Archive for the ‘indian motorcycle’ Tag

Indian Motorcycle Introduces the 2016 Indian Chieftain Dark Horse

MINNEAPOLIS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Indian Motorcycle, America’s first motorcycle company, today introduced the Indian Chieftain Dark Horse, a blacked-out hard bagger that allows riders to easily customize their ride and hit the highway in head-turning style.

A bagger with undeniable presence, the Chieftain Dark Horse offers a ton of matte black, a flicker of chrome, and a wealth of features to roll as one of the most bad-ass American-made V-twin touring bikes on the market. By all but eliminating chrome from the motorcycle, the Dark Horse conveys an aggressive attitude that demands attention for all the right reasons.

Powered by the celebrated Thunder Stroke 111 engine and built upon the same highly lauded chassis and suspension as the Indian Chieftain, the edgy new Chieftain Dark Horse comes from the factory outfitted with a solo seat and short, tinted power windscreen, yet maintains its spacious hard bags, ABS, electronic cruise control, integrated premium audio system and remote key fob with keyless ignition.

To amplify the Dark Horse family attributes, not only are the fenders, fairing, fuel tank and bags blacked out, the iconic Indian Motorcycle headdress, forks, mirrors, handlebars and switch cubes, turn signals, tank console, engine and airbox cover, lower controls, floorboards and taillight housing are also blacked out.

Indian Motorcycle also offers a large selection of authentic factory accessories to further individualize your already stealthy ride, including new Blackout series accessory air cleaners, performance cams and slip-on exhausts, as well 100-watt saddlebag lid speakers.

“The Indian Chieftain Dark Horse’s blacked-out styling and powerful Thunder Stroke 111 engine will elevate our rider to the top of the pack,” said Reid Wilson, Marketing Director for Indian Motorcycle. “Starting with the award-winning Chieftain platform, the Dark Horse series signature matte black paint and raw attitude is an open canvas for customization that makes it the perfect bike for riders who are ready to ‘Be Legendary’.”

The Indian Chieftain Dark Horse comes with a two-year unlimited mileage factory warranty and is available in dealerships now starting at just $21,999. For more information, visit http://www.IndianMotorcycle.com.

As read on: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160511005206/en/

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INDIAN MOTORCYCLE AND JACK DANIEL’S® PARTNER ON ICONIC LIMITED EDITION JACK DANIEL’S-BRANDED INDIAN CHIEF VINTAGE

Two legendary American brands join forces in handcrafting collectible masterpiece unveiled at Barrett-Jackson auction for the benefit of U.S. Military personnel and their families

MINNEAPOLIS, MN (January 27, 2016) — Indian Motorcycle®, America’s first motorcycle company, today announced it has joined forces with the Jack Daniel Distillery to create the Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s Indian® Chief® Vintage motorcycle. The partnership brings together two of America’s most iconic brands that share a mutual commitment to independence, originality and American craftsmanship that dates back more than a century. The collaboration commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Jack Daniel Distillery, which was registered in 1866.

The 2016 Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s Indian Chief Vintage will on display January 23-31 at the Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Collector Car Auction. It will also make an appearance at a series of events throughout 2016 including Daytona Bike Week, taking place March 4-13. Ultimately, this first-in-the-series display bike will be auctioned at the Barrett-Jackson Auction in Las Vegas, which takes place October 6-8. All monies raised from the charity auction will be donated to support “Operation Ride Home,” a partnership between the Jack Daniel Distillery and the Armed Services YMCA that provides funding and travel assistance to help junior-enlisted military personnel spend time with their families during the holiday season.

“This one-of-a-kind motorcycle is the perfect pairing of these two classic American brands, and while they look great together, we’ve inscribed this unique collector’s edition masterpiece with our ‘Bottles and Throttles Don’t Mix’ mantra to remind all our friends that drinking and riding are meant to be enjoyed separately,” said Dave Stang, Director of Events & Sponsorships for Jack Daniel’s. “We’d like to thank our friends at Indian Motorcycle for their help on this project and their support for Operation Ride Home.”

The Limited Edition Jack Daniel’s Indian Chief Vintage will be produced in very limited quantities, taking the iconic Indian Chief Vintage platform to a whole new level with an array of genuine Indian Motorcycle accessories and custom accessories, as well as Jack Daniel’s-inspired custom paint and logos, badging, leather saddle and saddlebags. The bike’s fender is also inscribed with the names of the seven Master Distillers who have overseen the Jack Daniel’s distilling process over its 150-year history. Final customization work was designed and completed by Brian Klock and his inspired team at Klock Werks in Mitchell, S.D. Additional details on the production schedule and ordering process will be released during Daytona Bike Week.

“It’s a pleasure to partner again with our friends at Jack Daniel’s on this project as a tribute to originality and American craftsmanship, and to do so for the benefit of our military personnel and their families,” said Steve Menneto, President of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “Jack Daniel’s and Indian Motorcycle proudly support our troops, military families and our veterans and we are honored to join forces again in 2016.”

For more information about Operation Ride Home, or to make a tax-deductible donation, please visit: http:// http://www.jdoperationridehome.com

Jack Daniel’s press information can be found at the Jack Daniel’s press room located at http://www.jdpressroom.com. Indian Motorcycle images are also available at the Indian Motorcycle press site at http://www.IMCPress.com.

A Legend Reborn: Indian Motorcycle Unveils the 2016 Scout Sixty

To say Indian Motorcycle has had a tumultuous history would be a major understatement. The brand was founded in 1901 — arguably making it America’s first motorcycle company — and it enjoyed a significant amount of early success, growth, and technological breakthroughs. After World War II took its toll, however, its spot as America’s number one bike manufacturer was snatched up by Harley Davidson, and production eventually ceased in 1953. The nameplate was passed around by a variety of short-lived owners for years, but was eventually put down for good in 2003. Or so we thought.

scout sixty

Indian Motorcycle came back from the dead in 2006, and its 2011 acquisition by Polaris Industries gave it new life. A reliable parent company with financial stability meant that the brand could invest in new projects and technologies, one of which just dropped at the EICMA International Motorcycle Show in Milan, Italy.

It’s called the Scout Sixty, an entry-level cruiser based on the Indian Scout that debuted in 2014. The bike shares its chassis, suspension, and brakes with the classically styled Scout, but it’s been fitted with a smaller, 61-cubic inch (999cc) V-Twin engine to bring the cost down and improve agility. With a starting price of $8,999 in Thunder Black, Indian hopes the Scout Sixty will introduce the company to a new group of customers.

“The Indian Scout has been a stunningly successful introduction for us, with balance, performance and maneuverability that appeals to a broad swath of riders here in America and around the globe,” said Steve Menneto, President of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “The new Scout Sixty expands that reach even further to include newer riders and a younger demographic who long to experience the legendary quality and craftsmanship of an Indian motorcycle.”

As far as the specs go, the Scout Sixty creates 78 horsepower 64 pound-feet of torque in U.S. configuration, all of which is channeled to the ground via a 6-speed gearbox. Dry weight is 542 pounds from the factory, but as usual, buyers can choose from a variety of add-ons to personalize their ride to their liking. The Scout Sixty is en route to dealerships now.

Read more at: http://sports.yahoo.com/news/legend-reborn-indian-motorcycle-unveils-101536088.html;_ylt=A0LEV7ja1ExWYn0AYQwnnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–

Indian Motorcycle Heads to the 75th Annual Sturgis Rally With Entertainment, Events and the All-New 2016 Lineup

MINNEAPOLIS, MN, Jul 23, 2015 (Marketwired via COMTEX) — Indian Motorcycle(R), America’s first motorcycle company, is announcing its power-packed itinerary for the upcoming 75th annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Started in 1938 by Indian Motorcycle dealer J.C. “Pappy” Hoel, close to 1 million attendees are expected this year in recognition of this important milestone for the Rally, which formally runs August 3 – 9 in Sturgis, South Dakota. Join Indian Motorcycle in celebration of all riders for this historic event that will feature the first appearance of the 2016 model year lineup, entertainment, factory demo rides, Indian Motorcycle owner events and rides, an array of custom bikes and much more. The celebration gets a jump start on Friday, July 31 at the Indian Motorcycle display area located on Lazelle St. Visit the Indian Motorcycle Sturgis event page for updates leading up to the rally.

Indian Motorcycle Factory Display on Lazelle St (Next to Lynn’s Dakotamart) Friday, July 31 – Saturday, August 8, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily Explore the entire lineup of 2016 models at the Indian Motorcycle display in Downtown Sturgis. Several new customs will also be on display, including newly-revealed bikes from the “Scout Custom Series” including the Black Bullet Scout and the USO Tribute Scout built by Klock Werks, along with the 2014 Indian “Big Chief Custom,” a new Chieftain custom from Azzkikr Custom Baggers, and more. In addition, a 1948 Chief commemorating the 75th anniversary will be rebuilt on-site by Starklite Cycle during the rally. A brand-new “torque pit,” demonstrating the power and torque of the Indian Motorcycle lineup will run throughout each day, and an interactive timeline will highlight Indian Motorcycle’s founding of the rally and its important place in motorcycling history.

In celebration of Indian Motorcycle’s roots at Sturgis, rally attendees can fuel up from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. each day with complimentary coffee and donuts — a tradition started by Pearl Hoel, wife of rally founder “Pappy” Hoel. Attendees can also sign-up to win one of five limited edition Chiefs, get their photo taken on a custom Indian Scout Hill Climb bike, purchase Indian Motorcycle apparel, sign a commemorative rider map and more.

