Archive for the ‘fuel economy’ Tag

Dream Vacation or Nightmare Road Trip? Pre-Trip Vehicle Check Can Make the Difference

Road trip car trouble can be a real nightmare, but performing a pre-trip vehicle check helps drivers avoid a vacation breakdown disaster, says the Car Care Council.

“When dreaming about summer vacation, the thought of a roadside breakdown can be terrifying,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Performing a pre-trip driveway inspection gives motorists peace of mind by reducing the chance of unplanned, costly car trouble and providing an opportunity to have any repairs performed by a trusted technician before hitting the road.”

Right in their own driveway, motorists can determine how road ready their vehicle is with a 10-minute vehicle check. If service or repairs are needed, they can be performed in advance to ensure safety and reliability on the road.

Check the tires including tire pressure and tread. Underinflated tires reduce a vehicle’s fuel economy and uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.
Check the hoses and belts as they can become cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or show signs of excessive wear. These are critical to the proper functioning of the electrical system, air conditioning, power steering and the cooling system.
Check filters and fluids including engine oil, power steering and brake, and transmission, as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.
Check the wipers and lighting so that you can see and be seen. Check that all interior and exterior lighting is working properly and inspect and replace worn wiper blades so you can see clearly when driving during precipitation.
Check the brakes and battery to be sure the battery connection is clean, tight and corrosion-free and that the brakes are functioning properly.

The Car Care Council also recommends that motorists restock their emergency kit, consider a pre-trip tune-up to help the engine deliver the best balance of power and fuel economy, and order a free copy of the Car Care Council’s popular Car Care Guide for the glove box at http://www.carcare.org/car-care-guide.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/dream-vacation-or-nightmare-road-trip-pre-trip-vehicle-check-can-make-the-difference/

Is Your Car Ready for a Road Trip?

If you are planning a road trip this summer, it’s important to remember that you shouldn’t just put gas in your car and go, says the non-profit Car Care Council. A pre-trip vehicle check can determine how road-ready your vehicle is so you can take steps to have any problems fixed before heading out for vacation.

Before you hit the road, the Car Care Council recommends a vehicle check to help avoid the inconvenience, potential safety hazards and unplanned expense of breaking down miles away from home.

– Check filters and fluids, including engine oil, antifreeze/coolant, windshield washer and power steering, brake and transmission fluids. Dirty air filters can waste gas and cause the engine to lose power.

– Check the hoses and belts and replace if they become cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or show signs of excessive wear. These are critical to the proper functioning of the electrical system, air conditioning, power steering and the cooling system.

– Check the brake system and make sure the battery connection is clean, tight and corrosion-free.

– Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Under inflated tires reduce a vehicle’s fuel economy and uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.

– Check the engine to make sure it is delivering the best balance of power and fuel economy and produce the lowest level of emissions.

– Check that the gas cap is not damaged, loose or missing to prevent gas from spilling or evaporating.

“With summer vacation season upon us, a thorough inspection of your vehicle will give you peace of mind and help make your road journey safer,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Taking a few minutes to ‘be car care aware’ will make for a less stressful and more fun adventure.”

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide, which is now available electronically, or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2016/06/car-ready-road-trip/

Is Your Check Engine Light On? Don’t Ignore it.

One of the most vital signals of an improperly functioning vehicle is the check engine light and when illuminated, it alerts the driver to a variety of existing potential problems. Vehicle check-ups during community car care events throughout the country reveal that the check engine light is on in nearly one out of ten vehicles, says the Car Care Council.

“When the check engine light comes on, it means that a vehicle system, such as the ignition, fuel injection or emission control, is not operating properly, even if the vehicle appears to be running normally,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “A glowing check engine light doesn”t mean you have to immediately pull the car to the side of the road, but it does mean you should get the car checked out as soon as possible. Ignoring the warning light could result in costly repairs. At the very least, the light could alert you to an engine problem that is negatively impacting fuel economy.”

