Archive for the ‘usa’ Tag

New York City sets start date of April 20 for Taxi of Tomorrow with Nissan

NEW YORK – New York City’s Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC) has set April 20, 2015, as the program start date for the Taxi of Tomorrow program, which calls for most retiring taxis to be replaced with the Nissan NV200 and will significantly increase the number of wheelchair-accessible taxis in the fleet.

Based on the TLC Taxi of Tomorrow guidelines, Nissan NV200 Taxi will be the sole option for Manhattan yellow taxis not being replaced by a hybrid or an alternate wheelchair-accessible vehicle (WAV) where additional choice among competitors is maintained. Nissan is working with BraunAbility, the global leader in automotive mobility, to provide WAV Nissan NV200 Taxis, which now are available for purchase.

More than 500 Nissan NV200 Taxis already are in service in New York City. The Nissan NV200 Taxi has more content specifically tailored to use as a New York City cab than any vehicle prior to it including important safety features.

The Nissan NV200 taxi is the only taxi that leaves the factory with the installed partition, which has been specifically designed to ensure that no safety features are compromised by after-market installations. In fact, the Nissan NV200 Taxi was crash-tested with the partition and meets Federal safety standards, an attribute no other automaker provides for taxis. After-market installations in some taxis can render safety features such as airbags non-functional.

The Nissan NV200 also meets global pedestrian-protection standards aimed at softening the impact to a pedestrian if struck by a vehicle.

Following its selection as the exclusive Taxi of Tomorrow provider, Nissan engaged with organizations long at the forefront of the Taxi of Tomorrow program, including the Design Trust for Public Space, Smart Design and the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum.

Nissan created its own “New York Ave.” at its Arizona proving grounds to replicate harsh conditions of NYC streets to rigorously test the Nissan NV200 taxi to tune the suspension specifically to NYC road conditions. Additionally, Nissan hired New York City cab drivers to test vehicles around the city, collecting data that was used to refine the vehicle. In total, these drivers logged enough miles to cover every street in Manhattan more than 300 times.

The Nissan NV200 taxi also offers passengers a variety of amenities to make their trip more pleasant, including ample cargo room for transporting luggage and USB charging ports in addition to a 12-volt electrical outlet.

The Nissan NV200 Taxi offers a functional and spacious interior housed in a compact exterior footprint; in fact, when the Nissan NV200 Taxi is deployed across the entire taxi fleet, the equivalent of five square-acres of space will be freed up on city streets.

Key safety features include:

– Front and rear-seat occupant curtain airbags specifically designed to deploy around the integrated partition and seat-mounted airbags for the front row

– Standard traction control and Vehicle Dynamic Control

– Sliding doors to lessen risk of pedestrians, cyclists and other motorists getting struck by doors opening unexpectedly

– Lights that alert other road users that taxi doors are opening

About Nissan NV200 Taxi

Drawing on insight from New York taxi drivers, medallion holders, fleets and passengers, the Nissan NV200 taxi features more content tailored specifically to the unique needs of metropolitan cab service than ever before. In addition to stunning views of the city, other new features include:

– Ample room for four passengers and their luggage, offering substantial improvements over current and recently-unveiled taxi models

– Breathable, antimicrobial, environment-friendly, durable and easy-to-clean seat fabric

– Sliding doors with entry step and grab handles, providing easy entry and exit

– Mobile charging ports for passengers, including a 12-volt electrical outlet and two USB ports

– Flat “no hump” passenger floor area for more comfortable ride and easy entry and exit

– Independently-controlled, rear air conditioning

– Active carbon-lined headliner to help neutralize interior odors

– Overhead reading lights for passengers and floor lighting to help locate belongings

– Opening side windows

Other notable NV200 taxi features focus on driver comfort, customer satisfaction and the environment:

– A low-annoyance horn with exterior lights that indicate when the vehicle is honking, so the horn is used less frequently

– Hearing Loop System for the hearing impaired

– Driver and passenger intercom system

– A 6-way adjustable driver’s seat featuring both recline and lumbar adjustments, even with a partition installed

– Proven 2.0L 4-cylinder powertrain, engineered to enhance the emission performance and fuel efficiency of the taxi fleet

– 150,000-mile powertrain warranty

– Unique driver’s seat material and stitching to promote improved airflow

– USB auxiliary audio input and charge port for driver

– Standard navigation system with integrated rearview backup monitor

– All necessary wiring and installation provisions

The NV200 taxi is now on sale at select Nissan dealerships in the greater New York City area. Total manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of the vehicle is approximately $29,700.

