Archive for the ‘v-8’ Tag

2018 Dodge Demon delivers 840 horsepower, does 0-60 in 2.3 seconds

Concluding what has to be the longest teaser campaign in the history of the automotive industry, Dodge has unleashed the 2018 Challenger SRT Demon.

And the car doesn’t disappoint. In fact, it was banned by the NHRA because it’s too fast for the dragstrip.

With performance numbers that are mind boggling, this Dodge halo car is a perhaps the ultimate expression of the American muscle car.

It all starts with the numbers. Peak output is 840 horsepower and 770 pound-feet of torque, making it one of the most powerful V-8 cars ever produced, and that’s just the beginning.

It has so much power it can lift the front wheels off the ground for 2.92 feet, making it the first production car to do so, and that’s been certified by Guinness World Records.

The quarter mile time? A flat out amazing 9.65 seconds at 140 mph, and that was certified by the NHRA. For those keeping score at home, that means the Demon is the fastest production car in a straight line down the quarter mile.

It can pull 1.8 g in acceleration, and run 0-30 mph in 1.0 second while running 0-60 mph in just 2.3 seconds. Yes, you read correctly, and that makes it the fastest production car in the 0-60 mph sprint in the world, regardless of pricing or powertrain. Take that, Tesla.

The craziest part of it all? This beast is a factory-built car with a three-year/36,000-mile vehicle warranty, and a five-year/60,000-mile powertrain warranty.

How did all this happen? Dodge poured a massive amount of engineering into the Demon. This isn’t just a Hellcat with a wide-body kit and more boost. No, more than 50 percent of the engine components have been upgraded over those of the Hellcat.

The 2.7-liter supercharger is bigger than the Hellcat’s 2.4-liter unit. Of course, boost pressure is up 2.9 psi for a total of 14.5 psi of boost. The redline has been raised from 6,200 rpm to 6,500 rpm, and there’s now dual-stage fuel pumps instead of a single-stage pump. That massive air grabber hood? It’s part of a larger induction box along with two other air intake sources.

Like with the Hellcat, Dodge provides two keys. The black key, which you’ll never use, limits engine output to 500 horsepower. The red key unlocks 808 horsepower and 717 pound-feet of torque on regular gas, and if you use the red key and run 100+ octane gas while using the optional Direct Connection powertrain controller, you get the full and quite insane 840 horsepower and 770 pound-feet of torque.

And as we also learned from the barrage of teasers leading up to the Demon’s introduction, this muscle car comes prepared for the dragstrip with a power chiller, after-run chiller, TransBrake, Torque Reserve feature, available front runners, and available Demon crate with parts and tools for the strip.

The Demon rides on a square setup of street-legal drag tires specifically designed for the car by Nitto. Mounted on 18×11-inch aluminum wheels, the Nitto NT05Rs are 315/40s with a 15-percent larger contact patch than the Hellcat giving it, according to Dodge, twice the grip. We can only imagine that the turning radius is about 100 feet. For those who think that’s ridiculous, Dodge will also offer skinny frontrunner drag tires as part of the Demon Crate (more on that later).

For those who think the Hellcat is too fat, the Demon went on a diet to the tune of more than 200 pounds.

Just as you’ll find in other performance vehicles, including the Hellcats, the Demon has driving modes. Appropriately, they are Auto, which is also known as Street, Plus Drag, and Custom. These modes control everything from horsepower output and gasoline octane mode to suspension firmness, transmission calibration, steering, and where the cabin cooling is directed.

As you can tell, this is a serious car meant for the strip. Given that, a four-point harness bar (not a full roll cage) will be available from Speedlogix, and it bolts right into the Demon with mounting points straight from the factory.

Demons come stock with just a driver’s seat, but the rear seat and front passenger seat can be added back as an option for $1 each. While cloth seats are standard, leather is available.

Options are few, but that Demon Crate with tools and parts is on the list, as is the Direct Connection controller, trunk carpeting, a Harmon Kardon 900-watt 19-speaker audio system, a sunroof, and heated and ventilated leather front seats with a heated steering wheel. Buyers can get a satin black finish on the hood, or on the hood, roof, and decklid. We recommend the latter for maximum malevolence.

Dodge hasn’t set pricing, but only 3,300 Demons will be made with 3,000 going to the U.S. and 300 to Canada. Production will start this summer with Demons being unleashed to dealers this fall.

Before that it will prowl the halls of the 2017 New York auto show which starts Wednesday. For full coverage on the show, head to our dedicated hub.

