Summer Driving Tips

During the hot summer months, it is important to remember to make sure vehicles are properly equipped with roadside emergency supplies to help keep families safe this summer. Before logging all those miles on your family road trip this summer, remember to:

Beat the Heat: Inspect the radiator, pressure cap, belts, and hoses to make sure they are in good shape with no signs of blisters, cracks, or cuts in the rubber.

Hydrate Your Vehicle: Check fluid levels: brake, automatic transmission, power steering, windshield washer and coolant. Make sure each reservoir is full and if you see any sign of fluid leakage, take your vehicle in to be serviced.
Arms of a driver steering a car

Before any longer trip, any time of year, remember to give your vehicle a check-up:

– Check the air pressure in all tires, including the spare,
– Make sure the wiper blades are functioning properly,
– Check battery life and inspect batteries and battery cables,
– Inspect brake pads and linings for wear; change the oil and filter according to manufacturer’s service interval specifications, and
– Test the headlights, brake lights, turn signals, emergency flashers and interior lights

Move the beach gear over for the roadside emergency kit. Even if you’ve prepared your vehicle for summer travel, it never hurts to have a ‘just in case’ kit in your trunk. Your emergency kit should include:

– Jumper cables
– Flashlight
– Emergency flat tire repair and/or spare tire
– Gloves, blankets and towels
– Hazard triangle, road flares, brightly colored distress sign, or ‘Help’ or ‘Call Police’ flag
– Screwdrivers and wrenches
– First aid kit
– Cell phone and charger
– Water for both the car radiator and your family
– High-calorie, non-perishable food

Traveling with kids?

– Always use proper safety restraints for all occupants
– Use the long drive as teaching moments about safe driving
– Pack a cooler with healthy snacks like water, fruit, nuts and granola
– Stop every few hours to let the kids stretch their legs
– Adults should take the time to exit the vehicle and stretch too. If you become drowsy, don’t hesitate to pull over to a safe location and rest until you feel able to continue the drive
Use electronic devices to help keep away the boredom on the long drives, as long as its not distracting to the driver

Make sure to check and stock trunk supplies twice a year and remember never leave on a road trip with your vehicle’s ‘check engine light’ or ‘malfunction indicator light’ lit up. If you take these precautions, you and your vehicle might be happier on the roads this summer. And don’t forget to have fun!

Read more at: https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/safety/summer-driving-tips

Enter today for your chance to win a 2017 Chrysler 300

In honor of Joanne Lindsay’s memory, the Dick Scott family has donated the brand new Chrysler 300 to the Ted Lindsay Foundation to be raffled off. The drawing will take place at The 17th Annual Ted Lindsay Foundation Celebrity Golf Outing being held on Monday, September 11, 2017 at Detroit Golf Club. Each raffle ticket is $99.00 and all proceeds will go directly to the Ted Lindsay Foundation efforts.

 

To purchase your ticket or for more information Click Here!

 

Auto Care Steps for a Stress Free Road Trip

Summer road trip season is here. Taking proactive steps to make sure your vehicle is operating properly will help avoid the hassle and unexpected cost of a breakdown away from home, says the non-profit Car Care Council.

This summer, AAA expects to receive calls from over seven million stranded motorists experiencing car trouble. The majority of issues the travel group anticipates will cause car problems, such as dead batteries and flat tires, can be prevented with a pre-trip vehicle inspection.

“Summer heat can take a toll on a vehicle, especially if it hasn’t been properly maintained,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Whether you do it yourself or visit a trusted professional technician, a pre-trip vehicle check will give you peace of mind and provide the opportunity to make any necessary repairs before you hit the highway.”

AAA also reports that four out of 10 drivers are unprepared for vehicle breakdowns. So you and your vehicle are ready for the road, the Car Care Council recommends taking the following auto care steps before you leave home.

– Check the battery and replace if necessary. Be sure the electrical system is charging at the correct rate; overcharging can damage a battery as quickly as undercharging. Excessive heat and overcharging shortens the life of a battery.


– Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.


– Check the HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) system as proper cooling performance is critical for interior comfort.


– Check all fluids, including engine oil, power steering, brake and transmission as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.


– Check the wipers and lightingso that you can see and be seen. Check that all interior and exterior lighting is working properly and replace worn wiper blades so you can see clearly when driving during precipitation.


– Check the emergency kit and restock, if necessary. Be sure to fully charge cell phones before leaving home.

The Car Care Council also recommends inspecting the brake system and performing a tune-up to help the engine deliver the best balance of power and fuel economy.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For the latest car care news, visit the council’s online media room at http://media.carcare.org. To order a free copy of the popular Car Care Guide, visit the council’s consumer education website at http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/auto-care-steps-stress-free-road-trip/

Ram 2500 Limited 143rd Derby Special Edition Truck

Louisville, KY was full of horsepower this past weekend. Ram Trucks was the official truck of the 143rd Kentucky Derby® on May 6th at Churchill Downs®. Ram Trucks entered its eighth consecutive year as the exclusive automotive partner to the races.

