Archive for the ‘chrysler 300’ Tag

Enter today for your chance to win a 2017 Chrysler 300

In honor of Joanne Lindsay’s memory, the Dick Scott family has donated the brand new Chrysler 300 to the Ted Lindsay Foundation to be raffled off. The drawing will take place at The 17th Annual Ted Lindsay Foundation Celebrity Golf Outing being held on Monday, September 11, 2017 at Detroit Golf Club. Each raffle ticket is $99.00 and all proceeds will go directly to the Ted Lindsay Foundation efforts.

 

To purchase your ticket or for more information Click Here!

 

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Chrysler celebrates nine decades of driving innovation

It has been nine decades since Walter P. Chrysler founded the car company that bears his name, and today, as it was in the beginning, Chrysler is on the forefront of design and innovation.

By being a leader in these areas, Chrysler has made cutting edge vehicles that are both stylish and fun to drive for customers.

These traits of innovation and cutting edge design at an affordable price can be found today in the Chrysler 200, Chrysler 300 and Chrysler Town & Country.

These modern-day models draw upon the foundation laid more than 90 years ago by Walter P. Chrysler, who was leading Maxwell Motors in 1924 and released the first automobile to carry the Chrysler name, the Chrysler Six. The car featured a six-cylinder engine and four-wheel hydraulic brakes.

This spirit of innovation – and providing a safe vehicle at a fair price – continued after Chrysler founded Chrysler Corporation in 1925.

“He wanted to be a player in the industry,” said FCA US Manager of Historical Archives Brandt Rosenbusch, who stated that Chrysler focused on continuous improvement, firm engineering and building a safe vehicle at a fair price. “He always hoped to have a car bearing his name.”

The company soon introduced cars named after their top speed, such as the Chrysler 72 and the high-end Imperial model that competed against Cadillac.

In the 1930s as the Great Depression gripped the country, the company remained competitive with affordable cars and technological advancements, including “Floating Power,” which reduced the vibration felt from the engine in the body of the car. Chrysler also introduced the downdraft carburetor, automatic spark control and rustproofed, welded steel bodies.

It was also during this decade that the groundbreaking Chrysler Airflow was introduced. The car, which was introduced in 1934, took its design cues from aircraft with aerodynamic features in a teardrop shape.

Walter P. Chrysler pictured with a Chrysler Airflow model.

While it impressed the engineering community, it wasn’t commercially successful. But the new body construction and engine placement signaled a new age of automobile design.

The start of the new decade also marked the end of an era as Walter P. Chrysler died in August 1940. Despite the death of the company founder, Chrysler continued to move forward with innovations, such as the development of a four-speed gearbox with two ranges, the introduction of the Thunderbolt and the Town & Country sedan.

When the nation went to war, Chrysler halted civilian production of automobiles in 1942 and retooled. Among the products Chrysler made for the war effort included the M-4 Sherman tank, “Sea Mule” marine tugs and Chrysler-Bell air raid sirens.

The end of the war in 1945 allowed Chrysler to resume production of civilian vehicles, and led to the release of new, more powerful engines in the 1950s.

In 1951, Chrysler introduced its hemispheric-head V-8 engine – also known as the HEMI, which was initially installed in the Chrysler Saratoga, New Yorker and Imperial. The Chrysler 300 was introduced in 1955 and featured a 300-horsepower HEMI, which not only made it the most powerful full-size car in the world, but also a force to be reckoned with on the NASCAR circuit. The Kiekhaefer Mercury Outboard Racing team won 20 of its 40 NASCAR races.

The company’s entire line of cars was honored in 1957 with Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year” award, and that same year, Chrysler introduced the first rear window defogger and child guard rear door locks.

This focus on design and safety continued into the 1960s as Chrysler moved to unibody construction, which not only improved fuel economy, but also provided greater protection to passengers in a crash. The company also offered the first five-year, 100,000-mile powertrain warranty.

In the 1970s, Chrysler began to offer smaller vehicles in response to fuel shortages and oil embargoes. While the company pivoted on the size of cars, it continued to offer new features, including electronic ignition.

The decade also saw the introduction of actor Ricardo Montalban as the pitchman for the Chrysler Cordoba in 1975, and three years later, Lee Iacocca was named president of Chrysler Corporation.