Some common malfunctions that can cause the check engine light to illuminate include a faulty oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor, or spark plugs and wires. If the light flashes, the condition is more critical and must be checked immediately to prevent severe damage, which may include catalytic converter damage.

When scheduling service, make sure the automotive shop that examines your vehicle has professional technicians who are trained and certified in OBDII diagnosis and repair. The technician will connect your vehicle”s computer system to a diagnostic scan tool, which will provide trouble codes indicating why the check engine light was activated.

While the diagnostic tool is connected, the technician can analyze data streams such as the idle speed, throttle response, engine temperature, fuel system pressure, manifold vacuum, exhaust emission levels and many other key indicators. Once the problem is fixed, the car”s computer is reset to initiate the computer’s release process. The technician should then advise the customer of the proper course of action, potential warranty coverage, further testing if necessary and recommended repairs.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2013/07/is-your-check-engine-light-on-dont-ignore-it/

First Look: 2016 Nissan Maxima

The Nissan Maxima has seen little change since the current generation debuted for the 2009 model year. Now, Nissan is introducing a next-generation model that promises better fuel economy, a more athletic road demeanor, and a driver-focused interior.

Nissan calls the new Maxima a “virtual clone” of the Sport Sedan Concept that came out in January, and although we don’t think the two models look exactly alike, we definitely see the inspiration. The 2016 Maxima features a V-Motion grille flanked by boomerang-style headlights with standard LED DRLs. Thanks to its blacked-out A-pillars, the Maxima adopts a floating roof appearance that creates a wraparound canopy. In back there are strong character lines and LED rear parking lights. Overall, the new Maxima is 1.3 inches lower and 2.2 inches longer than the seventh-generation Maxima.

Under the hood, look for a heartier 3.5-liter V-6 with 300 hp and 261 lb-ft of torque. This engine has been redesigned with more than 60 percent new parts and should help increase fuel economy for an unofficial target EPA rating of 22/30 mpg. A new Xtronic transmission with a wider gear ratio range and new shifting logic should improve acceleration from a start and while exiting a corner. Perhaps even more important is a completely new chassis that sheds 82 pounds from the previous model, helping to boost performance further.

The Maxima also benefits from a Drive Mode Selector that adjusts the ride experience to the driver’s command. In Sport mode, steering weight and throttle response increase, and new active sound enhancement amplifies the engine note to the driver’s ear. Normally, however, the new Maxima is supposed to run quietly thanks to laminated glass and active noise cancellation that drown out road Peek inside the cabin, and you’ll see a new ergonomically designed cockpit. The center stack is pointed 7 degrees toward the driver, and a floating console sits higher than in the old Maxima and puts important controls such as push-button start within easy reach. Padded materials give the Maxima a premium feel, and a flat-bottom steering wheel adds sporty appeal.

The 2016 Nissan Maxima will be available in five trims, including a new performance-oriented SR trim. Even the base Maxima S is well-equipped; it now comes standard with NissanConnect navigation and an 8-inch display. Other standard features include remote engine start via Intelligent Key, online search with Google, an eight-way power driver’s seat, a four-way power passenger’s seat, dual-zone climate control, HomeLink, and Sirius XM satellite radio. Stepping up to the SV nets leather-appointed seating, heated front seats, driver lumbar support, parking sensors, and more. The SL brings a dual panoramic moonroof, 11-speaker Bose sound system, and a number of safety features such as forward emergency braking, rear cross traffic alert, and blind-spot monitor.

The SR joins the upper trim levels. It brings a sport-tuned suspension, front chassis performance damper, Ascot leather seats with diamond-quilted Alcantara inserts, paddle shifters, aluminum sport pedals, and upgraded 19-inch wheels. At the top of the lineup sits the Platinum, which comes with driver memory, power tilting and telescoping steering column with easy access feature, Around View Monitor with moving object detection, mahogany wood-tone finish accents, and other premium extras. No optional packages are offered on the Maxima; instead, buyers can add accessories such as splash guards, spoilers, unique tires, and a few other extras.