Read more at: http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1109826_2018-dodge-demon-delivers-840-horsepower-does-0-60-in-2-3-seconds

2017 Ram Power Wagon Laramie caught

Brian Williams caught this 2017 2500 Ram Power Wagon Laramie while it was being tested in high altitudes in the Rockies. He wrote that it’s only missing the legacy “Macho Power Wagon” graphics and blacked out bits.

2017-HD

The brawny, off-road-oriented Power Wagon, revamped for 2017, will gain a more luxurious version for those who need the muscle but also want the pampering of the wood and leather-lined high-end trim offered on other Ram pick-ups.

The Laramie will get more brightwork as befitting of this top-spec Ram, with a new take on the Power Wagon’s Rebel-derived grille – a sort-of chromed mesh insert replaces black plastic. Chromed wheels are now wrapped in the chunky off-road tires, too.

Inside, the Power Wagon should get the typical Laramie treatment, which means upgraded leather with thick stitching and wood-like trim.

Expect to see the Laramie Power Wagon later this year.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/2016/06/2017-ram-power-wagon-laramie-caught-31987

New Jeep Grand Wagoneer To Be Shown To Dealers This Summer

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles [NYSE:FCAU] confirmed in its five-year strategy announcement made last year that it will launch a new Grand Wagoneer on the market in 2018. The vehicle, to be based on a heavily-updated version of the current Grand Cherokee platform, will be Jeep’s most expensive model, with high-end variants aimed at full-size luxury SUVs like the Cadillac Escalade, Land Rover Range Rover and Mercedes-Benz GL-Class.

While the vehicle is unlikely to be shown publicly for some time still, FCA is tipped to present the car at its biennial dealer meeting taking place in Las Vegas this August. Automotive News (subscription required) is reporting that FCA is teasing the new Grand Wagoneer to get more of its dealers to attend the meeting.

Work on the new Grand Wagoneer has actually been going on for several years already. FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne first confirmed plans for the vehicle as far back as 2011, although at the time he said it will launch in 2013. The last Grand Wagoneer bowed out of the market in 1991. Expect the new one to be a large, fully-capable SUV with third-row seats. Powertrains should include V-6 and V-8 options, with a diesel unit thrown in for some markets.

Stay tuned for an update.

Read more at: https://www.yahoo.com/autos/s/jeep-grand-wagoneer-shown-dealers-summer-170000984.html

What can we expect from the 2015 Dodge Charger R/T

The new Dodge Charger R/T is like the high-school athlete whose brothers have gone on to star in college and pro ranks. Indeed, with the formidable Hellcat V-8 and the SRT 392 hogging the spotlight, the kid brother’s credentials pale. After all, the 392 packs 485 horsepower and the Hellcat lays a 707-horse smackdown, heady numbers that could make one perceive the R/T’s 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 as a little tame.

Do not be deceived. Unless you have an insatiable appetite for shredding tires, the 5.7’s output—370 horsepower, 395 lb-ft of torque—will satisfy most needs for speed. Okay, the R/T is governed to a mere 145 mph versus the Hellcat’s 204, but you’ll still reach the Chinese takeout place before they pack up your food, and 5.1 seconds to 60 mph will leave most sedans gasping for breath.

Track Pack Plus

Surprisingly, given its mass, the R/T has a good dynamic résumé. The driver is aware of the substantial, two-plus-ton curb weight, but the Charger’s chassis tuning mitigates that number very well.

Thanks to a rigid unibody, the basic Charger R/T nicely manages yaw, pitch, and roll. But those who love to drive are advised to get the 29R Customer Preferred pack, which upgrades the car, as it did on our test example, to Road & Track spec. Doing so means a cornucopia of goodies including the Super Track Pak sport suspension; the Road & Track Performance Group with more aggressive throttle mapping, revised traction control (higher intervention threshold), heavy-duty brakes, 20-inch aluminum wheels, and sportier rubber (245/45 Goodyear Eagle RS-A2 all-season performance tires); and Dodge’s Performance Pages software, which allows the driver to track acceleration, cornering, and a variety of other numeric markers.

There’s a lot of other desirable stuff crammed into the 29R package, too, including nappa leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats (heated front chairs come on every R/T), a power tilt and telescope steering column, a heated steering wheel, power-adjustable pedals, and heated power mirrors, to hit a few high spots. At $3000 for all the foregoing equipment, it’s a must-have bargain collection.