Limited Edition Model Year 2016 Chief Classic Giveaway Sunday, August 2 and Thursday, August 6 Five limited edition Chief Classics will be given away during the rally. On Sunday and Thursday, the bikes will be raffled off live in the Lazelle St. space (visit location to learn exact time). These beautiful, Model Year 2016 Classics are available during the rally only, and will only be available to rally participants. Entries can be obtained with scan of Indian Motorcycle RFID badges at Indian events and locations during the rally; see the registration booth on Lazelle St. to get a badge.

Factory Demo Rides, 2100 Whitewood Service Road (I-90 on Exit 30)

Saturday, August 1 – Saturday, August 8, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily Join the Indian Motorcycle demo team and test ride the latest models fresh from the Spirit Lake, Iowa plant. New Model Year 2016 motorcycles will be ready to demo ride all week long representing every variation and color and some fully accessorized. Demo ride availability is on a first-come, first-served basis. Rides will head out daily starting at 9:15 a.m. with the last ride leaving at 4:30 p.m. Riders must be 18 years of age and must provide proof of endorsement along with a helmet and appropriate riding attire. Passengers with protective gear are welcome to ride with no endorsement needed.

“Black Hills Heritage Ride presented by Indian Motorcycle”: Ride-in to Sturgis with American Iron Magazine Thursday, July 30 – Sunday, August 2 Join Buzz Kanter and the editors of American Iron Magazine as they ride vintage and modern motorcycles to Sturgis. The ride will kick off at the acclaimed National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa with a complimentary dinner on Thursday, July 30 and will conclude in Sturgis on Sunday, August 2. The ride route will explore backroads and celebrate both great heritage Indian bikes and modern models. The ride is free and open to all who are interested in joining, regardless of motorcycle manufacturer.

“America’s Block Party” (Between Victory Motorcycles and Indian Motorcycle displays on Lazelle St.) Friday, July 31 – Saturday, August 8, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily Join Indian Motorcycle, Victory Motorcycles, Polaris Slingshot(R) and partner Jack Daniel’s at the biggest party in Sturgis. “America’s Block Party” will feature live music daily, the Jack Daniel’s Experience, beverages available for purchase, complimentary patch sewing, and much more. In addition, the following special appearances will take place courtesy of Jack Daniel’s:

— NASCAR Vice Chairman Mike Helton and Rusty Wallace former driver of
the #2 Cup series Car in NASCAR and now TV commentator, Monday, August
3, 11 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

— Jack Daniel’s Master Distiller Jeff Arnett, Monday, August 3, 3 p.m. –
4 p.m.

— 9/11 Never Forget Mobile Museum, August 2 – 4, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
(across the street)

“Veterans Charity Ride to Sturgis” Welcome Event Sunday, August 2, 3:30 p.m., Lazelle St. Display Join us as we welcome a group of American heroes to America’s motorcycle rally. The riders of the “Veterans Charity Ride to Sturgis,” sponsored by Indian Motorcycle, will be concluding eight days on the road from Los Angeles to Sturgis riding across the country they helped defend on Indian motorcycles. These brave men and women from all branches of the military, some with multiple traumatic amputations, will arrive to a warm and patriotic welcome at the Indian Motorcycle display on Lazelle Street.

Indian Motorcycle Night at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip and Reveal of Roland Sands Design / GEICO Custom Indian Chieftain Sunday, August 2, 9:50 p.m., Legendary Sturgis Buffalo Chip(TM) On Sunday night, a fired-up audience will get a chance to see the unveiling of a new custom-built GEICO Motorcycle — the GEICO custom Indian Chieftain built by Roland Sands Designs. The RSD team will reveal the bike on the Wolfman Jack Stage at the Legendary Sturgis Buffalo Chip. The night’s entertainment will include: 38 Special, The Guess Who and Brantley Gilbert.

“Military Monday” Monday, August 3, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Lazelle St. Display Indian Motorcycle will honor and salute veterans and those who serve on “Military Monday” with a complimentary gift for those with a current or honorably discharged Military I.D. Visit the display on Lazelle St. for more information. As a benefit to Indian Motorcycle’s military partner, The USO, and Victory Motorcycles’ military partner, IAVA, riders using the complimentary parking behind the factory display on Lazelle St. throughout the week are encouraged to make a donation.

“Indian Motorcycle & Classic American Iron Rally” Tuesday, August 4, Crossroads at the Buffalo Chip, 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. Indian Motorcycle and American Iron Magazine are sponsoring a heritage motorcycle celebration at the Buffalo Chip. The event is free to attend and free to register any model year Indian bike or pre-1984 classic American motorcycle. Riders can check out dozens of historic machines from all brands, and will feature a bike show and contest. Class winners will be announced at 4 p.m.

