicle. These adjustable setups will usually also accommodate a trailer this is taller than your tow vehicle as well, although that isn’t as common.

If your hitch height is perfect but you near the vehicle’s maximum tow rating, odds are the rear end of your vehicle will still be sagging, the solution for which is a weight-distributing hitch. This type of hitch will spread the weight on the tongue out onto the trailer axle and to the front wheels of your tow vehicle, helping to achieve a flat ride.
Slow Down

There are several rules to keep in mind while hooking up your trailer, but one reigns supreme: never rush. Taking the time to double check connections and tie downs can mean the difference between arriving safely and going to the hospital.

With that in mind, the next step to hooking up is backing your vehicle up to the trailer. You always need a spotter to guide you into position with your hitch ball sitting underneath the hitch ball housing. Once lined up, open the handle on the ball housing and drop it onto the ball using the tongue-mounted jack. Close the handle on the housing and your trailer is now hooked up. But you aren’t ready to hit the highway yet.

Always use safety chains to ensure that your trailer will remain attached even if the ball somehow becomes disconnected. The key thing to remember with these chains is to cross them. The left-mounted chain on the trailer goes to the right side hookup and vice-versa. That way, if the tongue of the trailer falls off, the chains will act as a cradle and keep it from dragging on the road.

Once the chains are on and the tongue is hitched, it’s time to connect the lights. Most modern pickups and SUVs are fitted with receivers for both four-pin and seven-pin connectors. Adapters are available to make sure you can hook up the lights if your vehicle isn’t fitted with the right connection.

Smaller trailers generally use the four-pin setup, while larger trailers tend to use seven-pin. The difference is that larger trailers usually have their own brakes.

As a side note, make sure the connector is off the ground and covered to prevent it from rusting when the trailer isn’t in use. If your connection isn’t working, try spritzing it with WD-40. Sometimes that’s enough to solve the issue.
Always Double Check

So now your trailer is properly balanced, the safety chains are on and the lights are connected. That means it’s time for a circle check.

Commercial vehicle operators are required to walk around their entire truck before driving on the highway and it’s a habit that is important for personal vehicle owners as well.

Start by double-checking all of the connections at the hitch. Then walk around the trailer looking for any problems that may arise. Specific things to watch for are tire pressure , anything loose on the trailer or debris lodged in or around the axle. Make sure to check that all of the lights functions are working properly as well. Finally, make sure that whatever it is that you are hauling is secured properly to the trailer.

And that’s it! You’re ready to haul. Whether you’re taking toys out for a weekend adventure or hauling a load of scrap to the dump, towing can be hugely helpful and even fun as long as you remember to take it seriously.

As read on: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2014/06/know-tow.html?utm_campaign=twitter&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitter