Archive for the ‘dodge charger’ Tag

50 Years of Charger: Part 5 of 5 | The 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968, 1969, 1970 and 2006 Dodge Charger. Today, in our final blog post in the series, we’re focusing on the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat: Interior, Exterior and Engine

Inside and outside, the 2016 Dodge SRT® Hellcat is a sight to behold — if you can catch a glimpse of it racing by, that is. From the sporty, refined interior to the supercharged 6.2L HEMI® SRT Hellcat V8 engine, every detail of this road warrior is designed for comfort and performance.

Even at a standstill, the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat looks like it’s ready to sprint from the line. The SRT Hellcat front fender badging puts the competition on notice, and the aluminum hood featuring air extractors astride a center NACA duct is both functional for cooling and bold in style.

In addition, the 20×9.5-inch forged aluminum slingshot wheels in standard Matte Black or available Brass Monkey finish exude speed. For muscle car enthusiasts who truly want to stand apart from the crowd, optional SRT Hellcat dual racing stripes add an aggressive appearance to an already intimidating vehicle.

If you thought the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat looked like a beast on wheels, just wait until you feel the power under the hood. The supercharged 6.2L HEMI V8 pushes muscle to its very limit, exerting a monstrous 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque. All of that power is routed to the rear wheels via a TorqueFlite® eight-speed automatic transmission that’s been enhanced with additional pinion gears and five additional clutch pack discs.

To harness all that power, the Charger SRT Hellcat features performance-tuned steering to give the driver good vehicle response and increased ease of maneuverability in tight spaces. Further, the three-mode Bilstein® adaptive dampening suspension works to put the driver in full control no matter the conditions. The Brembo® ultra high-performance brake system boasts monster-sized 15.4-inch two-piece rotors that work with six-piston calipers on the front, and 13.8-inch rear discs for incredible stopping power.

For those who believe driving can be an art form, the interior of the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat has been designed for comfort and style, with dark satin accents, and engineered for road-ready confidence and control. The SRT flat-bottom steering wheel with gunmetal accents is designed to fit firmly in the palms of your hands, and the 7-inch customizable driver information digital cluster display delivers real-time information. To flex some serious muscle on the interior, the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat features a 200-mph speedometer.

The 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat: Keyfobs and Safety & Security Features

Speaking of high speeds and harnessing power, the 2016 Dodge SRT® Hellcat comes with two key fobs — a black key fob that restricts power to 500 horsepower and a red key fob that unlocks the full 707 horsepower of the supercharged 6.2L HEMI® SRT Hellcat V8 engine.

Safety and security features include the ParkView® rear back up camera*, ParkSense® rear park assist system, and suite of standard airbags†, including advanced multistage driver and front-passenger airbags, supplemental full-length side-curtain airbags, front seat-mounted side pelvic thorax airbags and a driver-side knee blocker airbag.

Power, performance, style — after 50 years of the Charger, the 2016 Dodge Charger SRT® Hellcat still represents the principles of the original and continues to define the muscle sedan. We can’t wait to see what the next 50 years of Charger brings.

Learn more about the history of the Dodge Charger at the Redline Dodge Blog, and check out the current lineup at dodge.com.

Read more at: https://blog.dodge.com/heritage/50-years-dodge-charger-2016/

50 Years of Charger: Part 4 of 5 | The 2006 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968, 1969 and 1970 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 2006 Charger, with one final blog post to follow on the 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 2006 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

Following a nearly two-decade hiatus, Dodge Charger roared back onto American roadways in 2006. This sixth-generation model took cues from its forbearers of the muscle car era, and put a modern spin on the iconic nameplate. The Dodge Charger, in its first year back on the blacktop, was available in SE, SXT, R/T, R/T with Road/Track Performance Group, Daytona R/T and SRT8 versions.

The true excitement of the 2006 Dodge Charger is that the muscle car giant returned with a focus on power and performance. The SXT model came equipped with a 3.5L V6 engine, 5-speed automatic transmission with AutoStick® manual shifting feature, all-speed traction control, as well as ABS and electronic stability control.

The 2006 Charger also saw the introduction of all-wheel drive. Additional power was available with the Charger R/T, which packed the punch of a 340-horsepower 5.7L HEMI® V8 mated to a 5-speed automatic transmission. And at the top of the line, the 2006 Charger SRT8 flew off the line with a 425-horsepower 6.1L HEMI® V8 engine.

For its part, the 2006 Dodge Charger Daytona R/T was equipped with a high-output version of 5.7L HEMI V8 engine that boasted 350 horsepower, a retro HEMI decal on the hood and Daytona decals on the rear fenders. The Daytona R/T also included a special front fascia with a chin spoiler and a black rear spoiler.

The exterior appearance of the 2006 Dodge Charger paid homage to the past with reminiscent stamped hood and side panels, and brought its own unique style as a four-door sedan. The SRT8 version featured exterior upgrades such as a special grille, rear spoiler, front fascia and engine cover, larger exhaust tips, and unique colors and exterior trim.

The modern interior of the 2006 Dodge Charger was designed for comfort and loaded with technology. Features included air conditioning, CD player, tilt and telescoping steering column, remote keyless entry and power locks, mirrors and windows. The SRT8 took the interior and technology to yet another level, with standard and optional features including heated front seats with perforated suede inserts, automatic climate control, a performance steering gear, power-adjustable pedals, GPS navigation system, 322-watt audio system, sunroof, rear-seat DVD entertainment system and body-color interior trim.

From highways to racetracks (in 2006, the Dodge Charger silhouette design returned to stock car racing) the 2006 Dodge Charger claimed its place at the top of the muscle car scene. Since then, for the past decade, there’s been no looking back.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-2006/

50 Years of Charger: Part 3 of 5 | The 1970 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ‘66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968 and 1969 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 1970 Charger, with blog posts to follow on the 2006 Charger and 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 1970 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

The 1970 Dodge Charger stands apart from the other model years in large part due to its distinct design elements. The grille is completely encircled with wraparound chrome, and the headlamps were hidden from view, in conjunction with the removal of the center divider from the ’69 model. The 1970 R/T model remains easy to identify thanks to its rear-facing scoops mounted on the doors. New colors were also available in 1970, including Top Banana, Panther Pink, Sublime, Burnt Orange, Go Mango and Plum Crazy.

On the interior, several notable changes and updates helped make the 1970 Charger one stunning muscle car to behold. High-back bucket seats were added in leather or vinyl and the ignition switch was moved to the steering column. In the 1970 Charger SE edition, interior features included a woodgrain steering wheel and instrument panel, new pistol grip shifter, pedal trim, turn signal indicators in the hood and, a first for the Charger, a bench seat. The 1970 Charger R/T also stood apart with 14-inch wheels with raised white letter or white-sidewall tires, and a red bumblebee or longitudinal stripe on the rear.

The 1970 Dodge Charger R/T roared down the road with a standard 440 Magnum V8 with a four-barrel carburetor and dual exhaust, and included an R/T suspension package and heavy-duty brakes. Other available options for under the hood were the 390-horsepower 440 Six Pack engine (a first for Charger) and the earth-shaking 425-horsepower 426 HEMI® engine. Neither of these behemoths came with an air conditioning option, as the focus was on power and power alone. The standard 1970 Charger also included a Slant Six engine as an option.

The 1970 Dodge Charger: Racing and Reception

The 1970 model continued to build on Charger’s prowess on the racetrack. Ten stock car racing victories earned the No. 71 Charger Daytona the championship title that year, and helped bolster nationwide notoriety for the already famed Charger.

The 1970 Dodge Charger, particularly the SE model, is widely considered the most luxurious of that year’s Scat Pack, and it’s not hard to see why — with wood accents, shifter and bench seat. Production in 1970 was just under 50,000 total vehicles.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-1970/

50 Years of Charger: Part 2 of 5 | The 1969 Dodge Charger

For the past 50 years, since the first Dodge Charger took to the streets in 1966, Americans have enjoyed an obsession with power, performance and style. The ’66 Dodge Charger was a flat-out menace on the asphalt, and a game-changer in a hyper-competitive segment and era. With the foundation firmly in place, Dodge Charger continued to grow in size and stature, year after year, always striving for cutting-edge design, awe-inspiring interiors, and performance and capability that broke boundaries with each new iteration of the iconic vehicle.

In this five-part series, the Redline Dodge Blog is looking back at five landmark models in the Dodge Charger’s 50-year history. We started with the 1968 Dodge Charger, and today we’re focusing on the 1969 Charger, with blog posts to follow on the 1970 Charger, 2006 Charger and 2016 Charger SRT® Hellcat.

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 1969 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engine

The 1969 Dodge Charger was distinct in appearance from the 1968 model, most notably because of the new center divider on the front grille, and on the back, longitudinal taillights that replaced the circular design from the previous year. In addition, a new Special Edition (SE) trim line offered chrome rocker moldings and an available sunroof, as well as leather front seat inserts and woodgrain interior details on the steering wheel and dash. On the R/T, the bumblebee stripes were still available as one wide stripe and two smaller stripes.

Under the hood, a 290-horsepower 2-barrel 383 engine and a 330-horsepower 4-barrel 383 engine were available, as well as a 335-horsepower 383 Magnum painted Chrysler high-performance orange in the Super Bee model. In addition, the Six Pack, introduced in 1969, took the 440 Magnum and added a high-rise manifold capable of moving over 1,200 cubic feet of air per minute to accommodate three Holley two-barrel carburetors (thus the number six). The Six Pack produced a roaring sound and was rated at 390 horsepower at 4,700 rpm and 490 lb.-ft. of torque at 3,200 rpm. Additional Six Pack performance features included HEMI® engine valve springs and a recalibrated ignition distributor with dual breaker points.

The Six Pack performance was close to that of the 426 HEMI engine, and at approximately half the cost. To introduce the new high-powered engine, a special 1969 Dodge Super Bee model was developed with a flat-black fiberglass hood and matching black wheels sans hubcaps.

Fame on the Racetrack

The 1969 Charger was a huge success in the showroom and on the roadway, and also made a splash in American motorsports with the introduction of the original Dodge Charger Daytona, known as the “Winged Warrior.” The speedster broke tradition with its unique front end, engineered to help reduce drag, and bested the competition with speed and stability that was unmatched in stock car racing.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-1969/

50 Years of Charger: Part 1 of 5 | The 1968 Dodge Charger

Strap on your safety belts and prepare to be pressed back into your seat.

The 1968 Dodge Charger: Interior, Exterior and Engines

The 1968 Dodge Charger built on the reputation and successes of the 1966 model, maintaining the soul and inspiration of the vehicle while introducing new design and performance upgrades. Perhaps most notably, the 1968 Dodge Charger was the first to feature the eye-catching Coke Bottle styling, with a curvier front fender and rear quarter panel.

Designer Richard Sias was the mastermind behind the 1968 Charger’s groundbreaking Coke Bottle styling, and Harvey J. Winn was responsible for the front- and rear-end sheet metal. The 1968 Charger replaced the electric motor rotating headlights with a vacuum-operated cover, while staying true to form and retaining the full-width hidden-headlamp grille. Dual circular taillamps replaced the full-width versions, and dual scallops were added to the doors and hood.

Not to be outdone by the Coke Bottle exterior, the interior of the 1968 Charger saw its own upgrades and changes. For starters, the center armrest was removed, along with the rear bucket seats, which were replaced with fixed rear seats. The tachometer was no longer a standard feature, and conventional gauges were added, as well as a vinyl mat in the trunk.

Of course, power is the thing, and the 1968 Dodge Charger had that in spades, featuring a standard 318-cubic-inch (5.2-liter) 2-bbl V8 engine, and later that year, a 225-cubic-inch (3.7-liter) slant-six engine. For those who opted for the high-performance package, the 1968 Dodge Charger R/T boasted a 375-horsepower 440 Magnum or the optional 425-horsepower 426 HEMI engine.

1968 also marked the introduction of the “Scat Pack” and its cartoon ad campaign. The Charger R/T came to be recognized for its bumblebee stripes, not to mention its powerful engine. Even Hollywood took notice; the 1968 Dodge Charger R/T 440 Magnum was featured in one of the big screen’s most iconic car chase scenes.

With plenty of power under the hood and an updated design, the 1968 Dodge Charger found its way into movies, auto shows and driveways all across America. The gauntlet was laid, and the most formidable competition would prove to be the following year’s model. Stay tuned for an upcoming blog post on the 1969 Dodge Charger.

Read more at: http://blog.dodge.com/heritage/dodge-vehicle-history/50-years-dodge-charger-1968/

How big will the next Dodge Charger be?

Back in 1960, Chrysler Corporation converted almost its entire product line from body-on-frame to unibody (still using subframes). The revolutionary change could have frightened customers off, as the Airflow did, despite extensive testing.

The company’s leaders thought they could prevent customer resistance by making the cars look fairly similar to the 1959s, a successful strategy. They were lighter and handled better, and that’s all most customers noticed. Chrysler could have made major changes to the styling to call attention to the change, but chose not to.

That made a comment by reliable source oh2o especially interesting: he wrote that the next-generation Charger would be about the size it is today. Most sources have claimed that the Charger would be shrinking to differentiate it more from the 300.

