Archive for the ‘trailhawk’ Tag

Jeep reveals its most capable and luxurious Grand Cherokees

Jeep has flashed some serious off-road muscle in both Moab and New York this month. While the bright lights and polished floors of the Jacob Javits Center don’t make for quite as dramatic a Jeep reveal backdrop as the red cliffs and towers of Moab, that’s where folks will find the biggest Jeep debuts right now. The new 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk wears a raft of upgrades that make it the “most capable factory-produced Grand Cherokee ever,” while the Jeep Summit debuts as the most luxurious.

Jeep shows the new 2017 Grand Cherokee Summit at the 2016 New York International Auto Show Jeep grows the Grand Cherokee family Jeep grows the Grand Cherokee family in NY Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit debut
Moab’s Easter Jeep Safari isn’t just notable to this story because it shares some of the New York Auto Show’s dates once again this year, but because it was the birthplace of the official Trailhawk trim, with the Grand Cherokee serving as the launch vehicle. The Trailhawk name existed at Jeep for a while, and was used on an open-top, Wrangler-based 2007 concept car, but it really gained steam at the 46th Annual Jeep Safari in 2012. Jeep’s annual slate of Safari concept models that year included the Grand Cherokee Trailhawk Concept.

Quite simple by Jeep Safari concept standards (especially compared to the Mighty FC also revealed that year), the 2012 Trailhawk concept was a look at a Grand Cherokee with elevated off-road readiness. It included Mopar rock rails, 18-in Goodyear off-road tires, and red, mineral gray and black accents throughout.

It wasn’t nearly as radical or lust-worthy as other Jeep Safari concepts then and since, but the modest Trailhawk package was one of the more production-ready designs to come out of the annual Safari gathering. Jeep experimented with a short-lived production Grand Cherokee Trailhawk in model year 2013, then gave the “Trailhawk” a hard launch as the most capable of the four model options on the 2014 Cherokee redux. It followed up with a Renegade Trailhawk.

“Our Cherokee and Renegade Trailhawk models are among our fastest selling and most sought-after models, and we are following that successful formula to provide consumers even more legendary Jeep 4×4 capability for Grand Cherokee,” explains Jeep chief Mike Manley.

The newest Trailhawk follows the original Grand Cherokee Trailhawk concept closely, sliding a set of burlier off-road-ready standard equipment under and around the driver. That equipment includes Jeep’s Quadra-Drive II 4×4 system with rear electronic limited slip differential (ELSD), a tweaked, Trailhawk-spec version of the Grand Cherokee’s Quadra-Lift air suspension, 18-in Goodyear Adventure off-road tires (20-in Adventures available optionally), skid plates and an anti-glare hood decal. Jeep says that the model has up to 10.8 in of ground clearance.

Of course, many folks aren’t happy just knowing they have the most capable Grand Cherokee in the showroom – they want others to know, too. The new Trailhawk has a variety of distinct visual cues, including front and rear Trailhawk red tow hooks, a front fascia lifted from the 75th Anniversary Grand Cherokee, Trailhawk and Trail Rated badges, and gray accents on the mirror housings and roof rack. Mopar rock rails are available optionally.

The black Trailhawk interior includes leather and suede performance seats, red contrast stitching, a Trailhawk-badged steering wheel, and brushed piano black and gun metal-finish accents. The standard 8.4-in Uconnect infotainment system includes off-road-specific readings of things like wheel articulation, suspension height, and Selec-Terrain mode.

The Trailhawk will arrive in showrooms late this summer (Northern Hemisphere) in a variety of colors and with the full slate of Grand Cherokee engine options (minus the SRT 6.4-liter V8). Pricing has not yet been released, but for reference, the 2016 Cherokee Trailhawk is priced US$7,600 more than the Cherokee base Sport 4×2 trim and the Renegade Trailhawk is $8,750 more than the Renegade Sport 4×2 trim.

Rounding out the six-model 2017 Jeep lineup is the all-new Jeep Summit, also introduced in New York. If the Trailhawk is the brutish dirt rat of the Grand Cherokee family, the Summit is the posh urbanite. Jeep calls this one its most luxurious full-size SUV, and premium features like the full-wrap Laguna leather interior, 19-speaker, 825-watt Harman Kardon audio system, acoustic windshield and side glass, lighted door sill, headlamp washers and auto-folding power mirrors make it so.