With the arrival of the 1980s, the company was dealing with a financial crisis, which led to a new generation of vehicles for the company. The Aries and Reliant K-cars were introduced in 1982 along with the front-wheel-drive Chrysler LeBaron. Then, in 1984, a whole new segment was introduced into the automotive industry with the minivan. The front-wheel-drive, compact van created a new segment in the automotive market and became an industry standard in the decades following its release.

The 1990s brought the debut of new sedans, minivan enhancements and the return of a familiar nameplate. The Concorde sedan debuted in 1993 and featured a new “cab forward” design, which created more interior cabin room for passengers. Two years later, Chrysler introduced the mid-size Chrysler Cirrus, which also featured the “cab forward” design.

The third generation of minivan was introduced in 1996 with new features, including a second sliding door for the passenger side Easy-Out roller seats. Chrysler brought back the 300 nameplate in 1999, and the 300M sedan was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year.”

As the decade came to end, Chrysler merged with Daimler and launched a number of new vehicles in the start of the new millennium. The fourth-generation minivan was introduced with new features, such as a power liftgate. In 2001, the PT Cruiser debuted and was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year.” The Chrysler Pacifica was introduced in 2004 and was predecessor to today’s popular crossover segment.

A rear-wheel-drive Chrysler 300 was introduced in 2005 and was named Motor Trend’s “Car of the Year.”

After undergoing bankruptcy, and becoming part of FIAT, the company introduced the new Chrysler 200 mid-size sedan in 2014, which included a number of affordable luxury features, such as lane departure warning, heated steering wheel and an all-wheel-drive system.

Ninety years ago, Chrysler founded what was known as “Detroit’s engineering company,” according to Rosenbusch, and that founding principle has remained in the company’s DNA with powerful engines, the latest in passenger safety technology and even creating a new segment – the minivan.

“(Chrysler) engineers have continued to develop and bring innovations into the Chrysler brand and models,” Rosenbusch said.

Stay tuned to see what Chrysler brand has to offer over the next 90 years.

Read more at: http://blog.fcanorthamerica.com/2015/09/24/chrysler-celebrates-nine-decades-of-driving-innovation/

WPC Package for 300 Coming

Sources have now confirmed that there will be a Walter P. Chrysler Anniversary Package for the flagship Chrysler 300/300C.

2015 marks 90 years since turnaround artist Walter P. Chrysler created an empty shell of a company to buy the full assets of Maxwell Motors, which had already started making Chrysler branded cars in 1924. In the ensuing years, the Maxwell car would be renamed the Chrysler Four for a single year before being rebranded as the Plymouth.

The contents of the package are still unknown, but past Walter P. Chrysler packages (including the one pictured) have generally included extra badging and “free options.” It is not due for production until fall, but ordering should be open in July or so.
Maxwell Motors, the company which made the first Chryslers, was founded in 1904, so that Chrysler could be said to be 111 years old now. Maxwell was the lead company of the United States Motor Company, founded in 1910 to compete against the fledgling General Motors, along with Dayton (1905), Stoddard (1904), Sampson (1904 but based on Moyea, founded in 1902), Columbia (which acquired Pope Motor Carriage, founded in 1899, and also went back to the Riker Electric Motor Company, founded in 1884), and Brush (1906).

United States Motor lasted for three years before changing its name to Standard Motor, a change which lasted less than a year, when it was taken over and named to Maxwell Motor Company, after its most (or only) successful brand. Along the way, it absorbed Flanders Motor.

Read more on: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/06/wpc-package-for-300-coming-28942

Chrysler compact still coming

The Chrysler compact car, normally referred to as the 100, is still on the way, according to both the company’s strategic plan and insiders.

Some believe the forthcoming Chrysler is closely linked to the new Fiat Linea replacement, which will be unveiled shortly. It seems likely that most of the work will be done by Fiat, which traditionally has more expertise in small cars, especially since Chrysler itself has its hands full with yet more revisions to its pickups, work on next-generation large cars, Dart upgrades, nine-speed fixes, the next-generation Compass, new minivans, possibly bringing over a Ram version of the big Daily commercial van, and other projects.

At minimum, Chrysler is likely to retune the suspension to fit American roads, and adjust the interior and exterior styling to match American tastes. Unfortunately, the Microsoft-based Fiat Blue & Me system, now renamed UConnect, may be the only connectivity system available, at least on lower models.