As read on: http://nissannews.com/en-US/nissan/usa/releases/new-york-city-sets-start-date-of-april-20-for-taxi-of-tomorrow-with-nissan

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Stop, Start, Save – Fuel-Saving Technology Standard on Jeep Cherokee

Chrysler Group is offering fuel-saving Engine Stop-Start (ESS)
technology as standard equipment on certain models of the award-winning
2015 Jeep Cherokee mid-size SUV and all-new 2015 Chrysler 200 mid-size
sedan.

Jeep Cherokee customers who choose the available 3.2-liter Pentastar
V-6, and Chrysler 200 customers who opt for the 2.4-liter Tigershark
I-4, and will experience estimated fuel-economy improvements of up to
three percent, compared with the conventional vehicle-engine pairings.

“We’re taking highly efficient engines and upping the ante to further
benefit our customers,” said Mike Duhaime, Global Director-Electrified
Powertrain Propulsion Systems. “ESS leverages intricate control
strategies to deliver a superior driving experience, as well as the
expected fuel-savings and emissions-reduction.”

ESS applications in the Jeep Cherokee and Chrysler 200 and will
account for an estimated C02 emissions-reduction of up to three percent.

Availability in the popular Jeep Cherokee is scheduled for third
quarter. ESS arrives the following quarter in the all-new Chrysler 200.

ESS works this way:

– Engine controls constantly monitor vehicle speed

– When the vehicle brakes to a stop, fuel flow is cut and engine turns off – events that save gas and reduce emissions

– Beefier batteries maintain other vehicle systems so in-cabin comfort is unaffected

– When the brake pedal is released, the engine automatically restarts and the nine-speed automatic transmission, the segment-exclusive
nine-speed automatic transmission is engaged – all within 0.3 seconds

If a driver chooses to forgo the benefits of ESS, the feature can be
deactivated with the push of a button, and then reactivated.

Efficiency and refinement are hallmarks of the Tigershark and Pentastar engine families. ESS just complements these attributes.

The Cherokee’s available 271-hp 3.2-liter Pentastar V-6 is derived
from the acclaimed 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6, named three times one of
Ward’s 10 Best Engines. The smaller-displacement V-6 helps the Cherokee
deliver fuel-economy improvements of up to 30 percent, compared with the
model it replaces.

Individual exhaust-manifold runners are integrated into the aluminum
cylinder-head casting, a key Pentastar-family differentiator. This
design feature reduces weight and affords packaging benefits.

The 24-valve engine’s 10.7:1 compression ratio aids in lowering fuel
consumption and improves performance while its variable-displacement oil
pump further reduces parasitic losses to maximize fuel economy. The
pump is programmed to operate as needed, staying in low-pressure mode
below 3,500 rpm, and then bumping up pressure as demand follows
engine-speed.

The high-tech transmission – which also comes standard in the Jeep
Cherokee – dispenses power smoothly for elevated refinement. Such
performance is made possible because the ratio steps between its gears
are smaller than those of other transmissions.

The Jeep Cherokee has earned multiple media accolades, from Rocky
Mountain Automotive Press Association’s SUV of the Year to 2014 Canadian
Utility Vehicle of the Year, courtesy of the Automobile Journalists
Association of Canada (AJAC).

As read on: http://www.chryslergroup360.com/featured_news/stop-start-save/

2011 Nissan Leaf At Two Years: 32,000 Miles, No Signs Of Age

Almost two years ago, I took delivery of one of the very first 2011 Nissan Leafs to be imported into the United Kingdom.

With its two-year anniversary approaching, and more than 32,000 miles on the clock, has our family’s opinion of the Nissan Leaf changed?

What has life with the car been like? And do we regret buying it?

Just as we said last year, our 2011 Nissan Leaf has generally aged appropriately.

But let’s start at the beginning.

In late March 2011, we drove our new family car 45 miles home from the dealership, plugged it in for the first time, and named the resplendent red car Hiro Nakamura–after the earnest Japanese superhero on NBC’s Heroes.

As the miles piled up, I shared the things we already liked and disliked about Nissan’s first mass-produced battery electric car.

We also documented Hiro’s life with us, including a visit to the dealer for an official software update recall, various odometer milestones, and a summary one-year drive report.