Like the Trailhawk, the Summit tackles the ground ahead with help from the Quadra-Drive II 4×4 system with ELSD. It also comes standard with Quadra-Lift air suspension, Selec-Speed Control and driver assistance features like adaptive cruise control, blind spot detection, forward collision warning, lane departure warning, and parallel/perpendicular park assist. The exterior includes an updated front fascia, LED fog lamps and new 20-in polished aluminum wheels.

The Summit will roll out during the same late summer timeframe as the Trailhawk.

As read on: http://www.gizmag.com/2017-jeep-grand-cherokee-trailhawk/42488/

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk: More Off-Road Prowess for the Grandest Jeep

Jeep first introduced the Trailhawk name on a Grand Cherokee concept in 2012, whipped up for that year’s Easter Jeep Safari fan event in Moab, Utah. In the years since, Jeep briefly introduced an off-road-oriented Grand Cherokee Trailhawk model for the 2013 model year but quietly removed it from the lineup after the Grand Cherokee’s 2014 facelift, transferring the Trailhawk name to trim levels on the smaller Cherokee and Renegade. Due this summer as a 2017 model, the Grand Cherokee Trailhawk follows the formula laid down by that concept of many years ago and codified by the production Grand Cherokee, Cherokee, and Renegade variants, adding more off-road capability and butchier looks.

The Trailhawk joins the Grand Cherokee family as that SUV’s sixth trim level next to the existing Laredo, Limited, Overland, SRT, and the freshly revised Summit. (It is, we must point out, distinct from the 707-hp, Hellcat-powered Grand Cherokee SRT Trackhawk that arrives next year.) Standard is Jeep’s Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive setup—the hardest-core version available in the Grand Cherokee, which can also be had with rear-wheel drive or Quadra-Trac I, an all-wheel-drive system that lacks low-range gearing. Other standard features include an electronic limited-slip rear differential, Hill Ascent/Descent control, skid plates, and 18-inch Kevlar-reinforced Goodyear Adventure tires. The adjustable air suspension optional on other Grand Cherokees is also included, albeit modified for an extra 0.4 inch of ground clearance in its tallest setting (for a total of 10.8 inches), and Trailhawk-signature red-painted tow hooks poke from the Grand Cherokee’s bumpers. Jeep will offer this Trailhawk with either the Grand Cherokee’s standard 3.6-liter V-6 engine or its optional Hemi V-8, but not with the diesel engine offered on other models.

Jeep further distinguishes the Trailhawk with gray-painted door mirrors and a matching gray roof rack, a matte-black hood decal, and red-hued “Trail-Rated” badging. Buyers can choose from Redline Red, Billet Silver, Bright White, Rhino, Granite Crystal, Velvet Red, and Diamond Black paint. Inside, the seats are covered in black leather and microsuede with red stitching, and the dashboard features piano-black and gunmetal-colored trim. There also is a Trailhawk badge on the steering wheel and a standard 8.4-inch touchscreen with Chrysler’s Uconnect infotainment platform and special displays for the suspension settings, wheel articulation, and more. Optional extras include 20-inch wheels and Mopar rock rails for protecting the Grand Cherokee’s rocker panels from pesky boulder impacts. Pricing for the resurrected Grand Cherokee Trailhawk hasn’t yet been announced, but expect it to live in the middle of the Grand Cherokee lineup.

Read more at: http://blog.caranddriver.com/2017-jeep-grand-cherokee-trailhawk-more-off-road-prowess-for-the-grandest-jeep/

Jeep Renegade Vs. Chevrolet Trax: Compare Cars

The subcompact SUV segment is expected to really take off this year, and two of the highest-volume new entries are likely to be the 2015 Chevrolet Trax and the 2015 Jeep Renegade.

Offered by all-American brands, they’re smaller than their “compact” siblings, the Chevy Equinox and Jeep Cherokee, respectively. But they offer two very different approaches to designing, packaging, and equipping the smallest all-wheel-drive utility vehicles you can buy from each carmaker.

While the 2015 Trax has Chevy design cues at the front end, it’s otherwise almost the generic small SUV. It’s not bad, just bland. The littlest Jeep, on the other hand, uses oversized design flourishes–big headlights, big wheel arches, numerous Jeep logos–to underscore its toughness even in a small package, to the point where it’s almost cartoonish.