Mike Wolfe Autograph Session Wednesday, August 5, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. Stop by the Indian Motorcycle display on Lazelle St. for an up close and personal autograph session with Mike Wolfe, star of “American Pickers” on HISTORY and avid Indian Motorcycle fan.

Indian Motorcycle Riders Group (IMRG) and Owner Events Monday, August 3 – Sunday, August 9 Owners, past, present and future are invited to join Indian Motorcycle for exclusive owner activities throughout Rally Week.

— On Tuesday, August 4 at 11:30 a.m. owners are invited to attend a
complimentary Owners Lunch at Game Lodge Pavilion in Custer State
Park. Pre-registration is required and owners can sign up HERE.

— Owners are also invited on Wednesday, August 5 to the Indian
Motorcycle of Sturgis dealership for an owners-only open house and
Wall of Death Show at 10:30 a.m.

Throughout Rally Week, owners will receive a commemorative gift when they present their key FOB at the dealership or the Indian exhibit on Lazelle St. IMRG members can also show their membership card for an additional gift.

Indian Motorcycle of Sturgis Dealership Open 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. daily at 2130 Main St. Visit the Indian Motorcycle of Sturgis dealership’s recently opened 22,000 square foot showroom. The American Motor Drome Wall of Death, featuring the custom 2015 Wall of Death Scout, will be at the dealership with shows each hour starting at 11 a.m., courtesy of Indian Motorcycle. The showroom offers an expanded parts and customization department as well as additional service bays. The dealership is giving away limited edition prizes and will have commemorative 75th anniversary items for sale. For more information please visit: http://www.indianmotorcyclesturgis.com.

“We promise a jam-packed week of activity for this rally, and we’re going to deliver,” said Steve Menneto, vice president of motorcycles at Polaris Industries. “We look forward to visiting with our friends and riders at the displays and celebrating the Diamond Anniversary of Pappy Hoel’s little get-together that, through the years, has turned into the biggest motorcycle rally in the world.”

ABOUT INDIAN MOTORCYCLE(R) Indian Motorcycle, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Polaris Industries Inc. PII, -2.20% is America’s first motorcycle company. Founded in 1901, Indian Motorcycle has won the hearts of motorcyclists around the world and earned distinction as one of America’s most legendary and iconic brands through unrivaled racing dominance, engineering prowess and countless innovations and industry firsts. Today that heritage and passion is reignited under new brand stewardship. To learn more, please visit http://www.indianmotorcycle.com.

ABOUT POLARIS(R) INDUSTRIES Polaris is a recognized leader in the powersports industry with annual 2014 sales of $4.5 billion. Polaris designs, engineers, manufactures and markets innovative, high quality off-road vehicles, including all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and the Polaris RANGER(R) and RZR(R) side-by-side vehicles, snowmobiles, motorcycles and on-road electric/hybrid powered vehicles.

Polaris is among the global sales leaders for both snowmobiles and off-road vehicles and has established a presence in the heavyweight cruiser and touring motorcycle market with the Victory(R) and Indian Motorcycle(R) and Slingshot(R) brands. Additionally, Polaris continues to invest in the global on-road small electric/hybrid powered vehicle industry with Global Electric Motorcars (GEM), Goupil Industrie SA, Aixam Mega S.A.S., and internally developed vehicles. Polaris enhances the riding experience with a complete line of Polaris Engineered Parts, Accessories and Apparel, Klim branded apparel and ORV accessories under the Kolpin(R), Cycle Country(R) and Pro Armor(R) brands.

Polaris Industries Inc. trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “PII”, and the Company is included in the S&P Mid-Cap 400 stock price index.

Information about the complete line of Polaris products, apparel and vehicle accessories are available from authorized Polaris dealers or anytime at http://www.polaris.com.

Read more at: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/indian-motorcycle-heads-to-the-75th-annual-sturgis-rally-with-entertainment-events-and-the-all-new-2016-lineup-2015-07-23

Hail to the Indian Chief Motorcycle

There’s a good chance, many years from now, that history will judge this particular red-and-white 1948 Indian Chief as one of the most important Indian motorcycles on the planet. No, it wasn’t owned by Steve McQueen or any other celebrity; it’s not a special VIN, not the only or the first or the last of anything; it certainly didn’t win any races or set any speed records either. It’s unremarkable except for one fact: This is the motorcycle that spent two years parked in the Polaris design studio, where it served as the visual inspiration and literal touchstone for the design team that reinterpreted the vintage Indian style for the modern era.