To celebrate Ram Truck’s continuing tradition with Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby, the trainer of the winning horse, Todd Pletcher, was rewarded a one-of-a-kind special 143rd Derby edition Ram 2500 Limited truck. The special truck is in Brilliant Black and includes blue Kentucky Derby 143rd logos on the left and right rear panels and a hand-painted Kentucky Derby rose badge on the grille.

The races began on Friday, May 5, and were opened by the Kentucky Oaks Survivors Parade. The parade is a march of breast and ovarian cancer survivors and supporters. Those who attended the races, as well as fans at home, had the opportunity to check out Ram Truck’s Pink-wrapped Ram 3500 Limited dually leading the march. The Ram ProMaster® and the Ram ProMaster City® were the official transport of the traditional garlands for each day’s winning horses.

From Ram Trucks badges on the jockeys themselves to onsite truck displays, Ram Trucks had a strong presence both onsite and during the on-air broadcast.

Ram Trucks surely dominated the field this past weekend at Churchill Downs.

Read more at: https://blog.ramtrucks.com/lifestyle/events/ram-2500-limited-143rd-derby-special-edition-truck/

A Little Auto Care Goes a Long Way

Performing simple preventative maintenance on your vehicle will go a long way toward protecting your vehicle investment, says the non-profit Car Care Council.

“Buying a new car today comes with a hefty price tag when you add up the down payment, monthly car payments and higher insurance rates. Neglecting its care can mean even higher costs down the line in the form of more extensive repairs and lost resale value,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “By following a proactive auto care plan, the typical car should deliver at least 200,000 miles of safe, dependable, efficient and enjoyable performance.”

National Car Care Month in April is the perfect time of year to give your car some extra attention. The Car Care Coun

cil recommends following a vehicle service schedule, keeping a free copy of the council’s Car Care Guide in the glovebox and performing the most common routine maintenance procedures to keep your vehicle performing at its best.

– Check all fluids, including engine oil, power steering, brake and transmission as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.


– Check the brake system annually and have the brake linings, rotors and drums inspected at each oil change.


– Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.


– Check the hoses and belts to make sure they are not cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or showing signs of excessive wear.


– Check the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system as proper heating and cooling performance is critical for interior comfort and safety reasons, such as defrosting.


– Check the wipers and lighting so that you can see and be seen. Check that all interior and exterior lighting is working properly and replace worn wiper blades so you can see clearly when driving during precipitation.

“Be sure to fully inspect your vehicle annually, including performing a tune-up and wheel alignment,” continued White. “If you ever suspect there is a problem, it’s a good idea to address it quickly before minor repairs become more complicated, expensive repairs.”

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For the latest car care news, visit the council’s online media room at http://media.carcare.org. To order a free copy of the popular Car Care Guide, visit the council’s consumer education website at http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/little-auto-care-goes-long-way/

What You Need to Know When Buying New Tires

Buying new tires ranks pretty far down on the list of things most people want to do with their time and money, right next to replacing a failed water heater. While you might overspend on your next water heater, at least there will be a flow of warm water to wash the pain away.

Not so with tires. A poor choice of replacement rubber will haunt you every driving day for the next three to six years. The wrong tires will pound your neck, assault you with constant whining, cause your beloved sporty car to handle worse than a pickup, or scare you witless when it rains. Plus, buying new rubber is intimidating for the unprepared: Tires appear identical. Each manufacturer claims all its tires are superlative in every area. All cost more than you’d budgeted, which was “nothing.” And newer vehicles require replacement components for their tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS).

But this process doesn’t have to be so painful. These are our simple tips to make the tire-buying experience a little better.

If You Were Happy With Your Old Tires

If you like the way your car performs, the answer is easy: Buy the exact same model you had. There’s a good reason—the tire and car companies spend nearly $1 million to develop a tire with the attributes that make you like your car. The original equipment tire was selected to highlight the vehicle’s good features and, often, smooth over weaknesses. If you’re satisfied with your car, go with tires that exactly match the original equipment tires. Tell the counter person that close isn’t good enough.

If your complaint is that your vehicle lacks traction in the rain, especially in deep water, think back to when the car was new. Did it handle well in the rain back then? If so, your problem is probably low tread depth, which means you don’t need different tires, just new ones.

(Not sure whether it’s time to replace the tires? There’s no consensus among car- and tiremakers on acceptable tire life, but keep a close eye on tires that have been on a vehicle, used as a spare, or stored in a hot or sunny location for more than six years. For a tire’s “born on” date, check the sidewall for an alphanumeric series that begins with “DOT.” The last four digits are the week and year the tire was made: “1209” means the tire was built in the 12th week of 2009.)