Both vehicles are impressive inside, however, with comfortable seats, quiet rides on decent pavement, and a roster of the latest infotainment and electronic safety systems that would have been seen only in luxury cars not so many years ago. Neither of these vehicles is likely to be used off-road all that much, with the possible exception of the Renegade’s toughest Trailhawk model, so they’re tuned for on-road finesse and comfort.

Each comes as a base model with front-wheel drive, and offers all-wheel drive as an option. The Chevy Trax has only a single powertrain: a 1.4-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, making 138 horsepower and paired to a six-speed automatic transmission. The Jeep Renegade, on the other hand, has two powertrains: its own 1.4-liter turbo four, putting out a stronger 160 hp, but mated only to a six-speed manual gearbox, or a 180-hp 2.4-liter four paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission. Both Jeep powertrains offer all-wheel drive as an option.

The Chevy is adequately powered, but not particularly quick; the Jeep is more powerful, but also heavier, and Fiat Chrysler’s engineers seem to have tamed their temperamental nine-speed automatic at last. We found the manual-gearbox Jeep more fun to drive and lighter on its toes, but in reality, most buyers will opt for the automatic.

Fuel economy ratings for the Trax are 29 mpg combined for the front-wheel-drive version, dropping to 27 mpg if you add all-wheel drive. Final ratings for the Jeep aren’t out yet.

The two small utes differ quite a lot in their packaging, however. Rather to our surprise, the Chevy Trax can hold four adult-sized people in reasonable comfort. Five is a very tight squeeze, and rear-seat riders will have to stagger their shoulders, but it’s definitely possible. The Jeep Renegade, on the other hand, has a smaller rear compartment that’s tight on knee room, and fitting four adults into its cabin will require negotiations to get the folks up front to sacrifice some of their own legroom.

The Jeep’s interior conveys ruggedness in its materials, shapes, and surfaces, while the Chevy is straightforward, practical, and adopts a number of clever convenience features from the Sonic subcompact on which it’s based. The Trax in particular has lots of trays, bins, cupholders, and the like to hold your gear. Both have front seats that can fold flat to carry long items diagonally.

Chevrolet has achieved top safety ratings for the Trax from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), which designated it a Top Safety Pick. It also earned five out of five stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), which gave it five stars in every category except rollover safety, where it received four stars. The Jeep Renegade hasn’t yet been rated by either group, though we expect it to get acceptable ratings at the very least.

In the end, both the 2015 Chevy Trax and the 2015 Jeep Renegade ended up with identical scores in our ranking system. The Jeep wins on styling and performance, the Chevy on features and safety. If rear-seat room is more important than styling panache, the Chevy is your choice; if toughness and design flair, plus optional off-roading ability (in the form of the Trailhawk model) are high on your list, the Jeep is it.

Either one is a modern and capable small utility that competes handily with any competitors of similar size. Both face a formidable challenge from the 2016 Honda HR-V, however.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1096943_jeep-renegade-vs-chevrolet-trax-compare-cars?fbfanpage

2015 Jeep Renegade First Drive & Review

Jeep had paraded the ’15 Renegade and Renegade Trailhawk in front of journalists and the general public for over a year. We snickered at it, leered at it, touched it, and even sat in it during that time. The new Jeep really began to pique our interest, though. Was it a real Jeep, or was it simply a rebodied all-wheel-drive Fiat 500L? To find out, we jumped at the chance to get behind the wheel and test drive the Jeep Renegade Latitude 4×4, Limited 4×4, and the top-tier Trailhawk 4×4. Sport and 4×2 models are also available. Our review took us over the streets and freeways, as well as in the hills and mountains, near San Jose, California. First and foremost, if you’re a Jeep enthusiast who’s into lift kits, oversized tires, and boulders larger than bowling balls, stop reading. Traditional off-road Jeep fanboys and fangirls scoff at any 4×4 that doesn’t have a ladder frame or at least solid axles front and rear and for good reason. These heavy-duty components are some of the last bits leftover from when the first Jeep rolled off of the assembly line over 70 years ago. But, a company like Jeep can’t survive in today’s competitive automotive marketplace by building only Wranglers. New segments are needed to broaden the brand’s appeal and bring in new customers looking for on- and off-road capability and efficiency to the tune of more than 30 mpg. And that is exactly what the ’15 Jeep Renegade is designed to deliver.