The 2016 Nissan Maxima goes on sale this summer and starts at $33,235, including an $825 destination fee. This makes it more than $1,000 more expensive than the 2014 Maxima, which is expected given all the radical changes the new model has in store. In its new generation, the Maxima now has a chance to transform itself from an also-ran model to a uniquely athletic competitor in the large-sedan category.

Read more: http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/sedans/1504_2016_nissan_maxima_first_look/#ixzz3bRhz5vNB

Surprise: Using car’s air conditioning saves gas

Want to save fuel on those long summer highway drives? Don’t open the window. Crank up the air conditioning.

That’s just one of the useful — and frequently surprising — tips available from fueleconomy.gov , the go-to web site for information on fuel economy.

While running the AC does increase fuel consumption, it’s more efficient than driving with the windows open at highway speeds. The open windows increase the car’s aerodynamic drag, and that makes the engine work harder, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Other EPA-approved fuel-savers

– Park in the shade so your car doesn’t get as hot.

– Leave the windows open when you first start driving to clear hot air out of the cabin.

– If you’ve got a plug-in hybrid, pre-cool the car while it’s still plugged in. That uses power from the electric grid, not your car’s engine.

While air conditioning uses energy, drivers are more likely to be safe and focused on the road when they’re comfortable. Don’t stress yourself out by driving in a sweltering hot car.

If you want to know how much more money you spend when you speed up, the website can calculate that, too.

Driving a 2015 four-cylinder Toyota Camry at 80 miles per hour will cost $1.49 more per 100 miles than 70 mph for instance.

Read more at: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2015/05/25/gas-savings-epa/27884285/

Better Driving Habits Help Family Finances and the Environment

According to the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), motorists can help the environment and their own finances by incorporating a few good practices. Regular vehicle maintenance and better driving habits are two simple ways any car owner can go “green” — both for the environment and one’s own wallet.

Here are a few specific, easy-to-implement tips from ASE:

– Keep the engine running at its peak performance. A misfiring spark plug can reduce fuel efficiency as much as 30 percent. Replace filters and fluids as recommended in the manual. A well-tuned engine pollutes less and uses less. Moreover, neglected engine performance problems can cause costly repairs over time.

– If you do your own repairs, be a good steward of the environment. Dispose of engine fluids and batteries properly. A single quart of used motor oil can pollute thousands of gallons of water. Antifreeze poured on the ground can poison wildlife and household pets. Check around at local repair facilities to see if they accept used fluids and parts, or call your local government agencies for information on proper disposal and recycling.

– Keep tires properly inflated and aligned. If your air pressure is low, you force the engine to work harder and burn more gasoline. Tires that are misaligned also make your vehicle work harder. Consider, too, that poorly maintained tires wear out faster, which means more discards have to be scraped, recycled, or sent to the landfill.

– If weekend car tinkering is not your idea of fun, find a dependable ASE-certified technician. Ask friends for recommendations. Check the reputation of the repair shop with your local consumer group. Check out the technician’s specific credentials. ASE-certified auto technicians are tested for specific skills and knowledge in national exams, such as engine performance, brakes or suspension.

– Have your vehicle’s air conditioning system serviced only by a technician qualified to handle and recycle refrigerants. Older systems contain ozone-depleting chemicals, which could be released into the atmosphere through improper service. If you have used any over-the-counter remedies such as system sealants or self-service refrigerants, let the technician know prior to servicing the vehicle.

– Avoid speeding and sudden accelerations. Both habits guzzle gas and put extra wear-and-tear on your vehicle’s engine, transmission, steering and suspension system, and other components. Use cruise control and anticipate traffic patterns ahead. As a side benefit, your brakes will last longer, too.

– Consolidate daily errands to eliminate unnecessary driving. When waiting for friends or family, shut off the engine. Park in a central location at the shopping center, and walk from store to store, rather than drive from one end to the other.

– Remove excess items from the vehicle. Less weight means better mileage. Remove that roof-top luggage carrier after vacations to reduce air drag.

