Archive for the ‘wrangler’ Tag

2018 Jeep Wrangler spy shots

A couple weeks ago, we got a fairly comprehensive set of 2018 Jeep Wrangler spy shots. For fans of the JK-series Jeeps, it was all good news: the basic Wrangler Unlimited formula and shape is present and accounted for, meaning this new Wrangler will be an evolution of the current SUV, rather than a ground-up reimagining.

wrangler-unltd-rd16-kgp-ed-2Picture Courtesy of http://www.autoblog.com

 

The new shots give us some more detail than we had previously, and let us point out some JL Wrangler features that reaffirm FCA’s conservative approach. First of all, the heavy camouflage doesn’t manage to fully cover the exposed door hinges, just like in the current model, so those are a safe bet for the production version. The raked-back windshield might lose its ability to fold down, we’ve heard. The JL remains a body-on-frame truck with a solid front axle, evidenced by the front diff peeking out and the radius arms connected to them.

The large exterior mirrors also appear to be carryover items, and the taillights look indistinguishable from the current JK. We expect the front fascia to remain clearly recognizable as a Wrangler, but don’t be surprised if the headlight and sidemarkers incorporate some LED elements as a nod to current trends.

Remember, the JL will spawn a pickup version, and will slim down for better fuel economy with some aluminum elements, likely incorporated in the body. We expect the Pentastar V6 to carry over, but be joined by a diesel and a mild hybrid at some point in the future. It’ll be built alongside its JK predecessor for a short time in Toledo, Ohio.

Read more at: http://www.autoblog.com/2016/05/18/2018-jeep-wrangler-unlimited-spy-photos-best-look-yet/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

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Jeep’s next Wrangler will come in hybrid and diesel versions

Jeep has big changes in store for the next generation of the iconic Wrangler. Confirming a recent rumor, Fiat-Chrysler boss Sergio Marchionne recently announced the Wrangler lineup will be expanded with hybrid and diesel powertrains after the new model goes on sale.

Currently, the Wrangler is only offered with gasoline engines in the United States, but buyers in Europe can order it with a 2.8-liter four-cylinder turbodiesel mill that makes 197 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque. Marchionne stopped short of providing technical details, but Car & Driver speculates the four-banger won’t make the trip over the Atlantic. Instead, the Wrangler could receive the 240-horsepower 3.0-liter V6 unit that’s offered at an extra cost on the Ram 1500 pickup.

Jeep’s official business plan reveals the Wrangler will get a mild hybrid system, which indicates it won’t be capable of driving on electricity alone. Again, technical details aren’t available, but we hear that the hybrid powertrain will also be fitted to other members of the Fiat-Chrysler family including the next Ram 1500 truck.

More efficient engines are only part of the equation. Sources close to Jeep have repeatedly suggested that the next generation of the Wrangler will weigh considerably less than the current model (pictured) because it will be built largely out of lightweight materials such as high-strength steel and aluminum. The car maker hasn’t confirmed or denied the rumors, and all we know for sure at this point is that production will again take place in Toledo, Ohio.

The next generation of the Jeep Wrangler is tentatively scheduled to land in showrooms in 2017, meaning it will likely be presented at a major auto show either late this year or early next year. The diesel-burning engine is expected to arrive some time between 2018 and 2022, and the hybrid model won’t join the lineup until 2023 or 2024. In other words, if you want a gasoline-electric off-roader you’ll have to either be very, very patient or build it yourself.

Read more at: http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/jeep-wrangler-diesel-news-specs-rumors-performance/

2018 Jeep Wrangler: Still steel, still capable after all these years

The next generation of the iconic off-roader will be the 2018 Jeep Wrangler “JL,” debuting in 2017, followed after about a year by a pickup. Buyers can expect eight-speed automatics and hopefully six-speed manuals; gasoline Jeeps will get the second-generation eight-speed made by Chrysler (850RE), while diesels will get the “pure” ZF 8HP75.

IRS

Jeep reportedly tried an independent suspension for Wrangler, based on the 1963 Jeep Wagoneer or the Ram 4×4, but Larry Vellequette of Automotive News wrote on February 15, 2015, that they would stick with floating solid axles (one insider said they would change the configuration somewhat). This will help Mopar and the aftermarket to keep selling modifications, and make it easier to keep the ground clearance high.

