Archive for the ‘challenger srt’ Tag

What will be the next Hellcat?

The 707-horsepower Hellcat engine, a supercharged 6.2 liter Hemi V8, has rewarded Dodge with much higher sales than expected, along with a great deal of publicity in both magazines and social media.

The engine, carefully set up so that it can be run “all day” at the track on hot summer days — unlike at least one competitive Camaro — seems to be a real winner, but it’s available only in two cars, the closely related Challenger and Charger. In the Challenger, buyers can get a manual or automatic; in the Charger, it’s all automatic, but that automatic responds far more quickly than even a well-trained human can.

As Chrysler and its suppliers work to boost production of the Hellcat engine (particularly the unique supercharger), the next question becomes, “Which car is next?”

There are two real possibilities, both of which have been rumored: the Ram 1500 and the Jeep Grand Cherokee. The Jeep is the more credible choice, because the Grand Cherokee SRT has been a hit — and has been able to command a higher price than most FCA US cars. In addition, the suspension has already been tuned for performance with the 392 engine, which puts out 485 horsepower.

Jeep Grand Cherokee is a worldwide seller, and a Hellcat version would certainly be relatively popular in parts of the world where Rams are rare if available at all.

Ram, on the other hand, would be much harder to performance-tune; engineers would be starting from scratch, rather than building on work already done. Packaging might be easier, but would it sell more normal Rams, the way a Grand Cherokee Hellcat would sell more of the 6.4 SRTs?

All indicators, and our own long ears, are that the next Hellcat will be a Grand Cherokee. There’s no point in waiting for it to come out this year, though — demand for the hot engine means that it’ll be restricted to large cars for the moment, simply because orders exceed supply.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/07/what-will-be-the-next-hellcat-29268

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2015 Dodge Challenger SRT 392

I’ve just started reading the third installment in a planned five-book biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, Master of the Senate, written by the incomparable Robert Caro. Conveniently, a recent trip to drive the BMW X6 M and 228i Convertible was to be staged in Austin, TX, within easy driving distance of LBJ’s birthplace, Johnson City. And yes, the city is named for his family.

Having completed my duties with the Bimmers, I borrowed the spangled 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT 392 you see above, to squire me around the Texas capitol for a weekend, and as a lift out to the Hill Country homestead of our 36th President.

Johnson City isn’t exactly a road trip mecca, but there’s a pretty good brewery, a museum, the reconstructed LBJ house to take snapshots of, and it’s a nice drive to get out there if you’ve got a 485-horsepower muscle car at your disposal.

Driving Notes

– With the heroic Hellcat, this 392 and the R/T Scat Pack (that Brandon Turkus reviewed recently), there are more SRT-treated Challengers to choose from than ever before. There are 707 obvious reasons that the Hellkitty is the top dog (as it were), but there are important difference between this 392 and the Scat Pack, too. Both cars make use of the 6.4-liter Hemi V8 putting out 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque, but the 392 also gets an adaptive suspension, six-piston Brembo brake calipers (instead of four-piston), wider tires, leather and Alcantara seats, a heated steering wheel, a louder stereo and HID headlights.

– When LBJ was campaigning for his seat in the House of Representatives, he would’ve loved to have something as potent as this monster of a V8 under the hood of his canvassing car. The 6.4L snorts with authority before it sends the big coupe forward to just about any speed I’d ask of it, and with a quickness. Johnson was known for haranguing drivers to step on it, when all that stood between himself and a few more votes was the ability to fit one more stump speech into the day. The 392 feels as though it could cover a quarter of the state of Texas in a morning if you throttle down deep enough (faster even than the Johnson City Windmill, I’d guess).

– Though there’s a six-speed manual available, I’m actually quite fond of the eight-speed automatic in the 392. The two-pedal setup better suits the fast-cruiser attitude of the car, and it never served up any poorly conceived shift logic when I left it in D.

– Of course, the roads are better now than they were in the 1930s and 40s, too. Even on rather remote Farm to Market roads, the Challenger will grip and go around meandering corners, and turn in harder than you’d expect. This iteration of the Dodge doesn’t feel any more light on its feet than the others I’ve driven, but it’s capable of fast point-to-point driving once you start to trust the rubber and brakes (which are excellent), and get over the wideness of the track.

– Big guys like LBJ and myself have always fit well in the Challenger, and nothing about that changes with the 392. The seats are thick and well bolstered, with more than enough adjustment for me to find a comfortable position with good visibility. I even had four adults in the car for a few shorter drives around Austin, and only my extreme tallness would stop that from being a good idea for longer journeys.

– I haven’t spent as much time on the roadways of the Lone Star State as some of the other Autoblog editors have, but I think I can appreciate that this Dodge is a capable all-around sports car for country like this, if not a knife sharp one. What the Challenger lacks in things like steering response and feedback, it makes up for somewhat in ride quality and refinement. The 392 is even pretty quiet while at speed… unless you poke the thunder with a toe-tap of throttle.

