Archive for the ‘jeep 4×4’ Tag

Off-Road Guide

With a few guidelines and some good old-fashioned common sense, almost anyone can drive off-road in a Jeep 4×4 vehicle. Jeep 4×4 vehicles are Trail Rated, which means they can handle most obstacles you encounter.

BE PREPARED:
Always check your vehicle before going off-road. Make sure your battery is fastened, all hoses are in good condition and oil and fluids are topped off, including fuel. Also be sure that all four tires are in good condition and have the proper tire pressure. Avoid travelling alone, especially into unfamiliar territory.

BE ON THE LOOKOUT:
Once off-road, put your vehicle in 4WD whenever you anticipate a situation that will demand the additional traction. It’s difficult to engage 4WD after you get stuck. You’ll also want to get into the habit of looking over your hood, scanning left to right so you can clearly see what you’re approaching on the trail. If you’re just watching the left tire, there’s a good chance you’ll get the right tire in trouble. Avoid putting your head outside the vehicle to see what’s coming (that’s what Wrangler’s folding windshield is for). Also, many trail masters recommend keeping your thumbs up and out of the way of the steering wheel spokes in rough terrain. For example, if your tire suddenly falls off a rock, your steering wheel could quickly rotate and catch your thumb with a spoke — ouch! Generally, vehicles with power steering, like all Jeep vehicles, lessen the chance of sudden steering wheel rotation.

TAKE IT EASY:
Speed and power are not required in rough off-road driving. In low-range 4WD, the low gearing and low speed of Jeep 4×4 vehicles at idle will generally pull you over obstacles. In many cases, with manual transmissions, letting the clutch out slowly and allowing the vehicle to crawl over obstacles in the lowest gear is the best scenario. As a matter of fact, on the Rubicon Trail, the average speed is a mere 1-5 miles per hour.

SNOW AND MUD:
Generally, when snow or mud is present on the driving surface, it is the right time to engage your on-demand or part-time 4WD system. If you have an all-time system like Quadra-Trac I, there is no input required from you. In heavy snow, when pulling a load, or for additional control at slower speeds, shift the transmission to a low gear and shift the transfer case to 4WD-LOW if necessary (Quadra-Trac I and Quadra-Trac SRT do not offer a low range). Don’t shift to a lower gear than necessary to maintain momentum. Over-revving the engine can spin the wheels and traction will be lost. If you begin to lose traction in snow or mud, turn your steering wheel back and forth rapidly. This will generally help the wheels bite into fresh terrain and pull you through. If traction is lost, STOP. Wheel spinning will just dig you in deeper. The key is to maintain forward momentum.

SAND:
For better traction in sand, drop air pressure 10-12 pounds below normal pressure on conventional tires. (Return to normal pressure after use in these conditions.) Try high-range 4WD to maintain forward momentum. Depending on the condition of the sand, low-range 4WD and alternative gear selections may be necessary. Also try to make wider turns if at all possible. Tight turning slows the vehicle abruptly and can get you stuck. Again, maintaining forward momentum is key.

HILLS:
When climbing hills ALWAYS go straight up or down. It’s also smart to know what’s on the other side before going up. At the base of the hill you should apply more power. Ease up on the power as you approach the top and before going over the crest. If you stall on the ascent, back straight down the hill in reverse. For downhill travel, always use the lowest gear with a manual transmission. When descending a hill in low-range, do not disengage the clutch and allow the vehicle to coast. Severe damage to your clutch disc may result. Allow the gears and engine compression to slow you down, using the brakes only to fine-tune your speed. If equipped with an automatic transmission, use low-range and the lowest drive setting.
NOTE: NEVER drive up a hill at an angle. If the hill is very steep and you don’t feel confident that you or your vehicle can make it up, don’t attempt it. Never get sideways on a steep slope as this can lead to vehicle instability. Off-roading1 can be very challenging. Remember, go as slow as possible. Use common sense with safety being the foremost concern.

ROCK CRAWLING:
We call it “crawling” for a reason. Use a low gear and low-range 4WD and just let the vehicle crawl and idle (with as little throttle as needed) when going over obstacles like rocks or logs. Never straddle rocks. A vehicle with 10 inches of ground clearance will not go over a 12-inch rock! Maneuver the tire on top of the rocks and crawl over them slowly. If you hear scraping, don’t panic. Your Jeep® 4×4 vehicle’s skid plates and rock rails (this equipment varies depending on what Jeep 4×4 vehicle and packages have been purchased or leased) will take the brunt of the beating. Dropping tire pressure 3-5 pounds improves traction and helps avoid tire punctures. (Return to normal pressure after use in these conditions.) Remember, the ideal speed for rock crawling is 1-3 miles per hour.