This bike isn’t a static showpiece. It’s fully operational, and Indian Product Director Gary Gray offered us the unique opportunity to ride this vintage classic side by side with the modern Chief that carries so much of its DNA in its lines and design. Gray is the person who actually located this bike for Polaris, negotiating the purchase from a Minnesota collector shortly after Polaris acquired the Indian brand in 2011. It’s a 1948 Chief with the mid-level Sportsman trim package, distinguished by the chromed crashbars, handlebar, headlight and spotlights, and “De Luxe” solo saddle. Riding this bike alongside the 2014 Chief Vintage reveals how far bikes have come in 66 years—it feels like light-years—but it’s surprising how similar the two bikes feel in certain ways. That’s a testament to the fine job Gray and company did translating the old glory to a new generation.

The first difference you notice is scale. Wheelbase and seat height are roughly similar, but the vintage bike, weighing just 550 pounds, is almost 250 pounds lighter than the modern machine. This makes the older bike easier to maneuver, especially pushing it around a parking lot, and it handles well at speed too. Sixteen-inch wheels are concealed under those deep fender skirts, and the ride is surprisingly smooth thanks to the coil-sprung, hydraulically damped girder fork and “Double Action” plunger-sprung rear frame (each shock carries two springs: a top spring for cushioning and a bottom spring for damping) that was a cut above Harley’s then-current rigid frame/sprung saddle combination.

The 74ci (1,200cc), 42-degree flathead V-twin, with roots reaching back to 1920, was already obsolete in 1948 ( Harley-Davidson released its overhead-valve Panhead that same year), but with roughly 50 hp and a broad spread of torque it’s adequate for back-road cruising. Top speed is said to be near 100 mph, but it’s happier nearer the double nickel where it doesn’t feel (and sound) like it’s going to shake itself apart. Besides, the drum brakes—the front all but useless and the back not much better—can’t compete with more velocity than that.

The control layout is utterly unlike the modern bike. Both grips rotate. The right grip “controls” the Linkert carburetor; the left rotates the automotive-type distributor to manually retard or advance the spark for easier starting. “Controls” is in quotes because any grip input to the crude, poorly atomizing Linkert is a mere suggestion. Engine response lags behind grip input by a few seconds, and the lack of a throttle return spring and a solid throttle wire—not a cable—makes rev-matching during shifting all but impossible. Speaking of shifting, there’s no clutch lever. Instead there’s a foot clutch on the left floorboard (a rocker clutch you have to manually engage and disengage, not a spring-loaded “suicide” clutch) and a hand-shifter on the left side of the fuel tank.

Temporarily rewiring your brain to smoothly manipulate that rocker clutch with your foot and fluidly change the cantankerous, non-synchronized, three-speed gearbox with your left hand is the biggest challenge, but once you get the vintage Chief up to speed it’s a delightful back-road ride, with a perfectly upright riding position that’s more natural and less slouchy than the clamshelled hunch the newer bike demands. It’s a classic American motorcycle experience, and Gray and his team have done an excellent job of transposing this vintage vibe onto the new machine. Starting with such sound genetic material as this, though, how could they go wrong?

As read on: http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/hail-to-indian-chief-motorcycle

2015 Indian Scout – Road Test Review

A motorcycle is never just a motorcycle, and the all-new 2015 Indian Scout takes that truth to its extreme. The Sturgis Rally started 74 years ago, during the last moments of the original-lineage Indian Scout’s production. This year, after waiting nearly all of those seven decades, the rally was reunited with this sporty old friend. Sounds romantic, doesn’t it? But it’s complicated.

Until last year, the mud and clay and gravel the Indian name has been dragged through for fully half of its history had been caked on thickly. Polaris, Indian’s newest owner, has done an excellent job of hosing the brand clean and giving it the fresh start it deserved. The Chief and its Chiefy siblings did that by being a new old that’s an updated reflection of the last Springfield design, using a flat-head look for its fully modern air-/oil-cooled, pushrod, OHV, 49-degree V-twin engine, with those big fenders and much chrome. But it’s not news that heritage American iron is a hot seller.

Taking a bolder route, the new Scout desires to be the potential future of a past that never happened, looking for an acceptable narrative to span back to the bike’s far-off beginnings. So does this Scout convincingly carry the Indian heritage forward, and is it functionally a motorcycle you’d want to ride?

The Scout is a modern interpretation of how the evolution of the American V-twin might have gone, without following the calculated semi-Luddite lead of the Chief. The Scout gives a modern answer to this historical question, trying to be what it would be if the model had evolved organically without interruption. There are a thousand answers to this proposition, and all of them are colored by romance, desire, and longing. So don’t insist that Indian’s answer is right or wrong; this Scout is a modern cruiser, its chassis a refraction through the lens of history, its engine a nod to modern times, its EFI for the EPA, all topped off with a damn nice old-school seat.