The Wrangler was allegedly to switch to an aluminum tub and use a tough hydroformed steel frame, but then, in May 2015, Sergio Marchionne said, I think we can do almost as well without doing it all-aluminum.” The Wrangler will likely follow Ram in using a strong hydroformed frame.

Changing the basic design of the top of the Wrangler could save even more weight. Cars without tops, such as convertibles and roadsters, need heavy bolstering, and the Wrangler is built to withstand abuse. This and possible new safety rules may have led engineers to replace the “safety bar” with stronger tubes over the top and reduce lower-body reinforcement. Weight remains the biggest factor in city mileage. Jeep could then also do a fixed-roof version with relatively little re-engineering and retooling.

An Allpar source claimed, “The traditional soft top is gone, [replaced by] removable soft panels over the substructure. The sport bar design is gone. It even appears to have built in grab handles.” This would be consistent with Bob Sheaves’ predictions. He also wrote, “The taillight design will change (my guess with an “x” design, such as the one used in the Renegade), and bumpers, tailgate construction, and the 5×5 wheel bolt pattern are mostly the same as the current ones.”

This does not necessarily mean there will be no soft top, no removable doors, or even no fold-down windshield, though the latter may be difficult to justify. Indeed, another Allpar source reported that there would now be four roof setups: hard + soft (over the front), non-removable hard, an update of the current Freedom Top™, and a complete soft top.

The Jeep Wrangler is a key vehicle for Chrysler, the “ring that controls all Jeeps,” and Sergio Marchionne has said many times they cannot reduce its off-road capability. Whether this means they will actually not reduce its capability remains to be seen.

The appearance of the Wrangler is not likely to change much, other the “roof replacement” structure, and aerodynamic improvements may be brought about mostly by changes in the windshield angle, side mirrors, and underbody covers.

Diesel engines, pickup trucks, and other changes

Many expect Jeep to finally issue a U.S. diesel version of the Wrangler, and a limited production pickup version (Gladiator? Comanche?).

A diesel could still provide a serious boost in both city and highway fuel efficiency while pleasing hard-core off-roaders (thanks to its low-end torque), and it’s likely that the company will attempt to do a light-hybrid version a year or two after the main launch.

Standard American engines would likely be a V6 — by then, upgraded with more power and efficiency — and possibly the upcoming Hurricane Four. Europe will continue to get a diesel.

Most expect Jeep to make the Wrangler more aerodynamic, with a slightly larger slant to the windshield. The fold-down windshield may be dropped; it is unique for Jeep in North America, but few seem to care about it. Removable doors are likely to remain.

New axles

Allpar sources generally agree that there will be a new Dana axle, with a larger bolt pattern (going from 10 to 12); the Dana 44 bolt pattern did not change even when they increased the ring gear size and pinion for the current JK. The 44 has been used for many years, and advances in the state of the art may have led to a major upgrade for economy and off-road performance alike.

Flip-up rear window

A new patent application shows a unique full folding back glass design. The Jeep Wrangler is used for the illustrations.

The current Wrangler has a tailgate/spare tire that swing sideways, then the backglass can open upwards. The patent application is different in that the backglass folds all of the way up to the roof, with clips built into the roof so it can be pinned down and left all the way open. There are clips inside, to hold the struts after they are disconnected from the backglass (so it can reach the roof).

full-folding-backglass-3a

Driving with rear glass open could cause exhaust fumes in the cabin, and can also draw in mud when used off-road. Still, there are people who would like to be able to keep the backglass of their Jeep Wrangler open while driving with the top on, so the next generation Wrangler may include this as an optional package. It could also just be a patent to cover research and development on something that will never get used.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/SUVs/jeep/wrangler/2017.html

Wrangler: “best resale value”

The Jeep Wrangler has won Kelley Blue Books’s 2016 Best Resale Value award in the Small Crossover/SUV segment. Kelley’s analysts expect Wrangler to keep more of their value over five years than any competitors, including numerous Asian entries.

The Wrangler also came in at number five on KBB’s Top Ten list, with an estimated resale value of 66% of its original price after three years, and 55% at five years.

KBB wrote, “You could count on one hand the number of new vehicles that actually thrive by doing things the same way for decades, and the Jeep Wrangler is one of them. In fact, it could be the poster child for such an exclusive set… the Wrangler’s core mission hasn’t deviated far from that of its World War II-era ancestors: to affordably go where others can not.”

