Archive for the ‘Rubicon’ Tag

Command the Trail in the 2016 Wrangler

When you think of the all-American SUV, the Jeep Wrangler is bound to make the short list. No trail is too tough, and with so many ways to configure the exterior, you’re bound to stand out from the crowd. Better yet, with tons of exciting features, every drive is better than the next. To get your hands on the 2016 Jeep Wrangler for sale visit Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in Plymouth or Dick Scott Motor Mall in Fowlerville.

The 2016 Jeep Wrangler is Trail Rated® tough, and that is made clear once you have a seat inside. Start the engine, and the Pentastar® V6 powertrain kicks to life as it produces best-in-class 285 horsepower, as well as 260 lb.-ft. of torque. It not only has a powerful performance, it’s efficient too with a fuel rating of 17/21 MPG city/hwy. The Wrangler can be paired with one of two 4×4 systems. Your first option is the Command-Trac® 4×4 system, perfect for four-wheel off-roading power. With equal power to all four wheels, you’ll have best-in-class winter performance, which is sure to come in handy when I-275 is coated with snow. When you choose the Rock-Trac® 4×4 system you’ll have best-in-class off-road performance with a 4:1 low-gear ratio, so you can crawl at lower speeds. And to ensure safe trail exploring, the Wrangler has Hill Descent Control and Hill Start Assist.

There’s no denying that the 2016 Jeep Wrangler is one of the most noticeable vehicles out on the road today – which is pretty impressive when you take into consideration how many ways the exterior can be configured. For instance, remove the tops and doors for a more open-air feel, and even choose from one of the four options for the top: no top, soft top, Freedom Top® hardtop, and color top. Other exciting exterior features include the full-size spare tire, fog lamps and heated power side mirrors for visibility no matter the weather, and available side steps for easy entry and exit.

Have a seat inside, and you’ll quickly realize this isn’t your average SUV. In fact, the 2016 Wrangler has the most comfortable interior in its class. Choose upholstery in premium sedosa cloth or available McKinley leather trim to support you on your daily commute, and with available heated front seats, the long winter months won’t seem so bad. When you’re loading all your camp gear inside, take advantage of the fold-and-tumble seats. Leave them in place for 12.8 cubic ft. of cargo space, or fold them flat for 56.5 cubic ft. of storage room. And if you bring a little dirt from the camp site with you on the way home, the Wrangler is standard with a durable and washable interior that features drain plugs for easy cleaning.

Depending on the trim level, the Jeep Wrangler has one of three entertainment systems. Radio 130 comes with a CD player, MP3 capability, and AM/FM radio. Upgrade to Radio 130S, and you’ll now have a 1-year subscription to SiriusXM® Satellite Radio. The top-of-the-line Radio 430N adds on a 6.5-inch touchscreen, Garmin® GPS Navigation with SiriusXM® Travel Link, and a USB port. And to experience best-in-class audio, the 9-speaker Alpine® premium all-weather sound system plays your favorite song with crystal clear clarity.

To conquer the trail, day-to-day errands, and everything in between, get behind the wheel of the 2016 Jeep Wrangler for sale in Plymouth, MI, here at Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram and in Fowlerville, MI, at Dick Scott Motor Mall. We are open six days a week, with convenient evening and weekend hours, so it’s always a good time to see what the Wrangler brings to the table.

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Jeep Compass mysteries

New mysteries are appearing around the next Jeep Compass, which one source claimed would be produced in Toluca, Mexico, rather than its home of Belvidere, Illinois.

Another source said that, rather than being a CUSW car like the new Cherokee, it would be based on the Jeep Renegade. This is on the same platform as the Fiat 500X, which allowed Fiat to put in more engineering time for both vehicles — but many changes were made to allow Renegade Trailhawk to have the torsional rigidity and clearance needed for the Jeep nameplate.

Either body could be justified as a choice, and in both cases, Jeep was able to overcome many of the problems of using a car platform for off-road use. Renegade did disappoint many by not laying a claim to crossing the Rubicon trail, or Chrysler’s replication of it; Compass might or might not be able to do this. Cherokee has, according to both official and unofficial sources, passed this bar.