The company recently trademarked the Hornet name, first used by Hudson for its only “small” car, then used by AMC (the company formed by the merger of Hudson and Nash), and made famous by the movie Cars. So far, there has been no indication of what the name might be used on — they may replace Dart or Avenger with Hornet, or set up a midsized, rear-wheel-drive hatchback or coupe with the name — but it’s possible, albeit unlikely, that it will be used for the small compact Chrysler.

The launch of the upcoming Chrysler car might be timed so that it comes close to the relaunch of the Dodge Dart. Some observers believe that the Dart will be made into more of a niche car, perhaps with the lowest performance version matching today’s Dart GT, or having a turbocharged “Hurricane” engine, while the Chrysler 100 will cater to the mainstream.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/05/chrysler-compact-still-coming-28662

Chrysler 300 Interior Bowls Over Competition

Is it any wonder American consumers ignore large cars and instead shop the abundant crop of functional, sometimes sporty CUVs?

WardsAuto’s Large Car segment is a lonely place, with only four entries, and sales through March are down 14% while the car market overall is flat, according to WardsAuto data.

Two years ago, the newest entry was the Chevrolet Impala, which is very sharp, but it didn’t win a Ward’s 10 Best Interiors trophy because the interior is less compelling than the beautifully sculpted sheet metal.

The same cannot be said of the refreshed Chrysler 300, which carries over many of the styling cues, inside and out, that have made it a perennial contender, while integrating a number of meaningful improvements.

The Chrysler 300 makes big sedans relevant once again and even tips its hat, by way of a nearly identical color scheme, to a high-end interior that dazzled us last year: the $122,895 Mercedes S-Class sedan.

The 300C Platinum rolled into our garage with a more palatable $51,175 price tag and, like the S-Class, parlays gorgeous satin metallic trim, quilted leather, excellent fit-and-finish and a first-rate human-machine interface that is easy to learn and simple to use.

With its latest Uconnect system, Fiat Chrysler makes what appears to be simple work of the HMI, which can be daunting because automakers need to incorporate so many functions within the central display screen to eliminate buttons from the instrument panel and center console.

But the 300 is much more than cool electronics. From the white-faced analog clock to the heated rear seats, the cabin is roomy, welcoming and luxurious.

“In a world overpopulated with giant SUVs, the Chrysler 300C Platinum reminds us how glorious big sedans can be,” writes WardsAuto editor Drew Winter.

“The ’15 model takes the award-winning interior of the previous version up another notch with even more features, comfort and sumptuous materials. It also has wonderfully practical details, such as stout grab handles and a truly sturdy sunglass holder,” Winter says.

For what it’s worth, Fiat Chrysler kinda owns the big-car segment. The 300’s platform mate, the refreshed Dodge Charger, is the only entry in the sector posting gains through the first three months, up 5% to 26,218 units, according to WardsAuto data.

The Charger is duking it out with the Impala for the No.1 sales slot, while deliveries of the 300 are flat. The Ford Taurus, overdue for redesign, brings up the rear; its sales are down 27.6% for the quarter.

Yes, the Charger also was in the competition this year, but we opted instead for the 300’s soothing, upscale persona.

“I could live in this car,” says one judge. And live well.

Read more at: http://wardsauto.com/vehicles-technology/chrysler-300-interior-bowls-over-competition

Renegade, 300 on Ward’s “Best Interior” list

Ward’s Auto has added the Jeep Renegade Limited to its “Ten Best Interiors List” for 2015.

The Renegade was one of two Chrysler-brand vehicles to make list: the other was the new Chrysler 300 Platinum.

Drew Winter, Editor-in-Chief of Ward’s Autoworld magazine, said:

“The interior checks off all our boxes in terms of being roomy, comfortable and having excellent ergonomics — even the voice-activation system works flawlessly. But, the attention given to interior details and design is truly spectacular for a vehicle in this class. Whimsical design elements, bold, contrasting colors and stunning metallic bronze trim convey a sense of fun and adventure that sets it apart. The Renegade isn’t a ’cute ute,’ it’s the Cherokee’s badass little brother.”

Ward’s Auto editors spent two months evaluating and judging 42 vehicles. Scoring was based on a wide variety of factors including fit-and-finish, comfort, material selection, ergonomics, information/displays, value, safety and overall design aesthetics.