They pointed to its relatively low pricing, starting at $25,000. “No matter which Wrangler you choose, it will make you smile — even when it’s time to sell.”

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/12/wrangler-wins-best-resale-value-award-30797

Nissan Juke Vs. Jeep Renegade: Compare Cars

Believe it or not, the Jeep Renegade and Nissan Juke are in the same category of small SUVs. But they could hardly be more different. The Renegade is Jeep’s littlest SUV, with square-cut styling and genuine off-road prowess. The Juke, on the other hand, is a style-first urban warrior whose all-wheel-drive option is more for on-road traction than anything even in the neighborhood of rocky trails or mountain climbing.

New in 2015, the Renegade is the first vehicle developed from the ground up for global sale by the combined Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. While it’ll likely sell well in North America, its minimal dimensions make it best-suited to bring the Jeep brand to more crowded and less affluent markets in Europe, Asia, and South America. Its design is every inch classic SUV, with oversize lights and other details for visual interest.
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The interior is straightforward, modern, and contains a number of Jeep-brand reminders in the form of “Easter Egg” design elements. The Renegade’s front seats are comfortable, but there’s not that much room in the rear unless rear-seat riders bargain aggressively with those in the front. The seats are comfortable and nicely bolstered, and the Renegade is clearly wider than other AWD entries, meaning the shoulders of the two front-seat riders are suitably separated.

The Juke, on the other hand, has been with us since the 2011 model year. Its wild-style design is polarizing: You either love for it for its in-your-face, tall, haunched, bug-eyed appearance or hate it for the same reasons. A light restyle for 2015 has made it, if anything, even more mean-looking. The Juke’s layout and switchgear are straightforward even if the motorcycle-inspired gauges, shiny nylon upholstery, and colorful inserts give it far more design edge.

Interior space is adequate in the front, with a somewhat upright seating position, but quite cramped in the rear–and the Juke has less cargo space to boot, just 36 cubic feet with the rear seat folded down (which is how we expect most Jukes will be driven), against 51 cubic feet for the Renegade. In the end, the Jeep is simply far better at the utility jobs that many people need: hauling people and stuff.

The Jeep Renegade comes with two powertrain options. The base model is propelled by a 160-horsepower turbocharged 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine paired with a six-speed manual gearbox. If you don’t want to shift for yourself, you’ll move up to the 180-hp 2.4-liter four, which uses the new nine-speed automatic transmission that’s increasingly common in new Chrysler, Jeep, and Fiat products. Front-wheel drive is standard, with all-wheel drive optional for both engines.

The Nissan Juke is powered by a 188-hp, 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with either front- or all-wheel drive, and a continuously variable (CVT) transmission. The CVT makes it somewhat sluggish around town unless you drive it hard, when it tightens up and offers more fun. Performance fans, however, will go for the Juke NISMO or NISMO RS—both offering a manual gearbox. The NISMO RS gets a top-performance version of the same engine, boosted to 215 hp. The NISMO versions also get more than 100 upgrades to suit their hot-hatch personae.

While the NISMOs are in a separate category–they’re smaller competitors to cars like the Subaru WRX and VW Golf GTI–the conventional Juke powertrain just isn’t as direct or enjoyable to drive as the Jeep’s pair. Not to mention that the AWD Juke gave us truly atrocious fuel economy during a test several years ago–only slightly more than 20 mpg.

The Juke’s safety ratings are mixed–not unexpected for an older design–while the Renegade hasn’t yet been rated for crash safety by either the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

The 2015 Renegade comes in four trim levels: the base Sport (starting at $18,990 for the base 2WD version), the mid-level Latitude ($22,290), and the top-of-the-line Limited ($25,790). All-wheel drive is a $2,000 option. Then there’s the Trailhawk model ($26,990) with its greater off-road capability, which only comes with all-wheel drive and the larger 2.4-liter engine with the nine-speed automatic. All prices above include the mandatory $995 delivery fee.

The 2015 Juke starts at $21,705 and rises to more than $30,000 for a top-spec NISMO model. Even the base Juke S includes Intelligent Key with push-button start, a backup camera, and the NissanConnect system with Mobile Apps and a text message assistant. The mid-range Juke SV adds a moonroof; a rearview camera system; push-button start; satellite radio; the I-CON system; automatic temperature control; and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. The top-trim Juke (other than NISMO models) is the SL, which layers on navigation; leather-trimmed seats; and an 8-inch Rockford Fosgate subwoofer with six upgraded speakers.