The new Compass, regardless of underpinnings, is expected to be a four cylinder only vehicle, most likely with a nine-speed automatic in the United States, and Grand Cherokee-like styling (echoing the current model, shown above). We believe it will use the 2.0 liter Hurricane engine, most likely as an option, along with the current 2.4 four-cylinder. For markets outside the United States, the usual insanely wide range of Fiat engines is expected — Brazilian engines based on the old Neon 2.0, MultiJet diesels, and the 1.4 and 1.4 turbo Fiat gasoline motors.

At this time, Allpar has no firm indication of Compass’ platform or factory location. The launch appears to be around two years away.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/12/jeep-compass-mysteries

Outfitting for Off-roading: Introduction

If you’ve never been off-roading in your Jeep brand vehicle, it’s time to pull out your calendar and mark a date. There’s no better time than summer to take an adventure outside of your everyday life and experience what it truly means to have a Trail Rated vehicle.

The Jeep Blog is starting a series here at the Jeep Blog called “Outfitting for Off-roading” in order to help you out with some of the ins and outs of prepping to hit the trails. So check back as we post some of there tips and tricks on our blog! Learn more about adventuring through various terrains and read suggestions on how to customize your Jeep brand vehicle with Mopar accessories in order to take on every trail headfirst.

To get you started, below is a list of off-roading terms you’re going to need to know as you’re preparing to hit the trails.

Articulation – Articulation happens when one or more wheels are elevated and others are planted on the ground. This helps your Jeep brand vehicle drive over rocks and other objects you may encounter on the trail while maintaining stability.

Crawl Ratio – Your Jeep brand vehicle’s crawl ratio is what allows it to climb steep inclines or take on taller rocks. It allows your vehicle to slowly maneuver up and over your obstacle without you having to use the accelerator.

Ground Clearance – Ground clearance refers to the height of objects your vehicle can take on without causing any damage to the underside of your vehicle.

Low-range – The low-range feature on your Jeep brand vehicle helps you to add additional traction when needed.

Traction – Traction is what helps keep your Jeep brand vehicle from sliding on slippery or wet surfaces. It helps you maintain control of the vehicle, particularly when driving in rain, snow and mud.

As read on: https://blog.jeep.com/adventures/outfitting-off-roading-intro/

Jeep will hire up to 1,000 for part-time work

Chrysler Group LLC plans to hire up to 1,000 part-time employees for the Toledo Assembly complex to keep production rolling while giving regular employees the chance for a break.

“Our people have been working a tremendous amount of hours,” Plant Manager Chuck Padden said. “To get them more time off is important to us, to make sure they’re refreshed, and can work safely.”

With record demand for the Jeep Wrangler and the launch of the new Jeep Cherokee last year, employees are regularly working 60 hours a week. And while employees generally like the extra pay that results from working overtime, such lengthy stretches can wear on workers, he said.

A company spokesman said Monday that Chrysler has hired 380 temporary part-time employees this year, though 50 have been converted to regular, full-time employees.

Chrysler has collected applications for the jobs and is not currently accepting any more. Officials are in the process of conducting assessment testing and expect more employees to be brought on in the coming weeks.

Most of the new hires will get between 10 and 30 hours per week.

“It can vary, depending upon on the teams they’re on. Typically it’s a Friday-Saturday-Monday situation,” Mr. Padden said. “So if we’re scheduled for six days, TPT [temporary part-time] could be here three of them. Some of them might only work one day a week.”

The TPT employees are paid $15.78 an hour, the same rate as new full-time hires. They’re also offered limited benefits, including health insurance.

How long the new temporary part-time jobs last depends mostly on demand for the two vehicles built there.

While it isn’t unusual for automakers to use part-time help to ease the burden at busy plants, it’s not typically done to this level. Officials from the company and the union both said it’s an innovative solution that will boost production, allow weary workers more time off, and bring new employees into the plant.

Bruce Baumhower, president of United Auto Workers Local 12, said the help should take some of the load off employees who have worked long hours for a long time.