At $33,205, the Renegade Limited was one of the least-expensive vehicles on the list. Only the Honda Fit EX-L had a lower sticker.

Last month, the editors of Kelley Blue Book‘s kbb.com said the Renegade was one of their “10 Favorite New-for-2015 Cars” and “10 Best All-Wheel-Drive Vehicles Under $25,000.”

Chrysler’s new top-level Platinum interior also received high praise from Winter:

“In a world overpopulated with giant SUVs, the Chrysler 300C Platinum reminds us how glorious big sedans can be. The ’15 model takes the superb interior of the previous version up another notch with even more features, comfort and sumptuous materials. The quilted leather trim and patterned upholstery are similar to what we see on German luxury sedans costing three times as much. The huge touchscreen and Uconnect infotainment system is about the best at any price. Yet it also has wonderfully practical details, such as stout grab handles and a truly sturdy sunglasses holder. ‘I could live in this car,’ says one judge. Yes indeed. And live well,”

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/04/renegade-300-on-wards-best-interior-list-28436

FCA’s lineup for New York show

While Fiat Chrysler will not be showing any new vehicles at the New York Auto Show, whose press days start tomorrow, the company will bring a wide range of cars and trucks for those who don’t travel the country to see unveilings as they happen.

The most controversial entry is the 2015 Ram Laramie Limited, first shown in Chicago, which Ram called “the benchmark in truck opulence.” From Detroit, Ram is showing the 2015 Ram Rebel, which includes a suspension lift, 33-inch tires, a custom interior, and the first non-crosshair grille in some time.

Alfa Romeo is showing off the 2015 Alfa Romeo 4C Spider, which follows the coupe version; it has absurdly low weight thanks to a carbon fiber monocoque chassis, allowing it to use a 1.75 liter turbocharged engine to from 0 to 60 mph in 4.1 seconds.

As one might expect, the new Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger, and Dodge Challenger will all be shown; each of these cars has a standard eight speed automatic (Challenger also has six-speed manuals for every V8). Among the Challengers will be the 392 Hemi Scat Pack Dodge Challenger Shaker, and both Hellcat Charger and Hellcat Challenger.

Fiat is showing the new 2016 Fiat 500X, a larger-than-500 hatchback, presumably along with the 500L, 500C, and 500.

The Jeep Renegade will be shown, and since it was on the off-road demonstration track in Chicago, we expect it to be in the New York track as well.

Mopar will spotlight four customized models; the Jeep Performance Parts-equipped Jeep Renegade makes the Trailhawk model more trail tough, the Sublime Green Dodge Challenger T/A Concept blends vintage design cues with Mopar parts, the Chrysler 200S Mopar shows a new body kit, and the Fiat 500L Custom has been, as the name indicates, customized.

We also expect Maserati to show off their full line, and Ferrari is bound to be present.

Camp Jeep will return to New York, with an 18-foot high Jeep Mountain and Trail Rated Pass three-wheeling demo. Other interactive rides include the 2015 Dodge Charger racing simulator; 2015 Ram Truck off-road simulator; and Chrysler brand’s “Beneath the Surface” 4-minute, 4D-immersive experience using the Oculus Rift DK2 headset, showcasing how the 2015 Chrysler 200 is made.

The New York Auto Show is held at the Javits Center, which is walking-distance from Penn Station, the midtown ferry, and the 42 bus line; the adventurous can also try to reach it by subway or the Port Authority bus terminal. Public show dates are April 3-12; the show opens every day at 10 am, and closes at 10 pm except on Sundays (7 pm). The cost is $16 anyone 13 and older, $7 for children under 13; there are discounts for adult groups of 20 or more, and for child groups of 10 or more. Annual public attendance is over one million, and the display area is now 950,000 square feet including the new Javits Center North.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/03/fcas-lineup-for-new-york-show-28245

2015 Chrysler 300 V-8

Quick! Name an American, rear-drive, V-8–powered, full-size sedan. If you said, “Chrysler 300,” you’re only 15 percent right, because that’s the proportion of 300 buyers who actually opt for the V-8. The rest decide that the V-6 will suffice, a strong indicator that while the model name may be rooted in a high-performance heritage, the car sells mostly on its styling, size, and value. All the same, the V-8 is key to the car’s image so that’s the version we sought out first—in both the 300C and sportier 300S trims—to sample on roads in and around Austin, Texas.