This goes along with yet-unconfirmed rumors that Chrysler might make a large front wheel drive car — a niche flagship which, thanks to shared engineering and a shared plant with the Pacifica, would not need to sell in large numbers to make a profit. The Chrysler could be even larger inside, perhaps sacrificing the V8 for a six, turbocharged or not.

The Charger would stay a muscle car, keeping its size and successful market niche, but with higher gas mileage, better acceleration with its standard engines, and better handling.

As for running against Mustangs and Camaros, there’s no reason for the Charger to do that anyway — now that we have the Dodge Challenger. Indeed, when the original Dodge Charger was made, it was not aimed at the Mustang or Camaro; that was the job of the Plymouth Barracuda (joined in 1970 by the Dodge Challenger and Plymouth Duster).

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/2016/05/how-big-will-the-next-dodge-charger-be-31783

The race is on: Cherokee vs Wrangler

The U.S. sales race is on between the Jeep Cherokee and the former front-running Jeep Wrangler. While the Wrangler epitomizes much of what Jeep used to be — its go-anywhere capability, nearly-all-American design and engineering, and the style-and-form ties to the original Army jeeps — the Cherokee is more practical for most people, more technologically advanced, and newer.

So far, the people have chosen the Cherokee, helped by constraints on the Wrangler’s production. Those constraints will not ease for at least a year, as the Cherokee is moved to a new plant (likely Sterling Heights or Belvidere) and the Wrangler moves into its spot.

The Wrangler has not had a full redesign for some years, and is missing some of the creature comforts of the Cherokee — some of which it can’t have anyway, since its removable roof and off-road chops reduce its comfort-and-convenience options. It is making do with a five-speed automatic, shared now only with the police edition of the Dodge Charger, while the Cherokee has a nine-speed which we’ve been assured will be completely sorted out for the 2016 model year.

So far, the Cherokee’s sales have been 178,785 from January 1 to October 31, 2015, well over the Wrangler’s 173,264. However, there’s time for the Wrangler to catch up as winter weather hits, though now it seems unlikely.

Last year, the Wrangler, at this time, was also second fiddle — to the Jeep Grand Cherokee, losing the race for #1 by around 3,400 sales. Cherokee sales are up 24% this year, Wrangler sales are up 17%, and Grand Cherokee is up just 4%. (Patriot is up by 29% but hasn’t broken 100,000 yet.) Part of the problem there, too, is capacity. Adding the Grand Cherokee to its factory-mate the Dodge Durango brings sales of 208,681. Cherokee and Wrangler each have their own factories.

The other Jeep race is between the new Jeep Renegade and the Jeep Compass. The Compass’ sales are up just 1%, year to date, at 52,987, while Renegade is brand new and has already cleared 44,626 sales. If Compass’ sales drop and Renegade supplies increase, the Italian-made newcomer could well beat the decade-old, heavily refreshed mini-Jeep.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/11/the-race-is-on-cherokee-vs-wrangler-30641

Jeep Trackhawk: 600 hp?

The Dodge Challenger and Charger both have Hellcat engine options, bringing 707 horsepower to the cars. The Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk has long been rumored, and sources say it will indeed have the same engine, but without the same tuning.

There could be several reasons why it would be detuned somewhat:

Cooling is a major issue with this amount of power, and the Hellcats have goals of high consistency at full power. Competing cars from Chevrolet and Shelby have been slammed for throttling back on the power as they quickly heat up at the track.

The Jeep, unlike the others, is rumored to be all wheel drive, which could allow quicker launches — but would put more stress on the entire system. The engine may have to be tuned to put out the power that can reasonably and economically be handled by the drivetrain and suspension.The Grand Cherokee has a higher center of gravity and too much power could be dangerous.

Regardless, a Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk packing even 580 horsepower would be a major boost over the current 485 horsepower SRT model, and would likely attract even more attention from those who would normally go for a German crossover.

FCA US has already applied for a trademark on the Trackhawk name. The application has passed all the legal hurdles and USPTO approval of registration is now waiting for the company to file a Statement Of Use (SOU) in commerce.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/10/jeep-trackhawk-600-hp-30326

2015 Chrysler 300 has been named one of KBB.com’s ten most comfortable cars under $30,000

The 2015 Chrysler 300 has been named one of KBB.com’s ten most comfortable cars under $30,000. The editors wrote, “Chrysler’s big and bold full-size sedan recalls the glamour and ease of yesteryear in a car that offers all of today’s modern amenities,”

The base price of a 2015 Chrysler 300 Limited is $32,690, including destination charges, but incentives bring it below the $30,000 threshold. A comparably equipped Chevrolet Impala 2LT is $31,110, and it doesn’t have the 300’s outstanding V6/8-speed combination.