When you try to replace your tires with the same model that came on the car, you might run into sticker shock—original equipment tires can be expensive. However, carmakers offer every vehicle with at least two brands of tires. Some Web surfing will reveal the alternate brand. Keep in mind, though, that tires developed for a different trim level of your vehicle likely will be very different from those on your model. The tires for the sporty edition will ride harsher and have little traction in snow. If you want to save money by putting tires from the base model on your sporty version, they may make it handle like, well, the base model.

You’ll also need to take tire life into account. If you drive a sporty car, 20,000 miles is about all you can expect. Short tire longevity is one of the prices you pay for driving a vehicle with power and handling once reserved for full-on race cars. Today, even conservative cars, crossovers, and sport utility vehicles boast horsepower once unmatched by ultrahigh-performance cars. In addition, safety, comfort, and entertainment features have added hundreds of pounds to the average vehicle. Unleashing those extra horses—and stopping and turning all that weight—takes its toll on tires.

If your original equipment tires are not available, both online tire stores and the tire manufacturer will suggest reasonable facsimiles. They will not duplicate your experience exactly, but simply having new tires, much like a fresh hair style, will likely overcome the differences.

If You Want Something New

There’s hope for those who are unhappy with the way their car rides or handles. The trend of large-diameter wheels and low-profile tires has many accidental performance buyers complaining about ride comfort. A switch from ultrahigh-performance tires to those labeled “grand touring” or “touring” might soften the ride a bit. Check the consumer reviews at online tire sellers. Know that the change unavoidably will make handling less precise and reduce grip.

It’s easier if you want more performance from your car: Switch from the original all-season tires to summer ones (or, as they should be called, three-season tires). They’ll provide a lot more grip, wet or dry, at the expense of a harsher ride and no traction in the snow.

The most important rule: Do your research before you show up. Your trip to the tire store will be far less intimidating if you first assess your situation and budget, and then spend an evening surfing the sites of tire manufacturers, online tire sellers, and especially your local tire store.

Read more at: http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/a11849/what-you-need-to-know-when-buying-new-tires-9451125/

10 Essential Items to Keep in Your Car Emergency Kit

You never know when a car emergency kit will come in handy. And that’s exactly why clever car owners never drive without one. Here are ten essential items that belong inside your vehicle.

First Aid Kit

Even something as small as a paper cut can become a big nuisance in the car. That’s why first aid kits are an important tool. Standard ones usually contain band aids, gauze pads, disinfectant, medical tape among other basic items.
Flashlight and batteries

If you find yourself in a roadside dilemma at night, a simple flashlight can make any task infinitely easier.

Reflective Triangles

If you’re pulled over to the side of the road to fix a flat tire, it can be a dangerous undertaking, especially during times of low visibility. Reflective triangles help alert oncoming traffic to your presence.

Jumper cables

Make sure your jumper cables have heavy-duty clamps and are between an 8 and 6 gauge to handle enough power. And they should be at least 16 feet in length to make it easy to connect cars if you’re unable to park close together.

Tire Pressure Gauge

When changing a flat tire, it’s always smart to check the tire pressure on your spare. Although most cars come with a jack, test to ensure that yours is fully functional.

Bottle of Water and Nonperishable Food

In case of emergency, you might be hungry and/or thirsty. Keep snacks that won’t go bad in the event you’re waiting indefinitely for roadside assistance.

Shovel

While a windshield snow and ice scraper is great, sometimes you need a shovel to literally dig yourself out of a bad situation.

Winter Clothing/Rain Gear

Maybe it wasn’t snowing when you left the house but started just in time for your car to breakdown. Have a hat, scarf, rain gear and a pair of gloves in case you find yourself braving the elements during a roadside emergency. You never know when circumstances will force you outdoors.

Fire Extinguisher

Because car fires don’t usually go out on their own, make sure a fire extinguisher is always on hand. It should be rated to combat the two leading types of vehicle fires, Class B and C. The former concerns blazes caused by flammables like fuel grades. While the latter covers more severe fires related to electrical equipment.

Survival Tools

What falls into this rather broad category? Easy. Stuff like duct tape and a utility knife. Either tool can solve many a vehicular problem.

Ram Trucks Get Colorful at the New York Auto Show

Ram Trucks put its power on full display at the New York Auto Show, and created extra buzz by showing off a bit of color. New colors showcased in the Big Apple included the Ram 1500 Sport Sublime Green and the Ram 1500 Rebel in Blue Streak.

Ram 1500 Sport Sublime Green

The limited-edition Ram 1500 Sport Sublime Green rumbled into New York with its 5.7L HEMI® V8 that delivers 395 horsepower and 410 lb-ft of torque, paired with the TorqueFlite® 8-speed automatic transmission. And talk about unique — with just over 2,000 in production, this Ram Sport stands apart from and ahead of the crowd.