“They’ve worked through the Christmas shutdown the last couple years; they’ve worked through summer shutdowns. Summertime’s coming; they’ve got kids in Little League and other things,” he said. “They’ve done an unbelievable job of carrying the load.”

Mark Epley, UAW Local 12’s Jeep Unit Chairman and one of the key people in brokering the deal, said it’s important to get employees a little time off.

“You’ve gotta remember, these people are working 10 hours a day, six days a week,” he said.

The contract currently gives employees the right to take off a Saturday after working consecutive Saturdays. With the addition of part-time workers, employees will be able to take off other days as well.

“It’s very important to have the day off you want with your family,” he said.

The added help will allow the plant to run the Wrangler line every Saturday, which they haven’t been able to do. That’s important to Chrysler, which is trying to squeeze even more Wrangler production out of the plant this year after a record year in 2013.

That task falls on Mr. Padden, who took over as plant manager on Jan. 1.

Mr. Padden, 54, has been with Chrysler since 1995 and is on his third tour in Toledo. He most recently served as the launch manager for the Cherokee, then took over the top position in the plant following former plant manager Zach Leroux’s promotion to head of assembly operations for Chrysler.

“We’ve got a lot of good things going for us right now,” Mr. Padden said. “As the volume is picking up we’ll be one of the largest manufacturing sites in North America. We won’t talk specifics on the numbers, but we’ll be one of the largest manufacturing sites in North America with the two [lines] going at full tilt.”

Mr. Padden said Chrysler’s goal for the plant is to build 2,000 vehicles a day. Currently, employees at the Toledo Assembly complex build about 840 Wranglers and 990 Cherokees a day. Mr. Padden said the Cherokee line should reach full capacity in the year’s third quarter.

Right now the focus for Cherokee is on fine-tuning the build process and ramping up work on building international models. Jeep officials have said they plan to eventually sell the Cherokee in 150 countries.

“Every country has its own unique specifications they want to see. Everything from the way VIN stamps are put into a car to the way to the dashboard reads and the way the radio reads,” Mr. Padden said.

Chrysler expects about 15 percent of Cherokees built in Toledo to be destined for international markets.

Mr. Padden praised the work force in Toledo and its good working relationship with the company. He also understands Jeep’s importance to the city.

“It’s not just another company out there. We’re so integrated into the community of Toledo,” he said. “We recognize the interdependence of Jeep to Toledo. Continuing to work together, we hope to be here for a long, long time.”

Read more at http://www.toledoblade.com/Automotive/2014/03/11/Jeep-will-hire-up-to-1-000-for-part-time-work-Copy.html

Behind the Wrangler Willys Wheeler

When Jeep launched the Wrangler Willys Wheeler, an Allpar reader suggested that they should have made it based on the Rubicon instead of the entry-level Sport; while there was some suggestion that the new special edition was another “decal package.”

A couple of readers suggested it would have been more helpful to swap the fenders and fender flares with narrower ones, to help the vehicle reduce its width and fit on more trails and between more obstacles. Tannon Weber wrote, “The WWII military model, Willys CJ-2a and other early Jeeps didn’t have the plastic flares at all, just the flat fenders the same width as the body behind.  A model ostensibly paying specific homage to these early models needs to reflect some of the characteristics of those models, and replacing bolt-on parts should be a fairly cost-effective way to do so.”

Former Jeep engineer Bob Sheaves, however, pointed out that the Willys may have been more carefully thought out than it seems:

The Willys was a bare bones machine that could do its job with the hard parts and wasn’t a fancy SUV. That is what is being done here….it isn’t a Rubicon, with all the fancy doodads like sway-bar disconnects. This is an honest attempt to build a more off-road ready Jeep without the cost of a Rubicon.

The Rubicon is a better off-road vehicle, but the Willys is better off-road than a basic Sport.

The original “Willys” name was stamped into the hood, and the special edition has a plain black decal to keep common hoods across the models. The 4WD decal was originally done with a stencil to save money. The new decals match the original intent exactly. [Using stencils or stamping the name into the hood would be far more expensive.]

Give credit where credit is due….they done good on this one.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2013/11/behind-the-wrangler-willys-wheeler