While there is no single vehicle that’s ideal for every lifestyle, regular car care and gentler driving lets you maximize gas mileage for your particular make and model — saving you money and helping the environment.

The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) was founded in 1972 as a nonprofit, independent organization dedicated to improving the quality of automotive service and repair through the voluntary testing and certification of automotive professionals. ASE-certified technicians wear blue and white ASE shoulder insignia and carry credentials listing their exact areas of certification. Their employers often display the ASE sign. Shops with a high percentage of ASE-certified technicians often participate in the Blue Seal of Excellence Recognition Program.

Read more at: http://www.ase.com/News-Events/Publications/Glove-Box-Tips/Better-Driving-Habits-Help-Family-Finances-and-the.aspx

6 Simple Car Care Tips to Increase Gas Mileage

Six Gas Saving Car Care TipsSpring is here and so are rising gas prices. Not to worry, says the Car Care Council. A few simple and inexpensive vehicle maintenance steps can stretch your dollar at the pump and go a long way toward protecting the environment.

“Many motorists don’t realize that fuel consumption is directly related to auto care and has a significant impact on how much gas you use,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Gas prices can climb quickly, but the good news is that you can fight back. By properly maintaining your vehicle, you can improve fuel economy while saving money.”

The non-profit Car Care Council encourages motorists to be car care aware and perform simple maintenance to improve fuel economy.

– Tune-Up: Keep your car properly tuned to improve gas mileage by an average of 4 percent.

– Tire Pressure: Keep tires properly inflated and improve gas mileage by up to 3.3 percent.

– Motor Oil: Improve gas mileage by 1 to 2 percent by using the grade of motor oil recommended by the manufacturer.

– Air Filters: Replacing clogged air filters on older vehicles can improve fuel economy and will improve performance and acceleration on all vehicles.

– Gas Cap: Damaged, loose or missing gas caps allow gas to vaporize into the air.

– Fix It: Addressing a serious maintenance problem, like a faulty oxygen sensor, can improve mileage by as much as 40 percent, according to http://www.fueleconomy.gov.

In addition to vehicle maintenance, modifying driving habits, such as observing the speed limit and avoiding quick stops and starts, can also increase fuel efficiency. Consolidating trips, avoiding excessive idling and removing unnecessary items from the trunk are also easy ways to lower fuel consumption.

April is National Car Care Month and free vehicle inspections are happening all around the country. Find a free car care clinic or vehicle inspection event near you on the Car Care Council’s Event Finder to learn more about taking care of your car.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2014/04/rising-gas-prices-dont-have-to-cost-you/

$2 Gas Is Back! Is That Good?

If you’ve been to a gas station in recent weeks, you know that fuel prices are low — crazy low. That seems like a good thing, but is it?

Yes and no.

According to AAA, today’s price for a gallon of unleaded regular averages $2.67. In some parts of the country, you can find it for $2.50, and even cheaper at discount stations. This time last month, the price was nearly 30 cents higher ($2.94), and a year ago, it was more than 75 cents higher ($3.27).

So, what’s the deal? There are a range of factors keeping fuel prices low, but two stick out:

1. We’re in the middle of “winter gas” season. “Winter gas” — technically, just “gas” — is easier to produce than “summer gas”, which is required by law to contain more additives so that it burns more cleanly and efficiently in hot weather. That makes winter gas comparatively cheap, but that’s just part of the explanation for today’s low fuel prices.

When refineries switch from one type of gas to the other, they scale back on the outgoing version to ensure that they can sell all of the inventory they have. Those slowdowns in production cause artificial shortages, which cause prices to spike — usually around May and September. Now, in December, we’re well into the cheaper winter gas season, and the summer gas changeover is a long way off, so prices are very low.

2. Oil production in the U.S. is booming. Thanks to new extraction techniques, the U.S. is experiencing a golden age of oil production. While we still depend on imported oil for some of our supply, the country now produces enough gas and diesel to be a net exporter.