Augmented by all the Track Pack goodies, the R/T dances even more remarkably well for a big car, the combination of quick (2.5 turns lock-to-lock), gratifyingly accurate electric power steering and firm suspension making it easy to place the car precisely where the driver wishes. And there’s enough grip to inspire confidence in very fast cornering.

It’s also very easy to develop affection for the eight-speed automatic. Shifts in the Charger aren’t quite as whap-whap quick as those delivered by some of the very best dual-clutch automatics, but one could call them deliberate, and in manual mode the transmission will hold the selected gear against redline—no autonomous upshifting.

The eight-speed is new for this year and slightly enhances EPA fuel economy versus last year’s five-speed unit, adding 1 mpg to the car’s city rating. That means 16 mpg in urban environs and 25 on the highway, on midgrade fuel, which is pretty good for a big V-8. We averaged 18 mpg in mixed driving. Would economy go up if the Hemi were fitted with direct fuel injection? Probably. But fuel economy isn’t a high priority for Hemi fans, nor for cars operating in this performance realm.

The car doesn’t have many demerits, and those it does have aren’t deal-breakers. We’ve already mentioned mass; cutting the curb weight would further improve handling and efficiency. The suspension tuning that gives the R/T its athletic reflexes can be a little stiff on gnarly pavement, and while grip—0.86 g—isn’t exactly a weak suit, it could be improved by a set of real summer performance tires.

Such tires would probably improve the braking performance, too, as 170 feet from 70 mph is long for a car with sports-sedan pretense. We detected no real fade in the system, but the pedal did begin to go a little soft after repeated hard stops.

The Right Stuff

Considered in standard trim and before its 2015 refresh, the Charger ranked behind mainstream sedan offerings like the Toyota Avalon and the Chevy Impala in our comparison test. But for the owner who wants a strong performance component in the everyday drive, the new R/T has the right stuff for an agreeable $33,990 starting MSRP.

Our test car got expensive quickly, however. In addition to the $3000 Preferred/R&T stuff (again, don’t leave the showroom without it), it had $6975 of additional options. These included $995 for Beats audio gear; $1795 for the Technology Group (rain-sensing wipers, auto high beams, and safety nannies); $295 for Driver Confidence equipment (blind-spot and cross-path warning, exterior puddle lamps); and $695 for navigation, infotainment goodies, and a backup camera. Our car also was fitted with a power sunroof ($1195), Redline Red paint ($500), and a black-painted roof ($1500).

The grand total came to $43,965. That’s more than the cheap-speed $40,990 R/T Scat Pack, although still well shy of the $48,380 Charger SRT 392. (The wild and wooly Hellcat opens at $64,990.) In any case, there do seem to be some opportunities for whittling. Okay, the red paint is probably important, as it emphasizes the aggressive styling. On the other hand, do you really need the safety technology, puddle lamps, or the black roof?

Options notwithstanding, this Charger figures as an underappreciated performance bargain in a full-size sedan. It’s everyday useful and ready to rock every day.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-charger-r-t-hemi-test-review

2015 Chrysler 300 V-8

Quick! Name an American, rear-drive, V-8–powered, full-size sedan. If you said, “Chrysler 300,” you’re only 15 percent right, because that’s the proportion of 300 buyers who actually opt for the V-8. The rest decide that the V-6 will suffice, a strong indicator that while the model name may be rooted in a high-performance heritage, the car sells mostly on its styling, size, and value. All the same, the V-8 is key to the car’s image so that’s the version we sought out first—in both the 300C and sportier 300S trims—to sample on roads in and around Austin, Texas.

A decade after Ralph Gilles’s design for the 2005 model caused an industry sensation, the 300 has been revamped a second time, with new nose and tail treatments featuring redesigned lights and a 32-percent larger grille, a fresh interior, and an eight-speed automatic operated by a rotary dial on the console. The EPA combined fuel-economy rating goes up 1 mpg to 19 (16/25 mpg city/highway) with the new transmission, the quicker shifting of which Chrysler says will also improve performance even though the engine is unchanged.

The 300 got a thorough redo in 2011, but for 2015 it gets no new sheetmetal, unlike its platform-mate, the Dodge Charger. It does add another trim level, the 300C Platinum. The C, S, and C Platinum all offer the V-8 as an option but the engine is not available on the base Limited, adding a perhaps-unintended layer of meaning to that version’s name.