A decade after Ralph Gilles’s design for the 2005 model caused an industry sensation, the 300 has been revamped a second time, with new nose and tail treatments featuring redesigned lights and a 32-percent larger grille, a fresh interior, and an eight-speed automatic operated by a rotary dial on the console. The EPA combined fuel-economy rating goes up 1 mpg to 19 (16/25 mpg city/highway) with the new transmission, the quicker shifting of which Chrysler says will also improve performance even though the engine is unchanged.

The 300 got a thorough redo in 2011, but for 2015 it gets no new sheetmetal, unlike its platform-mate, the Dodge Charger. It does add another trim level, the 300C Platinum. The C, S, and C Platinum all offer the V-8 as an option but the engine is not available on the base Limited, adding a perhaps-unintended layer of meaning to that version’s name.

Checking the option box for the 5.7-liter V-8 costs $3000, which gets you not only the 363-hp Hemi, but also bigger brakes (with dual- rather than single-piston calipers up front and ventilated rather than solid rotors in back) and a 160-mph speedometer. The 300S also gains a decklid spoiler, while C and Platinum trim levels get the paddle shifters that come standard on any S. This year, the V-8 can no longer be paired with all-wheel drive, owing to that combo’s abysmal take rate; evidently, people who already commit $2500 extra for AWD are disinclined to throw another three grand at the lump under the hood.

DIAL A GEAR

Brand president and CEO Al Gardner’s marching orders for Chrysler are to square up more directly against the industry’s volume-sales leaders, including Ford, Chevrolet, and Toyota. As Chrysler’s flagship, the 300 still has some near-luxury pretensions, but the sharpened focus gives Dodge precedence as the “performance” brand. This goes some way toward explaining the lack of a U.S.-market SRT8 version. The SRT8 will survive in some foreign markets, but its price point exceeds (and its sales volumes fall far short of) Chrysler’s targets for North America.

A pity perhaps, but mainstream buyers in search of a V-8’s bellowing torque still have the 5.7-liter and its 394 lb-ft to lust after. New mechanical elements are the eight-speed gearbox, electric-assist power steering, and a retuned suspension using aluminum components. Aside from the rotary-dial gear selector much like the one on the Chrysler 200, prominent changes inside include a handsome new steering wheel, a new instrument cluster, and a redesigned center stack. There’s a good division of labor between the 8.4-inch UConnect touch screen and the button interfaces, although we grew frustrated by a radio we couldn’t turn off—the volume can be muted, but it repeatedly reactivated itself without our bidding. Also, the heated-seat controls are buried in the touch-screen menu rather than given dedicated buttons; partially offsetting that annoyance, a seat-heat icon appears on-screen when you first start the car, so you can avoid the irritation if you’re quick.

Supplementing that screen is a new 7.0-inch driver-information display nestled between the tach and speedometer. As long as you’re okay with the dial-a-gear setup, the controls are all easier to figure out and use than in the previous model, even with the added indicators and buttons for the new electronic driver aids, which include adaptive cruise control with full-stop ability, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist, forward-collision warning, and brake assist. These are contained in the SafetyTec 2 package, a $1695 option; SafetyTec 1, also at $1695 and required to get SafetyTec 2, brings parking assist, blind-spot and cross-traffic alerts, as well as forward-collision and adaptive cruise.

WHERE THE HEMI MEETS THE ROAD

The first V-8 we drove was a 300C optioned up to $47,170 with all the electronic assists, Touring suspension, and 20-inch wheels wearing 245/45 all-season performance tires. It’s a handsome car in the more traditional Detroit mold with plenty of chrome trim and, as configured, most of the driver-oriented hardware that comes on a 300S, excluding only that version’s tauter suspension. The 300C proved to be a comfortable, relaxed commuter through Austin’s dense urban traffic despite a bit of road noise from the performance-grade rubber; standard 18-inch wheels with touring-grade tires are a better choice for the comfort-seeker.

Once we got out into Texas Hill Country and the winding two-lane roads that make the region a driver’s delight, the latest 300 was eager to demonstrate that, like its predecessors, it can handle much better than you’d ever expect of a 4350-pound four-door. To get the best out of it, turn the gear selector to “S,” which delivers crisper shifts and allows the driver to take full control of the eight gears via the paddles—it lets you bump against the rev limiter rather than shifting itself at redline.

