Archive for the ‘winter tips’ Tag

5 Winter Car Care Tips

Sometimes, it may be easy to forget about giving your car the tender loving care it needs to stay healthy. But with the heavy snow, icy roads and cold weather that winter can bring, now is the time to make sure to care for your vehicle.

Cold weather makes pliable material stiffer and more brittle and can make fluids thicker. If you live an area with severe winter weather, you know how dangerous the roads can get and the unique problems winter weather can create for your car.

So, take a look through our list of top five winter car care tips:


1. Take your car in for a tune-up.

If you haven’t taken your car to the shop for a while, now is the time to do so. A tune-up will help keep your car running longer and may save you money by detecting potential problems early.


2. Check your tires.

On slippery or icy roads, your tires are extremely important to giving you stability and controlled handling. So, make sure to check your tires’ pressure and wear. You can place a penny on its edge in a tread groove to test a tire’s tread. If you can see the top of his hair or any of the tires background, it is time to replace your tires. Do this in several spots because tires don’t wear evenly. You should also take your tires in to get rotated and properly balanced. If you’re in an area with particularly severe winter weather, you should consider purchasing a set of snow tires, which are made specifically for snowy and icy surfaces.


3. Check your fluids levels.

Make sure you check that the transmission, brake, power steering and windshield washer fluids and coolants are filled to proper levels. You should use de-icer windshield washer fluid which will help clear light ice and frost while preventing re-freezing.


4. Make a winter emergency kit.

In addition to the emergency road kit you should already have in your car, it is a good idea to have a special winter car kit. This kit should include things like cat litter or sand for tire traction on snow and ice, an ice scraper and de-icing liquid.


5. Check your air filters.

During the summer and fall, contaminants can get caught in your air filters and will eventually get caught inside your vehicle and cause problems. If you see any debris caught on the filter, it’s a good idea to get the filter replaced.

Read more at: http://blog.allstate.com/5-winter-car-care-tips/

Advertisements

Winterizing Your Car

Winter is right around the corner. Depending on where you live, colder weather and shorter days will bring some driving challenges. Don’t wait to winterize your car if you haven’t done so yet. This is also a good time to prepare yourself for the need to change your driving habits with the change of seasons. A little preparation now can give you added confidence when things get slippery. For folks that know “winter is coming”, here is some advice on what you need to do right now for safe winter driving.

Winterizing Your Car Starts With This

An inspection. It’s a good idea to give your car a thorough inspection once or twice a year. There is no better time to do this than in the fall, before the cold weather sets in. Even if you live in a more moderate climate, the days are shorter in the winter months, so you will likely use your lights more often. That’s why looking over things like headlights and signal lights are a good idea. Many automotive service centers will do a comprehensive check for free. But even if it costs you a small fee, the safety value is priceless.

3

Check Antifreeze

Starting with the obvious, you need to make sure that your antifreeze has adequate freeze-protection for the climate. Properly mixed antifreeze also adds an important measure of corrosion protection to the car’s cooling system. The normal 50/50 ratio between water and antifreeze can get watered down if you’ve kept adding water when topping it off. Also, antifreeze should be changed periodically as needed (check your owner’s manual). A mechanic can use a simple antifreeze/coolant testing tool to quickly measure whether the concentration of antifreeze is adequate to protect your engine. If the recommendation is for a “flush and fill”, this is money well spent. It just might save your engine block from cracking due to water freezing inside.

Check Belts and Hoses

Also take a look at the belts and hoses, as a failure there can leave you stranded without warning. Look for any signs of cracking.

Check Tires

The next obvious thing is the tires. If you live in a region that requires it, a snow tire may need to be fitted for the season. If you live in the mountains, you may need to keep a set of tire-chains in your trunk. If not, you should make sure you have sufficient tread of the correct design for your climate.

Less Obvious Things to Check

Now for the not so obvious. When you are checking the cooling system, make sure the engine thermostat is working as designed. A malfunctioning thermostat can make a car overheat, but a lesser known problem in the winter is that it will take the car longer to warm up, making it uncomfortable to drive and causing a reduction in fuel economy.

While you are at it, make sure the defroster works. You never know how much you need a defroster until you miss it. Something that is easily overlooked is the windshield washer fluid. Properly mixed, it will not freeze, and it can be a vital aid for clearing the windshield.

With these things out of the way, a cursory check of the brakes, suspension, and lights is always a good idea. If your wipers are no longer up to the task, or you can’t remember the last time you changed them, go ahead and do it now. Better safe than sorry.

Winter Safety Tips: What to Keep in Your Trunk

It’s a good time to get some basic winter-related safety items in the trunk. This is another thing that varies by the driving conditions you may encounter, a basic list of winter safety items could include:

Flares

Blanket

Sand bag(s)

Shovel

Flashlight

Drinking water (leave room for freezing)

Non-perishable snacks

Ice scraper

First Aid Kit

Jumper cables

More Car Winterizing Tips

Here a few simple tips to make your winter driving easier:

A little smear of petroleum jelly on the door weatherstrips will help keep your doors from freezing shut.

A small shot of WD40 keeps door locks from freezing.
If your door lock does freeze, heat the metal key with a cigarette lighter before putting it in the lock to help thaw it out. Never force the key.

Pull your visors down to a vertical position when you run your defroster to help trap the warm air against the windshield.

Your floor mats can be a traction aid in an emergency. Place them in front of the drive wheels and slowly try and pull out, it works more often than not.

Read more at: http://www.carfax.com/blog/winterizing-your-car/

Six Quick Tips for Sub-Zero Winter Driving

When it comes to winter car care, many motorists think of antifreeze and batteries, but vehicles need extra attention when temperatures drop below zero. The non-profit Car Care Council offers six quick tips to help your vehicle perform at its best during cold weather months.

1) Keep the gas tank at least half full; this decreases the chance of moisture forming in the gas lines and possibly freezing.

2) Check the tire pressure, including the spare, as tires can lose pressure when temperatures drop. Consider special tires if snow and ice are a problem in your area.

3) Have the exhaust system checked for carbon monoxide leaks, which can be especially dangerous during cold weather driving when windows are closed.

4) Allow your car a little more time to warm up when temperatures are below freezing so that the oil in the engine and transmission circulate and get warm.

5) Change to low-viscosity oil in winter as it will flow more easily between moving parts when it is cold. Drivers in sub-zero temperatures should drop their oil weight from 10-W30 to 5-W30 as thickened oil can make it hard to start the car.

6) Consider using cold weather washer fluid and special winter windshield blades if you live in a place with especially harsh winter conditions.

“Sub-zero temperatures can have a real impact on your vehicle,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Winter magnifies existing problems such as pings, hard starts, sluggish performance and rough idling, and very cold temperatures reduce battery power. If you haven’t had your vehicle checked recently, a thorough vehicle inspection is a good idea so you can avoid the aggravation and unexpected cost of a breakdown in freezing weather.”

As a precaution, motorists should be sure their vehicle is stocked with an emergency kit containing an ice scraper and snowbrush, jumper cables, flashlight, blanket, extra clothes, bottled water, dry food snacks and needed medication.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s popular Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

As read on: http://www.carcare.org/2015/01/six-quick-tips-sub-zero-winter-driving/