Overall, the Jeep Renegade easily gets the nod here. When the Juke was the sole hot-hatch SUV on the market, it was a new and interesting way to get that capability in a smaller size than the usual compact crossover. But now that we have entries from not only Jeep but also Chevy, Fiat, and even Buick, the Juke comes up short: It’s too small and cramped, and doesn’t offer the sturdy off-roading ability of the littlest Jeep.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1098188_nissan-juke-vs-jeep-renegade-compare-cars?fbfanpage

The race is on: Cherokee vs Wrangler

The U.S. sales race is on between the Jeep Cherokee and the former front-running Jeep Wrangler. While the Wrangler epitomizes much of what Jeep used to be — its go-anywhere capability, nearly-all-American design and engineering, and the style-and-form ties to the original Army jeeps — the Cherokee is more practical for most people, more technologically advanced, and newer.

So far, the people have chosen the Cherokee, helped by constraints on the Wrangler’s production. Those constraints will not ease for at least a year, as the Cherokee is moved to a new plant (likely Sterling Heights or Belvidere) and the Wrangler moves into its spot.

The Wrangler has not had a full redesign for some years, and is missing some of the creature comforts of the Cherokee — some of which it can’t have anyway, since its removable roof and off-road chops reduce its comfort-and-convenience options. It is making do with a five-speed automatic, shared now only with the police edition of the Dodge Charger, while the Cherokee has a nine-speed which we’ve been assured will be completely sorted out for the 2016 model year.

So far, the Cherokee’s sales have been 178,785 from January 1 to October 31, 2015, well over the Wrangler’s 173,264. However, there’s time for the Wrangler to catch up as winter weather hits, though now it seems unlikely.

Last year, the Wrangler, at this time, was also second fiddle — to the Jeep Grand Cherokee, losing the race for #1 by around 3,400 sales. Cherokee sales are up 24% this year, Wrangler sales are up 17%, and Grand Cherokee is up just 4%. (Patriot is up by 29% but hasn’t broken 100,000 yet.) Part of the problem there, too, is capacity. Adding the Grand Cherokee to its factory-mate the Dodge Durango brings sales of 208,681. Cherokee and Wrangler each have their own factories.

The other Jeep race is between the new Jeep Renegade and the Jeep Compass. The Compass’ sales are up just 1%, year to date, at 52,987, while Renegade is brand new and has already cleared 44,626 sales. If Compass’ sales drop and Renegade supplies increase, the Italian-made newcomer could well beat the decade-old, heavily refreshed mini-Jeep.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/11/the-race-is-on-cherokee-vs-wrangler-30641

Wrangler looks to aluminum suspension, not body

The Jeep Grand Cherokee may have shown the future direction of the Jeep Wrangler: using aluminum and other lightweight materials for the suspension and peripherals, but not for the frame or key body parts.

Cheap body repairs are important for Wrangler, because it’s intended to be taken off-road. However, if the company can use relatively light, “high-strength” steel alloy for skid plates and more aluminum in the suspension and other major components, it could still cut weight, or at least maintain weight in the face of higher safety standards (both Federal and insurance-industry).

Key design changes, including using permanent A-pillars and having the windshield itself slide down over the hood rather than folding down both the windshield and pillars at once, could help the Wrangler to have greater “natural” torsional stiffness, so that chassis reinforcement would not be needed, also cutting weight while letting the Wrangler meet normal rollover standards.

The 2018 Jeep Wrangler is also likely to have a hydroformed frame, as Ram trucks do, increasing stiffness without weight gains. Some reports claim the windshield and grille will only be a little more slanted than the current Wrangler.

This gives the company more time to develop aluminum-bodied cars. Scuttlebutt now has the Grand Cherokee as the first to go with the expensive but lightweight metal.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/09/wrangler-looks-to-aluminum-suspension-not-body-29910

2018 Wrangler Spied! Hints at Upcoming Jeep Pickup

Outwardly, there’s not a lot to give away that this is the highly anticipated next-generation Jeep Wrangler. For all intents and purposes, it looks like a present-generation JK Rubicon two-door with a mesh mask over its grille and a flat-gray paintjob. However, a closer inspection reveals that this is not exactly your run-of-the-mill JK. Among several giveaways is a suspiciously low-hanging rear fuel tank. At first we thought it could be a diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) tank for the nearly certain diesel option, but we believe it’s just laying low because of the kludged body attached to the new chassis.