TREAD LIGHTLY:
Leave it better than you found it. Observe posted signs and stay on trails and recreation areas approved for off-roading. Use your good judgment in protecting the beauty and solitude of the area. Don’t leave anything behind and, better yet, pick up and remove any trash that others have discarded. And if the terrain looks especially fragile, take an alternate route. For more information on how to Tread Lightly, visit treadlightly.org. Leave it better than you found it.

Read more at: http://www.jeep.com/en/4×4/off-road-guide/#cta-Overview-Copy_1*

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Jeep reveals its most capable and luxurious Grand Cherokees

Jeep has flashed some serious off-road muscle in both Moab and New York this month. While the bright lights and polished floors of the Jacob Javits Center don’t make for quite as dramatic a Jeep reveal backdrop as the red cliffs and towers of Moab, that’s where folks will find the biggest Jeep debuts right now. The new 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk wears a raft of upgrades that make it the “most capable factory-produced Grand Cherokee ever,” while the Jeep Summit debuts as the most luxurious.

Jeep shows the new 2017 Grand Cherokee Summit at the 2016 New York International Auto Show Jeep grows the Grand Cherokee family Jeep grows the Grand Cherokee family in NY Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit debut
Moab’s Easter Jeep Safari isn’t just notable to this story because it shares some of the New York Auto Show’s dates once again this year, but because it was the birthplace of the official Trailhawk trim, with the Grand Cherokee serving as the launch vehicle. The Trailhawk name existed at Jeep for a while, and was used on an open-top, Wrangler-based 2007 concept car, but it really gained steam at the 46th Annual Jeep Safari in 2012. Jeep’s annual slate of Safari concept models that year included the Grand Cherokee Trailhawk Concept.

Quite simple by Jeep Safari concept standards (especially compared to the Mighty FC also revealed that year), the 2012 Trailhawk concept was a look at a Grand Cherokee with elevated off-road readiness. It included Mopar rock rails, 18-in Goodyear off-road tires, and red, mineral gray and black accents throughout.

It wasn’t nearly as radical or lust-worthy as other Jeep Safari concepts then and since, but the modest Trailhawk package was one of the more production-ready designs to come out of the annual Safari gathering. Jeep experimented with a short-lived production Grand Cherokee Trailhawk in model year 2013, then gave the “Trailhawk” a hard launch as the most capable of the four model options on the 2014 Cherokee redux. It followed up with a Renegade Trailhawk.

“Our Cherokee and Renegade Trailhawk models are among our fastest selling and most sought-after models, and we are following that successful formula to provide consumers even more legendary Jeep 4×4 capability for Grand Cherokee,” explains Jeep chief Mike Manley.

The newest Trailhawk follows the original Grand Cherokee Trailhawk concept closely, sliding a set of burlier off-road-ready standard equipment under and around the driver. That equipment includes Jeep’s Quadra-Drive II 4×4 system with rear electronic limited slip differential (ELSD), a tweaked, Trailhawk-spec version of the Grand Cherokee’s Quadra-Lift air suspension, 18-in Goodyear Adventure off-road tires (20-in Adventures available optionally), skid plates and an anti-glare hood decal. Jeep says that the model has up to 10.8 in of ground clearance.

Of course, many folks aren’t happy just knowing they have the most capable Grand Cherokee in the showroom – they want others to know, too. The new Trailhawk has a variety of distinct visual cues, including front and rear Trailhawk red tow hooks, a front fascia lifted from the 75th Anniversary Grand Cherokee, Trailhawk and Trail Rated badges, and gray accents on the mirror housings and roof rack. Mopar rock rails are available optionally.

The black Trailhawk interior includes leather and suede performance seats, red contrast stitching, a Trailhawk-badged steering wheel, and brushed piano black and gun metal-finish accents. The standard 8.4-in Uconnect infotainment system includes off-road-specific readings of things like wheel articulation, suspension height, and Selec-Terrain mode.