Our complaints of lazy shifting in previous 300s have been addressed, especially with the dial in S. Whether the driver calls for them or lets the transmission think for itself, gearchanges are crisp, taking only 250 microseconds, according to Chrysler, versus 400 for the previous model with its five-speed automatic. The only flaw is that Chrysler’s paddles are small, sharing back-of-the-wheel space with audio-system buttons, making it too easy to change radio stations rather than gears. There’s also a Sport button on the center stack that calls up more-aggressive programs for the throttle and steering response.

Speaking of the latter, Chrysler seems to have done its sums right with the electric-assist steering. You wouldn’t call it communicative, but at its worst the feel is as good as that delivered by the previous hydraulic unit, and sometimes it’s better as full electronic control allows for sharper reflexes when you’re going hard without imposing any burden in parking maneuvers. It’s also adjustable through three settings via the center screen.

PLENTY OF GOODS TO BACK UP THE GOODNESS

While the Platinum layers on more luxury, the driver’s choice remains the 300S with the V-8. Our test example had the 300S Premium Group option pack ($3295), including a dual-pane panoramic sunroof, navigation, the big UConnect screen, the SafetyTec 1 features, satellite radio, and so on. Other notable options included a $895 Light Group with self-leveling HID headlamps, SafetyTec 2, and a roof painted black to contrast with the Redline red paint ($1500). Not all of that is essential gear, so it’s clear you can get the driving goodness of the 300S without spending the full $46,275 on this car’s sticker. That’s worth considering because at that price, you’re head-to-head with the Chevrolet SS, which comes fully loaded at its base price and now offers your choice of manual or automatic transmission. Also important, the Chevy is several hundred pounds lighter and a better performer overall.

The Chevy might not interest those into the 300 look and the Hemi heritage, but the keen drivers for whom that car might be an option should know that the tighter suspension in the 300S is worth having—with it, the car took a quicker set into a corner and was less inclined to pitch or roll than was the otherwise similar 300C when the back roads took on the contours of a stormy sea. The 300S’s attendant blacked-out trim and unique grille texture are more matters of taste.

Chrysler kept reminding us that the 300 model name turns 60 years old in 2015, harking back to the original C-300 of 1955. Sixty years ago, its 300 (gross) horsepower was a bunch of power and the C-300 was a bunch of car. It was also an early exemplar of a car company mating luxury and style with performance.

Even with the SRT8 version gone, the 2015 model combines respectable performance, elegant styling, useful technology, and surprising agility at a reasonable price. If it’s the V-8 configuration you want, this may be the time to step up. When FCA finally gets around to a clean-sheet redesign—expected for 2018—the V-8 will probably be even more rare, and more expensive, than it is now.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-chrysler-300-v-8-first-drive-review

Quality Built into Each 2015 Chrysler 200

Quality is typically at top of mind for anyone looking to buy a new vehicle. Here are some of the ways Chrysler Group has made quality front and center in the development of its all-new 2015 Chrysler 200.

Before they are shipped to dealers, shiny new Chrysler 200 sedans pass through the Sterling Heights (Mich.) Assembly Plant’s (SHAP) newly-added Quality Assurance Center in the final step of the vehicle’s exhaustive quality process.

Randomly selected vehicles are scrutinized each day in the first-of-its-kind Quality Assurance Center, which conducts quality audits and detailed technical measurements on more than 400 vehicle functions (such as heating, cooling, emissions, fit-and-finish) and houses a material laboratory staffed with an on-site chemist.

“We’re confident the 2015 Chrysler 200 will make a strong first impression with customers,” Doug Betts, Senior Vice President—Quality, said. “The all-new sedan benefits from a significantly enhanced quality process at the plant that’s part of our commitment to World Class Manufacturing. Quality and customer satisfaction are part of everyone’s job.”

About one and a half years ago, team leaders at SHAP started analyzing and planning how they would build the all-new Chrysler 200. SHAP employees identified and implemented approximately 3,500 quality controls into the assembly process before the first customer vehicles were built.

“The goal is to design each workstation so it’s impossible to make a mistake,” Betts explained. “The best expert on how to error-proof a specific assembly job is the person who does it every day – that’s why it’s so important to have all workers engaged in World Class Manufacturing.”