Checking the option box for the 5.7-liter V-8 costs $3000, which gets you not only the 363-hp Hemi, but also bigger brakes (with dual- rather than single-piston calipers up front and ventilated rather than solid rotors in back) and a 160-mph speedometer. The 300S also gains a decklid spoiler, while C and Platinum trim levels get the paddle shifters that come standard on any S. This year, the V-8 can no longer be paired with all-wheel drive, owing to that combo’s abysmal take rate; evidently, people who already commit $2500 extra for AWD are disinclined to throw another three grand at the lump under the hood.

DIAL A GEAR

Brand president and CEO Al Gardner’s marching orders for Chrysler are to square up more directly against the industry’s volume-sales leaders, including Ford, Chevrolet, and Toyota. As Chrysler’s flagship, the 300 still has some near-luxury pretensions, but the sharpened focus gives Dodge precedence as the “performance” brand. This goes some way toward explaining the lack of a U.S.-market SRT8 version. The SRT8 will survive in some foreign markets, but its price point exceeds (and its sales volumes fall far short of) Chrysler’s targets for North America.

A pity perhaps, but mainstream buyers in search of a V-8’s bellowing torque still have the 5.7-liter and its 394 lb-ft to lust after. New mechanical elements are the eight-speed gearbox, electric-assist power steering, and a retuned suspension using aluminum components. Aside from the rotary-dial gear selector much like the one on the Chrysler 200, prominent changes inside include a handsome new steering wheel, a new instrument cluster, and a redesigned center stack. There’s a good division of labor between the 8.4-inch UConnect touch screen and the button interfaces, although we grew frustrated by a radio we couldn’t turn off—the volume can be muted, but it repeatedly reactivated itself without our bidding. Also, the heated-seat controls are buried in the touch-screen menu rather than given dedicated buttons; partially offsetting that annoyance, a seat-heat icon appears on-screen when you first start the car, so you can avoid the irritation if you’re quick.

Supplementing that screen is a new 7.0-inch driver-information display nestled between the tach and speedometer. As long as you’re okay with the dial-a-gear setup, the controls are all easier to figure out and use than in the previous model, even with the added indicators and buttons for the new electronic driver aids, which include adaptive cruise control with full-stop ability, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist, forward-collision warning, and brake assist. These are contained in the SafetyTec 2 package, a $1695 option; SafetyTec 1, also at $1695 and required to get SafetyTec 2, brings parking assist, blind-spot and cross-traffic alerts, as well as forward-collision and adaptive cruise.

WHERE THE HEMI MEETS THE ROAD

The first V-8 we drove was a 300C optioned up to $47,170 with all the electronic assists, Touring suspension, and 20-inch wheels wearing 245/45 all-season performance tires. It’s a handsome car in the more traditional Detroit mold with plenty of chrome trim and, as configured, most of the driver-oriented hardware that comes on a 300S, excluding only that version’s tauter suspension. The 300C proved to be a comfortable, relaxed commuter through Austin’s dense urban traffic despite a bit of road noise from the performance-grade rubber; standard 18-inch wheels with touring-grade tires are a better choice for the comfort-seeker.

Once we got out into Texas Hill Country and the winding two-lane roads that make the region a driver’s delight, the latest 300 was eager to demonstrate that, like its predecessors, it can handle much better than you’d ever expect of a 4350-pound four-door. To get the best out of it, turn the gear selector to “S,” which delivers crisper shifts and allows the driver to take full control of the eight gears via the paddles—it lets you bump against the rev limiter rather than shifting itself at redline.

Our complaints of lazy shifting in previous 300s have been addressed, especially with the dial in S. Whether the driver calls for them or lets the transmission think for itself, gearchanges are crisp, taking only 250 microseconds, according to Chrysler, versus 400 for the previous model with its five-speed automatic. The only flaw is that Chrysler’s paddles are small, sharing back-of-the-wheel space with audio-system buttons, making it too easy to change radio stations rather than gears. There’s also a Sport button on the center stack that calls up more-aggressive programs for the throttle and steering response.

Speaking of the latter, Chrysler seems to have done its sums right with the electric-assist steering. You wouldn’t call it communicative, but at its worst the feel is as good as that delivered by the previous hydraulic unit, and sometimes it’s better as full electronic control allows for sharper reflexes when you’re going hard without imposing any burden in parking maneuvers. It’s also adjustable through three settings via the center screen.