With an open mind, it’s hard to not like the sporty and fun-looking Renegade when inspecting the exterior. The round headlights, seven-slot grill, trapezoidal wheel openings, and overall utilitarian feel of the Renegade set it apart from the other seemingly more sophisticated, and frankly boring, vehicle lineup in the compact-SUV segment. By comparison, the Jeep Renegade is that unconventionally amusing uncle, the one that let you light fireworks in the house and shoot beer bottles in the backyard. We appreciate that the Renegade puts a smile on our face, even when it’s simply parked.

The interior of the Limited and Trailhawk models we drove were quite plush and felt similar to what you would see in a top-tier Cherokee or Grand Cherokee. We appreciated the use of soft-touch materials in places where other manufacturers might use less-impressive hard plastic. The Renegade is available absolutely stuffed with technology. Some of our favorite features include the built-in on-demand Wi-Fi hotspot capability and an available mobile phone app, which enables owners to start their Jeep and lock or unlock doors from their cell phones. The instrumentation is easy to read and most controls are intuitive in their operation. We absolutely love the split HVAC system and the real numbers on the adjustment knob, instead of an ambiguous blue and red line designed specifically to mock us while we incessantly fumble for a comfortable temperature.

We tested both the 1.4L MultiAir Turbo and the 2.4L Tigershark MultiAir2 engines on-road. The six-speed manual used behind the 1.4L is a sporty, quick-shifting transmission. It takes no time at all to learn where the forward gears are and manipulate the clutch effectively. Shifting into Reverse requires that you lift up on the shift ring, similar to the shifter you might find in a sandrail or VW Baja Bug but much easier to engage. The 160hp 1.4L punches out 184 lb-ft of torque. You can keep busy shifting in the mountain twists or you can simply rev the engine to the moon by selecting the proper gear. Both options are fun. The naturally aspirated 2.4L produces 180hp and 175 lb-ft of torque. This engine is coupled to the nine-speed automatic, which can be just as fun to drive as the six-speed when toggled through the gears manually. Overall, the Jeep Renegade handles crisply and is extremely confidence-inspiring on-road.

Of course it wouldn’t be a Jeep if it didn’t go off-road. Nothing else currently in the vehicle segment even compares to the off-road capability of the Jeep Renegade Trailhawk. It has some off-road features, such as the large accessible bright red tow hooks, 20:1 crawl ratio, and Selec-Terrain traction system that we wish were on other vehicles considered to be more trail worthy by many 4×4 enthusiasts. Interestingly enough, the Renegade Trailhawk even has better approach, departure, and breakover angles than a Cherokee Trailhawk. An extracurricular off-road adventure took us to the sand dunes and rocky mountain trails in southern California. We were pleasantly surprised at how far up the trail we could take the Renegade Trailhawk, almost to the point of feeling guilty, while wondering “Should we be here in this?” It drives like a maneuverable side-by-side UTV. Rather than being forced to climb over rocks, ledges, and other trail obstacles, you can simply steer around them with ease if you choose.

The ’15 Jeep Renegade is not a Wrangler, and it shouldn’t be. Most new Jeeps never even go off-road. Think of it like this: without the success of the Renegade, the current Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee, the Wrangler would not exist, and neither would the Jeep brand. As a Jeep enthusiast you don’t have to buy these new Jeeps or even like them, but you should thank someone that does. Ultimately, all Jeeps, including the ’15 Renegade, are offered in a model that is still best in class for off-road capability, and that’s really what the Jeep brand is all about, right?

Read more at: http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/research/2015-jeep-renegade-first-drive-and-review/ar-AAaXXEg

2015 Jeep changes: power boost, more

The 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT will get a minor power boost to match the Challenger and Charger — going up to 475 hp. So far, there is no Hellcat, and while it was reportedly considered, Allpar finds it unlikely that the 707 horsepower beast will make it into the luxoJeep.

All prices in this article including a $995 destination charge. Hawaii residents have a $1,045 destination charge.

In addition to the power boost, a new Red Vapor Special will be available to Grand Cherokee SRT buyers (and, despite some odd speculation by other publications, yes, the name will remain Grand Cherokee SRT.)  Grand Cherokee Summit buyers will also find un-named “enhancements” to the top of the line model, which will start at $49,590 without all wheel drive. (The base Laredo runs $30,590, in rear wheel drive form. The SRT makes even Summit look inexpensive, with a price tag of $65,390.)

Wrangler has stereo improvements and a new, optional “black steel” 31 inch wheel setup.  It starts at $23,590 for Sport (two-door), and runs up to $36,190 for Rubicon Unlimited. Generally, moving from the two-door to the extended-wheelbase four-door Unlimited adds $4,000 to the price.