We’re here to tell you the bike feels good, and a primary part of this is the 69ci (1,133cc), liquid-cooled, 60-degree, V-twin engine that uses chain-driven DOHC and four valves per cylinder fed by a single 60mm throttle body. It’s a semi-dry sump design with a 9,000-rpm redline. High-ish 10.7:1 compression makes it hungry for high-test. The Scout produced 86 hp at 7,730 rpm and 64 pound-feet of torque at 3,320 rpm on the CW dyno. The bigger story on the torque curve is that there are more than 60 pound-feet from 2,400 to 7,400 rpm, and it is a gorgeous straight line of smooth delivery. The cylinders and heads have no fake cooling fins but do have structural ribbing and other aluminum-colored accents.

A six-speed transmission and a left-side final-drive belt transmit power to the rear wheel. The Scout is geared to comfortably roll along at 70 mph in sixth gear at 3,750 rpm, yet with that broad torque production it pulls away easily from a stop. Clutch feel is good, and engagement is smooth and easy.

The suspension is pretty conventional at each end: 41mm fork legs up front and dual, spring-preload-adjustable shocks out back. There’s a claimed 4.7 inches of front-wheel travel and 3.0 inches of travel at the rear. Notice the extreme rake of those shocks, to mimic the hardtail lines of the 1920s Scout. With preload in the delivered setting and without a rider in the saddle, the Scout’s rear suspension tops out with zero sag. With my 150 pounds on board, the rear end tops out on rebound when riding over large bumps. Heavier testers on staff did not experience this. A preload wrench is supplied, but there is no provision to store it on the bike.

The Scout has a single 298mm rotor at each end, with a two-piston caliper up front and a single piston out back. Other notables include a super-low 27.0-inch brown-leather-seat height (as measured in the CW shop with rear spring preload set as delivered; claimed height is 26.5 inches). The seat is so low that swinging a leg over it is no different than stepping over a crack in a root-heaved sidewalk. It’s also covered in more weather-resistant leather than that used in 2014.

The Scout has a multipiece aluminum chassis that saves weight through rational design. The front downtubes are a one-piece casting that incorporates the steering head and additionally serve as the radiator shrouds. Out back is a one-piece casting that includes the swingarm plates and tailsection. These front and rear castings bolt to the bottom front and rear of the engine, which is a stressed member without frame elements beneath it. Two side-by-side, multipiece backbones from the steering head to the rear casting tie the structure together above the engine.

Wheelbase is a rangy 61.0 inches, and the Scout is relaxed in rake and trail, having 29 degrees of the first and 4.7 inches of the latter. The wheels at both ends are of the same dimensions—16 x 3.5 inches—but carry different size Kenda tires: a 130/90-16 72H up front and a 150/80-16 71H rear. These fat tires on little wheels disguise the Scout’s smaller-than-normal size; it’s a 7/8-scale cruiser, à la Smokey Yunick.

Indian, of course, targeted the Sportster, and most of the rest of us will make that comparison too. This is valid in the market and in our minds, but the riding experience really is very different. Still: Compared to the last Sportster 1200 Custom we tested, the Scout is about 6 pounds lighter, made 18 more horsepower and 9 less pound-feet of torque, has a sixth gear, and costs $300 more than a 2014 model. Plus, there’s got to be an easy additional 40 hp hiding in this engine. Basically, it’s untenable that Indian could create the overriding competency of this bike yet have the converse incompetence for its modern, efficient powerplant of 1,133cc to not be capable of 140 hp. It’ll be interesting to see what happens to output on this engine in future models or when breathing on it, remapping it, etc.

The Scout is one of the best-balanced shapes of any cruiser-type motorcycle made, successfully carrying forward the lines and proportions of the 1928 Scout to work in the modern world, as the designers intended. The headlight is basically a copy of the one used on pre-war models, and the forward-slanting fuel tank maintains the original Scout’s go-fast look.

We were first given the chance to ride the Scout on the winding roads of South Dakota’s Black Hills then got one back at our Southern California HQ for full instrumented testing and more mileage. The seating position is right on for a 5-foot-10 rider, with a comfortable reach to the bars and foot controls, and Indian offers fitment options for riders at the far ends of adult sizes. The stock solo leather seat is grand, and after a long day on the road there was none of that burning-cheek feeling. (A passenger pad and pegs are available.) The non-adjustable hand levers are well placed, and the mirrors provide a good rear view, though adjustment tended to wander if the stalks weren’t set to allow the mirrors to be in the center of their swivel-ball adjustment range.

The Scout is smooth and swift from a dead stop. The EFI is crisp across the rev range, transitioning from on-off changes without the hesitation or glitch. The throttle has a linear, almost rheostatic relationship to engine output. At low rpm, engine vibration is close to nil. At high revs, particularly 5,000 rpm and up, the engine did produce quite a bit of a buzz. At 70 mph in sixth, the Scout engine is smooth, but a few testers sensed some buzz at 75-plus.