In thousands of test miles, many with four adults and luggage, Allpar testing has found that, regardless of trim level, the Chrysler 300 a is standout among non-luxury cars, easily surpassing comparable Ford and GM cars in total passenger comfort over long distances. Even brand-agnostic drivers praise the car’s comfort and driveability.

Often-neglected rear-seat passengers, including those six feet tall, have plenty of room, and the Chrysler 300’s formal roofline makes dignified entry and exit no problem, an advantage over the Dodge Charger.

Allpar real-world testing has shown the Chrysler 300 with the Pentastar V6 cruises effortlessly even at the 80 miles per hour allowed on West Texas highways. We have achieved an easy 33 mpg on long trips at 70-75 mph.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/07/is-chrysler-300-one-the-most-comfortable-cars-under-30k-29271

V10 Dodge Challenger revealed: 2011 Mopar Challenger V-10 Drag Pak

The much-rumored race-only V-10 powered rear-wheel drive 2011 Mopar Challenger Drag Pak was unveiled on October 1, featuring an 8.4-liter, 512 cubic-inch engine with a 2-speed automatic transmission, launched at the Dodge Viper Owner’s Invitational in Salt Lake City, with later appearances scheduled for the Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) show in Las Vegas from Nov. 2-5, and the Performance Racing Industry (PRI) show in Orlando from Dec. 9-11.
Pietro Gorlier, President and CEO of Mopar, said: “With the introduction of our new 2011 Mopar Challenger Drag Pak, Mopar will be the only place to get a factory-built V-10-powered race-ready drag car. Mopar’s new Challenger Drag Pak is a race rocket that will appeal to racers, collectors, dealers, and Dodge Viper owners.”

mopar-challenger-drag-car

Based on the 2011 Dodge Challenger and finished in a Stock Eliminator and Super Stock configuration, the 2011 Mopar Challenger V-10 Drag Pak is the first and only 500-plus cubic-inch V-10 drag-race package car. The car features competition wheels and tires, a Mopar solid rear axle with performance gear ratio, a 2-speed drag race transmission with integrated roll control, a complete competition fuel system with fuel cell, and a complete interior with gauge package.

The Mopar Challenger V-10 Drag Pak features a Bright White paint scheme with color options. The Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) is $85,512 and production begins early next year.
Mopar offers three options with this vehicle. First, the Competition Package includes an eight-point roll cage, six-point safety harness and a mesh window net (MSRP: $7,950, part number P5155820). Second, a Mopar logo body wrap (MSRP: $950, part number P5155892) and a range of body colors (MSRP: $6,800, part number P5155893).

Orders must be submitted using the Mopar Challenger V-10 Drag Pak Application, which is available now at Mopar.com , the Mopar Direct Connection Tech Line at 888-528-HEMI (4364), or a local Dodge dealer. Customers should work with their local Dodge dealer to submit their application.
Allpar notes that the V-10 may be the first appearance of a new Viper engine, or it might be a race-only version that will never see street production. The 6.4 liter Mopar crate engine was never produced for street use, though an engine of identical size, with many differences, is to be installed in 2011 Dodge cars.

– Identification plate with unique serial number sequence; primed and painted body, color options available

– 512 cid V-10 engine

– 2-speed automatic transmission with shift assembly and built-in roll control

– Special body-in-white modified for drag racing

– No windshield wiper assembly, HVAC system (includes block off plates), rear seats, power-steering system, or underbody heat shields

– Complete fuel cell assembly

– Race headers with collectors

– Modified tunnel for transmission clearance and one-piece drive shaft

– Raised floor above differential for solid-axle conversion clearance

– Polycarbonate door windows; smart-glass door window system

– Solid engine mounts

– Mopar solid rear axle

– Lightweight seats to accommodate 6-point harness

– Special modified K-member with drop-out crossmember

– Lightweight drag-race only front brake assembly

– Manual rack-and-pinion steering

– Front chin spoiler

– Lightweight instrument panel assembly and cooling module, with electric fan

– Cable-operated decklid release and cable-operated throttle pedal and linkage

– Race-style wheels and tires

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/cars/dodge/challenger/V10.html