 

Features include a sport performance hood with black hood decal, deluxe cloth high-back sport bucket seating, Sublime Green body-color grille with bright billets, interior trim with Sublime Green accent stitching and black anodized spears and trim rings, and black Ram’s head tailgate badge and bodyside exterior badging.

 



 

The Ram Sport Sublime Green is available in Crew Cab, 4×2 or available 4×4, with 20-inch black semi-gloss aluminum wheels standard on 4×4, 22-inch polished aluminum wheels standard on 4×2, and for the first time ever, 22-inch black semi-gloss wheels available on 4×2.

   
Ram 1500 Rebel in Blue Streak

The rugged attitude of the Ram 1500 Rebel added a touch of New York swagger in the form of a new available color: Blue Streak. This new color will be available on 4×2 and 4×4 models, and in monotone or two-tone. In keeping with the bold, aggressive styling of the Ram 1500 Rebel, the new color comes with a black interior, and can be paired with the available Black Rebel Group.

Read more at: https://blog.ramtrucks.com/features/new-release-ram-1500/

Car Care: The Key to a Long-Lasting Vehicle

Basic car care is the key to a long-lasting vehicle, improving its safety and dependability, says the Car Care Council.

“Neglected vehicle care almost always means much higher costs down the line in the form of more extensive repairs or lost resale value,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Following a routine maintenance program makes financial sense, extending useful vehicle life and helping avoid costly repairs down the road.”

The Car Care Council recommends 10 basic maintenance procedures to keep your car operating at its best for the long haul:

– Check all fluids, including engine oil, power steering, brake and transmission as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.

– Check the hoses and belts to make sure they are not cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or showing signs of excessive wear.

– Check the battery and replace if necessary. Make sure the connection is clean, tight and corrosion-free.

– Check the brake system annually and have the brake linings, rotors and drums inspected at each oil change.

– Inspect the exhaust system for leaks, damage and broken supports or hangers if there is an unusual noise. Exhaust leaks can be dangerous and must be corrected without delay.

– Schedule a tune-up to help the engine deliver the best balance of power and fuel economy and produce the lowest level of emissions.

– Check the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system as proper heating and cooling performance is critical for interior comfort and for safety reasons such as defrosting.

– Inspect the steering and suspension system annually including shock absorbers, struts and chassis parts such as ball joints, tie rod ends and other related components.

– Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.

– Check the wipers and lighting so that you can see and be seen. Check that all interior and exterior lighting is working properly and replace worn wiper blades so you can see clearly when driving during precipitation.

In celebration of National Car Care Month, the non-profit Car Care Council has introduced a new custom service schedule. The personalized schedule and e-mail reminder service is a free resource to help motorists drive smart, save money and make informed decisions.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/car-care-the-key-to-a-long-lasting-vehicle/

A Clean Car is Money in the Bank

Purchasing a new car is a major financial investment. Keeping it clean is an easy and inexpensive way to protect its resale and trade-in value, says the non-profit Car Care Council.

“Many motorists procrastinate when it comes to cleaning their vehicles,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Whether you do it yourself or have it cleaned professionally, proactively keeping your car clean on the outside, and tidy on the inside, will pay big dividends when it comes to maintaining your vehicle’s value over time.”

The Car Care Council suggests five simple steps to keep a vehicle clean, helping protect it from the elements and preserve its value.

– Declutter – Start the cleaning process by removing excess clutter from inside the car as it can be distracting and hazardous, especially when debris finds its way near the gas and brake pedals. Don’t forget to clear out items that have accumulated in the trunk as they can add extra weight and reduce fuel efficiency.
– Clean the Interior – The next step is to thoroughly clean the interior, wash the windows, and clean and install floor mats. Be sure to vacuum on a regular basis. A clean and orderly interior allows you spot issues in the cabin so you can get them repaired before they get worse.
– Wash the Exterior – Give your car a good wash from top to bottom using products specifically made for automobiles. Always clean the tires and wheels before washing the body, and don’t use the same washing mitt or cloth for both.
– Wax Twice a Year – Waxing not only protects a vehicle’s finish, but it also makes subsequent washing easier. Before proceeding, make sure there are no foreign particles on the paint. It is important to note that waxing should be done in the shade, not direct sunlight.
– Fix Chips – If you find minor paint damage, cover the paint chips as quickly as possible to prevent further damage. For a quick fix until you can get paint touchup supplies, dab a little clear nail polish on the scratch.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For the latest car care news, visit the council’s online media room at http://media.carcare.org. To order a free copy of the popular Car Care Guide, visit the council’s consumer education website at http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/clean-car-money-bank/