While the primary objective is to prevent issues from occurring in the first place, the plant also increased the number of dedicated quality inspectors from 22 to 50 as an extra layer of protection for customers.

The all-new body and paint shops make SHAP one of the most versatile and flexible facilities within the Company, significantly enhancing the quality and consistency of each new car.
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A 2015 Chrysler 200 is measured and inspected in the Metrology Lab at the all-new Body Shop in Chrysler Group’s Sterling Heights (Mich.) Assembly Plant. (2014)

Like other Chrysler Group assembly plants, SHAP also constructed a state-of-the-art metrology center in preparation for the new vehicle launch. The metrology center is a high-tech laboratory with a clean room environment that allows engineers to find the root cause of any build variations – even when components appear perfect to the naked eye. The lab uses a complex set of fixtures, which mimic the body shop’s process, plus laser scanners and blue light fixtures to measure and create 3-D digital models. All of these tools are used to find and resolve any fit-and-finish issues before customer vehicles are built.

The attention to detail and quality controls at the plant represent the final steps in a quality process that begins with the inception of each vehicle program at Chrysler Group.

The Chrysler team conducts extensive research with current customers – and competitors’ customers – to set the vehicle targets for things such as performance, safety, fuel economy and quality.

This includes the company’s Perceived Quality Team that works with designers, engineers and suppliers to enhance the fit-and-finish, surface quality, material options and even the sound quality of moveable parts like doors and storage bins. Customers make judgments on a vehicle’s quality the first time they see and touch a car, whether it’s at an auto show, dealership or neighbor’s driveway; the Perceived Quality team is tasked with making sure customers receive a strong first impression on the quality of the 200.

In final preparations for the market launch, a development fleet of 200 sedans undergoes testing, day and night, on all kinds of road surfaces, at high and low altitudes and through blizzard conditions, as well as dry, desert heat. All that testing adds up to more than 17 million validation miles, including tests done in Chrysler labs, at the proving grounds and on public roads.

Some of the most punishing tests take place inside the Chrysler Technology Center on the Road Test Simulator (RTS). It recreates the abuse vehicles endure at the hands of a 95th percentile customer – meaning a customer who drives the vehicle in more severe conditions than 95 percent of all drivers. The RTS recreates a wide range of on-road and off-road driving surfaces and puts a lifetime of wear-and-tear on a vehicle in one month’s time.

Continually improving its test methods, the 200 is one of the first Chrysler Group vehicles to be evaluated on the newly built Lateral Load Test Track at the automaker’s Chelsea (Mich.) Proving Grounds. The Lateral Load Test Track recreates the type of suspension stresses that a vehicle gets after years of hard-driving on twisty roads that are more common in Europe. To validate the 200’s durability, development vehicles were run through the new track approximately 40,000 times, which simulates millions of rigorous miles and contributes to excellent long-term ride and handling characteristics.

Multimedia touchscreens and controls increasingly influence customers’ overall quality satisfaction. The award-winning Uconnect systems, available in the Chrysler 200, also receive thorough test drives as technicians work through an extensive checklist to validate the functionality and reliability of the system as well as how compatible it is with a wide variety of mobile phones, music players and other media devices.

The 2015 Chrysler 200 comes with a five-year/100,000 mile limited powertrain warranty and roadside assistance, in addition to three-year/36,000 mile bumper-to-bumper coverage.

As read on: http://www.chryslergroup360.com/featured_news/quality-built-into-each-2015-chrysler-200/

Dodge, Jeep, Ram pick up “Best Retained Value” Awards

The Dodge Challenger, Jeep Wrangler and Ram ProMaster van were among the vehicles with the “Best Retained Value,” according to Edmunds.com.

The awards recognize brands and models that have the highest projected residual value after five years.

“Chrysler Group is honored to accept these awards from Edmunds.com,” said Doug Betts, Senior Vice President for Quality. “Great resale value reflects the strengthening of our brands and the improvements in the customer satisfaction and quality for these award winning products.”

The Chrysler 300, Chrysler 200 Convertible, Ram 1500 and Chrysler Town & Country all received honorable mentions in their categories.

 

best retained value awards copy

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/06/dodge-jeep-ram-pick-up-best-retained-value-awards