On the quiet end of the rev range, the Scout is tame and can be ridden as a comfortable, easy-to-handle cruiser for beginners, or it can be railed down a twisty highway as a low-slung performance bike, perfectly behaved at both ends of that scale. Third gear works great for bombing corners on a winding road, and 6,500 to 7,500 is the sweet rev range for instant-on power and prime engine braking. This is not air-cooled V-twin instant low-end response like from a 1200 Sportster.

The transmission on the Scout we rode around Sturgis was certain and smooth with short throws and no missed shifts. The 450-mile testbike we got in California was inconsistent on the 1-2 upshift and could be a bit vague on other shifts. We’d like to see more positive shift action front this gearbox.

It’s surprising that a bike so heaped with historical responsibility can also be such a hoot at bombing the twisties. The 16-inch tires work great with the well-damped suspension to make for sure handling and no skittishness in fast corners, with neutral chassis behavior even when trail braking hard down to the apex. Cornering clearance is decent for the class, but the handling character makes you wish for more lean angle.

Steering at low speeds is light and precise, and the low center of gravity rewards the use of both brakes. Although the single front disc has good feel and light effort, a second front disc would be welcome.

For comfortable, sporty cruising, and for carrying the Indian torch, the new Scout succeeds. It’s a modern interpretation of the name, a reflection of heritage, not an imitation of outdated technologies. Fit and finish is excellent, and colors include red and black plus matte finishes in smoked black and smoked silver.

Indian has made a big bet with the Scout and worked hard to make a statement at its Sturgis launch. It hired the American Motor Drome Company’s Wall of Death and Charlie Ransom (who looks as though he just stepped out of Ray Bradbury’s Something Wicked This Way Comes) to take a modded version of this bike to the boards. That was seriously impressive. It’s not common for a manufacturer to associate itself with a daredevil sideshow, yet Indian rolled out its Scout in old-school carnival style: scary, dangerous, fantastic, with no hands. And it was real. If this were the only true beginning of this Scout’s history, it’s a damn great start.

As read on: http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/10/30/2015-indian-scout-road-test-cruiser-motorcycle-review-photos-specifications/

Part Two: A Closer Look at Indian Motorcycles

As part of our ongoing automotive and motorcycle coverage, we’re taking a couple days to take a close up look at Indian Motorcycles and the business of challenging an industry giant like Harley-Davidson. Today, we check in with an industry expert for an objective look at Indian’s operations.

Basem Wasef, motorcycle journalist, author and industry expert explained that Polaris’s resuscitation of the Indian brand has been both “brilliant and painfully obvious.”

“Polaris has applied considerable financial investment toward bringing back a legendary nameplate, creating relatively reliable modern motorcycles that pay homage to bikes which were arguably better in nostalgic retrospect than they were in reality,” Wasef said. “But at its core, Indian is less about the motorcycles themselves, and more about the power of a brand.”

Menneto evidently agrees: “We can’t build to match Harley’s capacity, but we can build a brand that’s popular as an alternative — that’s popular with a dedicated customer base with which we can build a relationship. Rather that match the size and capacity of Harley-Davidson, we’d rather compare with premium brands like BMW or Ducati.”

Wasef stressed that challenging Harley-Davidson’s market share would have been unthinkable if Polaris had created a new brand altogether.

“When it comes to brand perception, established Japanese manufactures like Suzuki, Yamaha, and Honda still can’t touch Harley-Davidson in the areas of authenticity and that inscrutable sense of cool,” Wasef added. “But by adopting a nameplate that’s older than H-D and happens to be associated with larger-than-life personalities like Steve McQueen and Burt Munro, Polaris has taken on a serious challenge and dipped their toe into a potentially lucrative business.”

Indian’s slow build is still in effect. For three years, all Indian Motorcycles built were the Chief and Chieftain models — ranging in price from about $19,000 to $23,000. For the first time since the company made its return to business, it introduced new bikes this year — expanding its line at the top and bottom with the $27,000 Roadmaster and the $10.000 Scout.

The latter is especially important as it reaches out to less affluent buyers with its smaller price tag. If Indian wants to compete with H-D, they’re now trying to get to riders when they’re young and equipped with less disposable income.

Steven D. Menneto, Vice President for Motorcycles at Indian, admitted that Indian is still not building to full capacity as that all-important five year business plan unfolds. The next phase for Indian looks to be expanding to more international markets in Europe and South Africa to diversify that brand loyalty. Only time will tell if this classic American make will stand the test of time in a new business era of high-tech and international competition.

Wasef insisted it will still take significant amounts of time to make a dent against the Harley-Davidson juggernaut.