On the right side there’s what appears to be an electrical sensor wire running from underneath the hood and into the cab, indicating powertrain development testing. So what do we know for sure about the new JL Wrangler? We’re confident it will still have solid axles front and rear, a conventional two-speed transfer case, and a body-on-frame construction. There might be some aluminum on it, but we’ve been assured it will remain predominantly steel. Most models will get an eight-speed automatic, although we expect the six-speed manual to continue to be available. It will most likely get the next-generation Pentastar just announced for the 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee as standard. The diesel option could either be the 3.0L VM Motori EcoDiesel used in the Ram 1500 and Grand Cherokee or a 2.8L or 2.2L I-4. Regardless, expect at least 300 lb-ft of torque and well more than 400 if it’s the V-6.

The solid front and rear axles on this mule look to be significantly beefier than they are on the current Wrangler JK. Not only will these tougher axles provide better off-road performance and durability, they’ll also allow for other body configurations to enter the mix. As before, the Wrangler will come in short- and long-wheelbase styles, but, like we reported earlier this week, Jeep’s iconic off-roader will once again be available as a compact pickup (unseen in the Wrangler/CJ lineup since the dearly missed CJ-8). Those heavy-duty axles should safely enable a payload of at least 1,000 pounds in the Jeep pickup’s bed, to say nothing of the added weight of the longer frame and body. It’s yet to be ascertained whether the Wrangler truck will be a single-cab shortbed based on the Wrangler Unlimited’s wheelbase or if it will come with its own longer wheelbase.

UPDATE: Sources can confirm that the Wrangler will be available with the 3.0L EcoDiesel V-6 and eight-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission. There’s no word on whether a manual transmission will be available with the EcoDiesel.

Read more at: http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/research/2018-wrangler-spied-hints-at-upcoming-jeep-pickup/ar-AAdX3H7?ocid=fbmsnautos

Dick Scott’s Jeep Adventure Grand Opening

Attention Jeep Lovers, the Grand Opening of Dick Scott’s Jeep Adventure Off-Road Jeep Track is happening tomorrow, Saturday, August 22nd, from jeep-adventure12pm until 5pm. Bring your Trail-Rated Jeep out to Dick Scott Motor Mall for a Test Ride! Don’t have a Trail-Rated Jeep? No problem, Test Ride one of OURS!  Grand Grillin will be there cooking up free food and refreshments with a LIVE Radio feed throughout the afternoon hosted by David “Mad Dog” DeMarco of The Game 730am. We will also have a lot of great Give-A-Ways including Dick Scott Gift Cards, Jeep hats and t-shirts and much more…

Dick Scott’s Jeep Adventure test track is open to the public during our normal business hours. If there’s no one out at the track when you arrive, just head into the showroom and let us know you are ready to ride! Visit our website or click here to view our first-of-many GoPro videos of a test ride!

 

Let’s Find Out If The Jeep Renegade Is A Real Jeep

The 2015 Jeep Renegade got us all fired up when it first appeared; was this the ultimate “efficiency you need, capability you want” combo or just a little Italian car wearing daddy’s work boots? Time to take one off-road to find out.

Obviously the Renegade isn’t about to dethrone the Wrangler is the ultimate off-roadable SUV you can drive off a lot and straight to some place like Moab. But it’s not meant to, and it leaves its big brother in the dust when it comes to on-pavement comfort and fuel economy.

Even though we had to conduct our test on a pre-planned route under the watchful eyes of Jeep’s corporate ambassadors, I was more impressed by the vehicle’s abilities than I thought I’d be.

The Renegade is at home on routes that bleed the line between “dirt road” and “trail,” with enough in reserve to get you through that sketchy section you’d have to turn back at in a Honda HR-V.

A Renegade would be the wrong choice for somebody looking for a vehicle they could use everyday but “get into off-roading” with. Those people need a sedan and a CJ-7. The Renegade is the vehicle you want when you do most of your driving on the road, but like to buzz down dirt tracks free and easy (or look like you do) without the fuel economy or ride quality penalty you pick up with a bigger, taller, meaner 4×4.

Read more at: http://truckyeah.jalopnik.com/lets-find-out-if-the-jeep-renegade-is-a-real-jeep-1718262365