That sounds like good news — and it is for some. For others, not so much.

WINNERS

Those who stand to benefit the most from low oil and gas prices are:

Consumers: As the U.S. economy continues to improve, inflation has begun creeping upward. Unfortunately, U.S. wages aren’t keeping pace, meaning that the money workers earn doesn’t go as far as it might. Low fuel prices give consumers a break, allowing them to focus their spending on food, mortgages, education, and the like. Some argue that cheap gas also slows auto sales by allowing owners of gas-guzzlers to keep their rides a bit longer, though there are people who disagree with that, including…

Makers of trucks and SUVs: Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, and other makers of pickup trucks and large SUVs are doing bang-up business these days. That’s in part because the truck-loving construction sector is humming along, but also because consumers aren’t put off by the lackluster fuel economy most pickups and SUVs earn. (Though it bears mentioning that more fuel-efficient, car-based crossovers are also selling like hotcakes.)

LOSERS

Not everyone is happy about cheap gas, though:

Oil-producing states and countries: States that depends on oil for their revenue — either from producing the stuff or refining it — now find themselves in a bind. Soon, they’re likely to be forced to make painful budget cuts, trimming funds for schools, hospitals, and other important community resources. Farther afield, in countries that derive most of their income from oil, the situation is much worse. If things don’t change, low oil prices could destabilize entire nations, leading to humanitarian crises, mass emigrations, and in extreme cases, terrorism.

Eco-advocates: Campaigns for reduced auto pollution and greenhouse gas emissions work best when gas prices are on the upswing. With fuel prices so low, there’s little incentive for consumers to shell out the extra dough needed to buy hybrids like the Toyota Prius, much less all-electric models like the Tesla Model S.

Automakers: The Environmental Protection Agency has set strict guidelines on fuel economy and auto emissions leading up to the year 2025, and automakers are working hard to create fleets that can meet those standards. All that new technology comes at a premium, though, and low fuel prices mean that customers may be more inclined to shell out for less fuel-efficient models while they can. (Then again, who knows?)

Mother Nature: Low fuel prices typically translate into upticks in travel, meaning greater auto emissions. That means more air pollution and more greenhouse gases, which at the very least make breathing more difficult and at worst, increase global warming.

WILL THESE PRICES STICK AROUND?

Like it or not, fuel prices aren’t likely to stay this low for long. Even if OPEC changes its mind and decides to scale back production, sending crude prices higher, we’ll soon reach the changeover to “summer gas”, which should cause prices at the pump to climb.

In other words: get now while the getting is good.

As read on: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1095806_2-gas-is-back-is-that-good/page-2

Nissan Group becomes No. 1 full-line manufacturer in EPA’s annual fuel economy review

– Nissan Group takes lead as most fuel efficient full-line automaker with largest year-over-year improvement among any automotive manufacturer

– Lightweight engineering strategy, improved aerodynamics and efficient transmissions drive fuel economy improvements

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Nissan Group is the most fuel efficient full-line automaker in the United States, according to the 2014 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Trends” Report. Nissan’s fleet-wide fuel economy rating of 26.2 combined1 mpg was highest among all full-line automakers in the annual report, which is the authoritative reference on new light-duty vehicle carbon dioxide emissions, fuel economy and powertrain technology trends in the United States.

Nissan’s 26.2 combined mpg rating, based on 2013 model-year Nissan and Infiniti vehicles, marks a 2.1 combined mpg (8.7 percent) improvement over 2012 model-year Nissan and Infiniti vehicles, the largest year-over-year gain among all manufacturers. The 26.2 combined mpg mark is 4.4 percent more efficient than the No. 2 spot and exceeds the full-line automaker industry average (manufacturers offering vehicles for sale in every product segment) of 23.3 combined mpg by 12.4 percent.