All Wranglers now have a 4×4 setup, and mail carriers (and presumably anyone else who likes the steering wheel on the “wrong” side) can opt for a right-hand-drive Sport Unlimited at $36,190. That’s around $5,000 more than the usual Sport Unlimited.

Cherokee adds a backup camera and automatic headlights to Latitude and Trailhawk models. It will start at $23,990 for the Sport FWD and run up to $31,190 for the Limited AWD; AWD adds $2,000 to the price. Trailhawk is the only model with skid plates and is the base model for those who really intend to go off-road, beyond gravel and dirt roads.

Compass and Patriot Latitude gain a navigation system option, but remain otherwise unchanged as they soldier on. The little Jeeps, made in the same plant as the Dodge Dart, start at $17,490 for the Patriot Sport FWD and end at $28,990 for the Compass Limited AWD. Generally, AWD adds $2,000 to the price, and Patriot is  $1,500 to $2,300 cheaper than equivalent-level Compass, though it has more space and looks “more like a Jeep.”

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/08/2015-jeep-changes-power-boost-more

Outfitting for Off-Roading: A Guide to Trail Etiquette

If you’re new to the world of off-roading in your Jeep brand vehicle, learning the ways of the trail can be a little intimidating. That’s what we’re here for. In the last installment of Outfitting for Off-roading, we filled you in on some common off-roading terms to add into your vocab. Today we’ll highlight several of the unwritten rules of trail etiquette and take you through what to expect when you’re first getting out there.

Just like regular city driving, the world of trail blazing has its own unique set of rules. Below are some common situations you may find yourself in while taking on any trail.

Do: Keep other vehicles in sight. Especially if the trail you’re on is not particularly clear, it’s easy to lose track of other vehicles in your party. Make sure you can always see the vehicle behind you in your rear view mirror to prevent anyone from getting off track.

Don’t: Tailgate. Trust us, tailgating on the trail is even more irritating than on the highway. And it’s dangerous. Allow the vehicle ahead of you to completely pass over the obstacle before you make an attempt.

Do: Allow vehicles going up an incline to have the right of way. If a vehicle going up an incline loses momentum, it can cause a potential loss of traction. If you come across this situation on the trail, the vehicle going down should pull over as safely and quickly as possible.

Don’t: Speed. Trail riding is not a quick activity. Take your time, be aware of all obstacles and enjoy the environment around you.

Do: Be prepared. When it comes to spending time on the trails, we couldn’t agree more that it’s better to be safe than sorry. Make sure you bring the essentials, including tow straps, a first-aid kit, a CB radio and a spare tire among other things.

Keep an eye out for the next article when we go over the basics of tackling sand in your Jeep brand vehicle.

Read more at: http://blog.jeep.com/adventures/outfitting-roading-trail-etiquette/

Outfitting for Off-roading: Introduction

If you’ve never been off-roading in your Jeep brand vehicle, it’s time to pull out your calendar and mark a date. There’s no better time than summer to take an adventure outside of your everyday life and experience what it truly means to have a Trail Rated vehicle.

The Jeep Blog is starting a series here at the Jeep Blog called “Outfitting for Off-roading” in order to help you out with some of the ins and outs of prepping to hit the trails. So check back as we post some of there tips and tricks on our blog! Learn more about adventuring through various terrains and read suggestions on how to customize your Jeep brand vehicle with Mopar accessories in order to take on every trail headfirst.

To get you started, below is a list of off-roading terms you’re going to need to know as you’re preparing to hit the trails.

Articulation – Articulation happens when one or more wheels are elevated and others are planted on the ground. This helps your Jeep brand vehicle drive over rocks and other objects you may encounter on the trail while maintaining stability.

Crawl Ratio – Your Jeep brand vehicle’s crawl ratio is what allows it to climb steep inclines or take on taller rocks. It allows your vehicle to slowly maneuver up and over your obstacle without you having to use the accelerator.

Ground Clearance – Ground clearance refers to the height of objects your vehicle can take on without causing any damage to the underside of your vehicle.

Low-range – The low-range feature on your Jeep brand vehicle helps you to add additional traction when needed.

Traction – Traction is what helps keep your Jeep brand vehicle from sliding on slippery or wet surfaces. It helps you maintain control of the vehicle, particularly when driving in rain, snow and mud.

As read on: https://blog.jeep.com/adventures/outfitting-off-roading-intro/