PLENTY OF GOODS TO BACK UP THE GOODNESS

While the Platinum layers on more luxury, the driver’s choice remains the 300S with the V-8. Our test example had the 300S Premium Group option pack ($3295), including a dual-pane panoramic sunroof, navigation, the big UConnect screen, the SafetyTec 1 features, satellite radio, and so on. Other notable options included a $895 Light Group with self-leveling HID headlamps, SafetyTec 2, and a roof painted black to contrast with the Redline red paint ($1500). Not all of that is essential gear, so it’s clear you can get the driving goodness of the 300S without spending the full $46,275 on this car’s sticker. That’s worth considering because at that price, you’re head-to-head with the Chevrolet SS, which comes fully loaded at its base price and now offers your choice of manual or automatic transmission. Also important, the Chevy is several hundred pounds lighter and a better performer overall.

The Chevy might not interest those into the 300 look and the Hemi heritage, but the keen drivers for whom that car might be an option should know that the tighter suspension in the 300S is worth having—with it, the car took a quicker set into a corner and was less inclined to pitch or roll than was the otherwise similar 300C when the back roads took on the contours of a stormy sea. The 300S’s attendant blacked-out trim and unique grille texture are more matters of taste.

Chrysler kept reminding us that the 300 model name turns 60 years old in 2015, harking back to the original C-300 of 1955. Sixty years ago, its 300 (gross) horsepower was a bunch of power and the C-300 was a bunch of car. It was also an early exemplar of a car company mating luxury and style with performance.

Even with the SRT8 version gone, the 2015 model combines respectable performance, elegant styling, useful technology, and surprising agility at a reasonable price. If it’s the V-8 configuration you want, this may be the time to step up. When FCA finally gets around to a clean-sheet redesign—expected for 2018—the V-8 will probably be even more rare, and more expensive, than it is now.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-chrysler-300-v-8-first-drive-review

2015 Dodge Challenger V-6 8-Speed Automatic

With a turbo four-cylinder Ford Mustang now a real thing, we’re moved to reexamine the genre of the entry-level muscle car, long associated with secretarial pools and rental-car lots. Under discussion today: the V-6–powered Dodge Challenger SXT, sporting a new eight-speed transmission and a redesigned interior. Is it still more show than go?

It’s certainly still got “show.” For 2015, Dodge adds 1971 cues to the basic 1970 styling theme, including its split-port grille inserts and quad taillamp treatment. Other updates include headlamps with stern-looking LED halo rings and smoother front and rear fascias.

If the Challenger’s body changes only a little, an utter transformation occurs inside. Stylists placed a 1971 Challenger dashboard in the studio during the design process, and its influence can be found in the sweet, conical gauges with hidden needles and classic fonts. But, overall, this is a modern space, with strong forms, soft-touch panels, and real aluminum trim.

The 3.6-liter V-6 is unchanged, but the new ZF eight-speed automatic is a massive improvement, exploiting all of the engine’s 305 horsepower and 268 pound-feet of torque while helping to raise fuel economy from 18 mpg city/27 mpg highway to 19/30. Zero-to-60 acceleration drops a bit from 6.4 seconds to a respectable, if not-quite-muscle-car-worthy 6.2. The weighty Challenger trails its V-6–powered competitors by about a second.

So the eight-speed auto doesn’t bring much in the way of performance improvements, but it is a nice piece with smooth, decisive shifts and predictive downshifting in sport mode. Steering-wheel paddles come with the Super Track Pak option ($695), which also brings 20-inch wheels, a more buttoned-down suspension, revised steering, dual-piston front brake calipers around larger 13.6-inch front rotors, and Dodge Performance apps.

Hustling around Portland International Raceway, the SXT with the Super Track Pak could easily hang with the 485-hp Challenger SRT 392 in the kinkier sections thanks to communicative steering, Goodyear summer tires, strong brakes, and roughly 300 less pounds, most of them coming off the front axle. With the power­train settings in sport, the eight-speed always found the power band’s sweet spot, allowing us to simply leave it in drive and still post impressive lap times.

On the road, the V-6 proves competent and unobtrusive, though the handling never lets you forget that the Challenger is essentially a Charger sedan with a few less inches in the middle. Dive into a tight corner and the car lists at turn-in, finds its legs, then stabilizes with some throttle. The grip is there, but it drives big. Classic muscle-car stuff.

And yet, the Challenger SXT needs to be a bit quicker—and sound meaner—for us to consider it a true muscle car. That would help justify our loaded SXT Plus test car’s $37,255 price tag. But, especially with the Super Track Pak option, the V-6 Challenger is getting closer.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-challenger-v-6-8-speed-test-review