As a full-line automobile manufacturer, Nissan sells passenger cars, SUVs, CUVs, mid-size and full-size pickup trucks, compact and full-size vans, a taxi, vehicles with V-8 engines, a 545-horsepower supercar, luxury hybrid vehicles, and a zero-emissions plug-in battery electric vehicle – a range of products to meet consumer needs across the full spectrum of product segments.2

“Reaching this point is a direct result of a dedicated company-wide effort to scrutinize every aspect of each new model to extract the most fuel efficiency possible,” said Pierre Loing, vice president, Product Planning, Nissan North America. “Our engineers and designers have worked hard to get us here, and we look to continuously improve fuel efficiency of our models to face the challenges of future regulations while surpassing customer expectations.”

The realization of this accomplishment came in part due to the introduction of three all-new fuel-efficient models for the 2013 model year – Altima, Pathfinder and Sentra.  These models each brought a significant improvement in fuel efficiency to the marketplace compared to their predecessors. Average combined fuel economy for the 2013 Altima sedan improved 4 mpg or 14.8 percent. The most fuel-efficient 2013 Sentra model improved from 30 mpg to 34 mpg combined, or just over 13 percent compared to the model it replaced. The 2013 Pathfinder SUV saw the largest gains, with an almost 30-percent year-over-year improvement and a combined fuel economy of 22 mpg4.

Fuel economy improvements are attributed to several key engineering advancements such as reduced powertrain friction, improved aerodynamics and the use of efficient Xtronic transmissions. Nissan also employs an engineering lightweight strategy to all new models to significantly reduce vehicle curb weight – a key factor to improving fleet fuel economy. Nissan reduced the weight of the 2013 Nissan Pathfinder by 500 pounds, the 2013 Nissan Sentra by 150 pounds and 80 pounds for the 2013 Nissan Altima.

Nissan expects continued improvements in future model years. Next year’s report will include the Rogue, which was completely redesigned for model year 2014 and achieves a capable combined average of 28 mpg – 3 mpg better than the model it replaced5. The trend will continue with future models like the all-new 2015 Murano and next-generation Maxima, as well as the upcoming all-new Titan full-size pickup truck. Murano features an ultra-low, sports-car-like .31 coefficient of drag, lower curb weight and efficiency improvements in its powertrain. Maxima and Titan will also feature improved efficiency without compromise to the customer.

For more on Nissan’s fuel efficient vehicle line-up, visit NissanNews.com/FuelEconomy. To view the entire EPA Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Report, please visit http://www.epa.gov/fueleconomy/fetrends/1975-2014/420s14001.pdf.

Dodge announces Viper price cut

The 2015 Dodge Viper will have more horsepower, improved fuel economy and, perhaps best of all, a new starting price of $84,995, excluding destination charges and gas guzzler tax. The new sticker is $15,000 less than the 2014 model and is about the same as the original 1992 price of $50,700, adjusted for inflation.

The new Viper has 645 horsepower and gets up to 20 miles per gallon. Deliveries will begin in the first quarter of 2015.

In addition to lower pricing on the 2015 Viper, prices on all Vipers in dealer inventory have been discounted by $15,000. Current Generation 5 Viper owners will receive a $15,000 certificate that they can use toward the purchase of a new Dodge Viper. This is in addition to the $15,000 price reduction, so a buyer could save $30,000.

Viper sales have fallen dramatically from their pre-recession levels. Dodge reported 38 sales in August, down 37.7% from August 2013. The Chrysler supercar is still in the black for the year with sales up 15.0% to 438 units but there are an estimated 600 still on dealer lots.

Speaking to Automotive News’ Larry Vellequette, Dodge CEO Tim Kuniskis said, “I think the current car is so much better than any other Viper we’ve ever built, but we’ve got to fix the one last piece: We’ve got to fix the retail equation. We’ve got to fix what’s going on in the dealership, in the showroom. It’s the dealer network, it’s the inventory, it’s the pricing, it’s how we sell the car. We have to fix all of that.”

The Viper will now be marketed along with other Dodges and will be available from all Dodge dealers.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/09/dodge-announces-viper-price-cut