The Trailhawk will arrive in showrooms late this summer (Northern Hemisphere) in a variety of colors and with the full slate of Grand Cherokee engine options (minus the SRT 6.4-liter V8). Pricing has not yet been released, but for reference, the 2016 Cherokee Trailhawk is priced US$7,600 more than the Cherokee base Sport 4×2 trim and the Renegade Trailhawk is $8,750 more than the Renegade Sport 4×2 trim.

Rounding out the six-model 2017 Jeep lineup is the all-new Jeep Summit, also introduced in New York. If the Trailhawk is the brutish dirt rat of the Grand Cherokee family, the Summit is the posh urbanite. Jeep calls this one its most luxurious full-size SUV, and premium features like the full-wrap Laguna leather interior, 19-speaker, 825-watt Harman Kardon audio system, acoustic windshield and side glass, lighted door sill, headlamp washers and auto-folding power mirrors make it so.

Like the Trailhawk, the Summit tackles the ground ahead with help from the Quadra-Drive II 4×4 system with ELSD. It also comes standard with Quadra-Lift air suspension, Selec-Speed Control and driver assistance features like adaptive cruise control, blind spot detection, forward collision warning, lane departure warning, and parallel/perpendicular park assist. The exterior includes an updated front fascia, LED fog lamps and new 20-in polished aluminum wheels.

The Summit will roll out during the same late summer timeframe as the Trailhawk.

As read on: http://www.gizmag.com/2017-jeep-grand-cherokee-trailhawk/42488/

Dick Scott’s Jeep Adventure Grand Opening

Attention Jeep Lovers, the Grand Opening of Dick Scott’s Jeep Adventure Off-Road Jeep Track is happening tomorrow, Saturday, August 22nd, from jeep-adventure12pm until 5pm. Bring your Trail-Rated Jeep out to Dick Scott Motor Mall for a Test Ride! Don’t have a Trail-Rated Jeep? No problem, Test Ride one of OURS!  Grand Grillin will be there cooking up free food and refreshments with a LIVE Radio feed throughout the afternoon hosted by David “Mad Dog” DeMarco of The Game 730am. We will also have a lot of great Give-A-Ways including Dick Scott Gift Cards, Jeep hats and t-shirts and much more…

Dick Scott’s Jeep Adventure test track is open to the public during our normal business hours. If there’s no one out at the track when you arrive, just head into the showroom and let us know you are ready to ride! Visit our website or click here to view our first-of-many GoPro videos of a test ride!

 

Announcing the Motor Mall Recreational Jeep Track!

We are excited to announce that we have broken ground on our Recreational Jeep Track at Dick Scott Motor Mall in Fowlerville, Michigan! We will have rocks, logs, obstacles, hills and more!

Visit our blog and our Facebook and Instagram account to watch for updates on our progress and our official Grand Opening Announcement!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outfitting for Off-roading: Introduction

If you’ve never been off-roading in your Jeep brand vehicle, it’s time to pull out your calendar and mark a date. There’s no better time than summer to take an adventure outside of your everyday life and experience what it truly means to have a Trail Rated vehicle.

The Jeep Blog is starting a series here at the Jeep Blog called “Outfitting for Off-roading” in order to help you out with some of the ins and outs of prepping to hit the trails. So check back as we post some of there tips and tricks on our blog! Learn more about adventuring through various terrains and read suggestions on how to customize your Jeep brand vehicle with Mopar accessories in order to take on every trail headfirst.

To get you started, below is a list of off-roading terms you’re going to need to know as you’re preparing to hit the trails.

Articulation – Articulation happens when one or more wheels are elevated and others are planted on the ground. This helps your Jeep brand vehicle drive over rocks and other objects you may encounter on the trail while maintaining stability.

Crawl Ratio – Your Jeep brand vehicle’s crawl ratio is what allows it to climb steep inclines or take on taller rocks. It allows your vehicle to slowly maneuver up and over your obstacle without you having to use the accelerator.

Ground Clearance – Ground clearance refers to the height of objects your vehicle can take on without causing any damage to the underside of your vehicle.

Low-range – The low-range feature on your Jeep brand vehicle helps you to add additional traction when needed.

Traction – Traction is what helps keep your Jeep brand vehicle from sliding on slippery or wet surfaces. It helps you maintain control of the vehicle, particularly when driving in rain, snow and mud.

As read on: https://blog.jeep.com/adventures/outfitting-off-roading-intro/