“But, considering the aggressive product development that has occurred since the new Indian models were revealed one year ago, Indian looks like it will be a serious force to be reckoned with moving forward.”

As read on: http://www.craveonline.com/lifestyle/cars-auto-motorcyles/781713-part-two-closer-look-indian-motorcycles

THIS WEEKEND Join us for our Indian Motorcycle Demo Event – Friday & Saturday, August 22nd & 23rd

ONLY 2 MORE DAYS!!!

2015 indian motorcycles

Join us
THIS Friday and Saturday,
August 22nd and 23rd for our Indian Motorcycle
Demo Ride Event!

Come on by and ride ALL the New 2015 Indian Motorcycles,
including the New Indian Roadmaster and Indian Scout!

Reserve your Indian Scout during our event and be one of the first to
own with these exclusive offers only available with Scout’s First Run Program.

*Industry-leading 5 Years of Coverage

*Special Commemorative First to Own Kit
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

**Friday Rides will take place from 11am – 6pm**
**Saturday Rides will take place from 11am – 4pm**

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Saturday’s Ride will also include our
Customer Appreciation Event!

– 10:30am – 12:30pm: 101 WRIF – FM Detroit’s Screamin Scott Randall will be here

– 12:30pm – 4:30pm: LIVE Music by The Blackjack BAND

– Food and Refreshments Saturday by Art’s Tamales!

Don’t miss your chance to ride a new Indian Motorcycles!!

http://www.ClassicMotorcyclesDetroit.com

Safe Riding Tips for Motorcycle Safety Month

Though we Indian Motorcycle riders like to stand out from the crowd, we do so with the utmost respect for others and for ourselves. During Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, Indian Motorcycle reminds you to ride safe with the following tips.

Never operate a vehicle if you have been using alcohol or are otherwise impaired.

Wear proper safety gear. Indian Motorcycle recommends DOT approved helmet, closed-toe shoes, eye protection, long pants, jacket, and riding gloves.

Ride within your limits. Safely operate the vehicle with respect for the conditions and within your abilities.

Keep your machine well-maintained.

Follow all traffic laws and posted signs and markers.

Anticipate the unexpected.

Promote a safe riding culture with your friends, family and community.

As read on: http://www.indianmotorcycle.com/en-us/stories/ride-safe?wt.mc_id=C8974218-8EDB-E311-BA99-0050569A00BC&wt.mc_ev=email&WT.mc_id=

WIN A 2015 VICTORY GUNNER PLUS A TRIP TO MEET THE NESS FAMILY TO HAVE IT PERSONALLY CUSTOMIZED

Victory Announces the Custom Ness Sweepstakes
Picture this: you and Arlen Ness, hanging out at the shop, having a beer and customizing your brand new 2015 Victory Gunner. Sound like a dream? With the Victory Custom Ness Sweepstakes, it’s a dream that will become a reality for one lucky winner. Victory is going over the top to celebrate their riders, by offering up the chance to not only win a new Gunner, but to also meet Arlen, Cory, and Zach Ness in California, and have the bike personally customized. No catch, no strings – just a dream opportunity Victory is excited to make available to one very lucky motorcycle enthusiast.

Enter to win the Custom Ness Sweepstakes February 8 – March 26 at Victorymotorcycles.com. One lucky winner gets a new 2015 Victory Gunner, and up to $5000 in parts to have it personally customized by the Ness Family. In addition, the winner will receive a 3 day/2 night trip to Dublin, California, where they’ll meet Arlen, Cory, and Zach Ness. Together, they’ll craft a new custom Gunner with one of the best-known, hottest bike-building teams in the world of custom motorcycles.

The new 2015 Victory Gunner is Victory’s hottest new bike. It’s the bobber without comprise, boasting a powerful 106ci V-twin on a full-size chassis, a lowered seat height, and lean-angle engineering that makes it ride like no other bobber currently on the market. “I don’t know a biker alive who doesn’t love to trick out their bike. And the Ness Family? Come on! These guys are legends in customization,” says Steve Menneto, VP-Motorcycles at Victory Motorcycles. “Offering up a new Gunner and the chance to get to spend time with the Ness’s, and then have the bike personally customized – this is as cool as it gets.”
Arlen Ness also commented, “The new Gunner is already a beautiful bike; this is gonna really be a fun one to work on. Victory makes amazing bikes, and the Gunner absolutely holds up to the brand’s standards. Let’s get this thing started; we’re ready to meet the winner of the Custom Ness Sweepstakes!” The Victory Custom Ness Sweepstakes is open to consumers February 8th at Victorymotorcycles.com. Must be 18 to enter, no purchase necessary. For complete details, visit victorymotorcycles.com.

As read on: http://www.hotbikeweb.com/events/win-2015-victory-gunner