Being honest, everything I like about the Challenger is present in every V8-powered version of the car (and a lot of it even in the base V6). But the 392 does add in enough specialness, enough potential for instant and thrilling drama, and a deep well of power to make it one of the best flavors SRT offers. And, at some $15k cheaper than the SRT Hellcat, it almost feels like a super-muscle car value. At $45,995 to start, it’s in the realm of affordability for a variant that you aren’t going to see in every other supermarket parking lot.

It may not be exactly Presidential in the total picture, but I think it’s a car that the fast-talking-Texan side of ol’ Landslide Lyndon would have truly appreciated. And it unquestionably makes for a great ride out to see his birthplace.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2015/03/09/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-392-quick-spin-review/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Auction Actually Raised $1.65M

he Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat that sold over the weekend actually raised more money for charity than first reported. . . a lot more!

After crossing the block at the Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas auction for an incredible $825,000, Dodge has announced that the Engelstad Family Foundation has matched the auction pricing bringing the total amount raised for charity to $1.65 million. With the generous donation, the grand total means the Challenger SRT Hellcat has raised more money for charity than any other car in Barrett-Jackson history. As icing on the cake, Barrett-Jackson waived all bidding and consignment fees so 100 percent of the sale price will go on to benefit Opportunity Village, a not-for-profit organization that serves people with significant intellectual disabilities in the Las Vegas area.

The winning bidder of the auction was none other than Rick Hendrick, owner of Hendrick Motorsports and several Chrysler Group dealerships. The auction package included a 6.2-liter supercharger engine cover and a HEMI Orange painted base presentation box with a VIN0001 electronic vehicle build book and a video documentary on an iPad Mini that shows the step-by-step build process of the car.

“The $1.65 million raised by auctioning this one-of-one Dodge Challenger Hellcat at this year’s Barrett-Jackson auction means the most powerful muscle car ever will also have a very powerful impact on the people who benefit from the services of Opportunity Village,” said Tim Kuniskis, President and CEO, Dodge and SRT Brands, Chrysler Group LLC. “The VIN0001 muscle car was not only one of the hottest cars that rolled through the Barrett-Jackson auction lanes, it is also the ultimate collectible 2015 Dodge Challenger as Dodge is ensuring there will never be another one like it.”

Read more at: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2014/09/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-auction-actually-raised-1-65m.html

The NEW 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Officially Unveiled

Dodge has officially unveiled the most powerful vehicle to ever wear the Challenger name – the SRT Hellcat – complete with over 600 horsepower courtesy of a supercharged, 6.2-liter Hemi V8. It will be offered alongside the 485-hp Challenger SRT.

The new, force-induced V8 isn’t just the most powerful ever fitted to the Challenger, it’s the most powerful eight-cylinder Chrysler Group has ever built. Power figures aren’t finalized, so expect to see “over 600 hp” bandied about quite a lot. That fury will be channeled through either a six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic. Yes, over 600 ponies through an eight-speed auto. So far, the only vehicle we know of that delivers more output through that many gears is the as-yet untested Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Sadly, we don’t have performance metrics just yet, although if this thing can’t crack four seconds to 60 miles per hour, we’ll be pretty surprised.

As is the theme nowadays, the 2015 Challenger SRT features a number of driving modes, governing power output, shift speeds for the 8AT, steering effort, traction control settings and suspension settings. There are three pre-programmed options – Default, Sport and Track – and a Custom mode that allows drivers to mix and match to their heart’s content.

Like the Ford Mustang Boss 302, the SRT Hellcat will arrive with two keys, one red and one black. The red key is the one we want, as it unlocks the car’s full potential, while the black key is more or less a valet key, limiting output of that supercharged beast under the hood.

Both the SRT Hellcat and the lesser SRT model will ride on unique 20-inch alloys. An eight-spoke design, wrapped in either Goodyear Eagle RSA2 all-seasons or Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar tires, will be offered on the naturally aspirated model. The Hellcat and Track Pack-equipped SRT will get wider 20s and Y-plus-rated Pirelli PZero Nero tires. Corralling the SRT Hellcat’s 600 ponies will be the task of a set of 15.4-inch, two-piece Brembo brakes with six-piston calipers.

Finally, the SRT Hellcat’s extra oomph certainly demands some aesthetic tweaks. On the exterior, a Viper-like hood scoop dominates the head-on appearance of the 600-hp Challenger. That functional scoop is flanked by an equally functional set of air extractors, while the new vertical-split grille is a styling item borrowed from the 1971 Challenger. And in case all this visual aggression isn’t enough, Dodge has added a very, very conspicuous “SUPERCHARGED” badge to the Challenger Hellcat’s fenders.

Production of the most powerful Challenger will kick off during the third quarter of 2014 at Chrysler’s Brampton, Ontario factory. Expect pricing information to be released closer to launch. Take a look below for a video and the full press release on both the Challenger SRT and SRT Hellcat, and then hop up top for a gallery of images of the new tire-shredder.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2014/05/20/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-official/