Wear and tear

Since that report a year ago, nothing else has broken. A few things have either required replacement due to standard wear and tear, or niggle at us on a daily basis.

-During our second periodic service, the front windshield wipers were replaced because the blades had separated from the wiper.
-An annoying squeak over rough ground has developed. It seems to originate from the area between the right-hand driver’s seat and the center console. As yet, we’ve been unsuccessful in pinpointing exactly what is making the noise.
-The driver’s side floor mat — an original Nissan accessory — has lost an eyelet, though it remains securely fastened to the floor.
-The rear carpets and the backs of the front seats have started to look much more worn than two-year-old interior fabrics should.
-The power windows, while functional, remain slow to operate. This is especially noticeable in colder weather.

2011 Nissan Leaf

Range and battery life

Unlike Nissan Leafs in much warmer climates (Phoenix, Arizona, for example), the generally temperate U.K. climate has so far been kind to the battery pack of our Nissan Leaf.

Despite six months of daily 80-mile freeway commutes with twice-daily recharging, our Leaf has shown no noticeable signs of battery degradation.

No battery capacity bars have disappeared, and the Leaf is easily capable of 75 to 80 miles on a full charge, depending on how it is driven, the type of road, and the temperature.

Even more impressive is the fact that several long-distance trips during the past year–covering thousand miles and requiring multiple quick-charges in a single day — have also had no noticeable impact on the battery health either.

Because few rapid chargers exist in the U.K., we often had to recharge the battery not to the recommended 80 percent but to 98 percent of capacity–something Nissan doesn’t recommend.

But regardless of the frequent quick-charging, the most recent battery health report from our dealer gave the car a five-star rating overall.

Four stars were given for “charging when already at a high level of charge,” no doubt caused by the rapid charging from 80 to 98 percent full. No warnings were issued for battery health or charging behavior.

Also worth of note: Despite numerous low-battery and very-low-battery warnings, our car has never entered the fabled ‘turtle mode’.

Carwings and charging

It would be nice to report that Nissan has improved its Carwings telematics service over the past two years. But it hasn’t, and the service remains the weakest link of owning a Leaf.

To start, Carwings’ charging-station information remains patchy and inaccurate (though this may vary by country; it is certainly the case in the U.K.).

In November, while on the way to a business meeting, inaccurate Carwings data directed me to a charging station that simply did not exist. Without the range to make it to the next charging station, I was forced to look for a standard outlet to charge at.

Ultimately, the car ended the day on the back of a tow truck after I failed to find an alternative place to charge.

Carwings’ inaccuracies don’t stop there. According to the odometer in our Leaf, it has traveled a little more than 32,000 miles since new. Carwings reports that it has only traveled 25,000 miles.

Moreover, its range predictions haven’t improved despite a software upgrade. On one occasion, less than 10 minutes after we’d quick-charged the battery to 98 percent, Carwings proudly warned us that, laden with two adults, two children, two dogs and luggage, our car wouldn’t reach its destination.

Thirty minutes later, we arrived safely at our destination, with at least 15 miles to spare. (Carwings failed to apologize.)

The iPhone Carwings app has also been a trial. For three months, it refused to connect to the Carwings servers, making remote monitoring and presetting the climate control only possible through a third-party app, LeafLink.

It took Nissan U.K. two months to rectify the issue.

Performance and handling

Almost two years after leaving the dealer, our 2011 Nissan leaf still performs as it did when new–accelerating well under most conditions, with only a hint of sluggishness when battery charge or temperature is low.

We replaced the factory-standard Ecopia E150 tires with aftermarket Michelin Energy Saver tires, and our now Leaf performs and handles far better than it did when new. The body roll is reduced, handling feels more precise, and grip seems improved.

And with longer tread life, we’ve already managed almost as many miles on the Michelins as we did on the original Ecopias–with half the tread on the newer tires still remaining.

2011 Nissan Leaf

Our verdict: No regrets

After nearly two years and more than 32,000 miles, our 2011 Nissan Leaf still performs as we had hoped it would when we bought it.

Our dealer experience has been good, with our local dealer still offering exemplary servicing for a very reasonable price.

Including servicing, insurance, electricity, and loan payments, our 2011 Nissan Leaf has cost us somewhere in the region of $18,000 so far.

It has also saved us more than $10,000 in gasoline costs compared to our previous car, a 1992 Volvo 240 Wagon.

As for regrets? There are none.

In fact, driving the Leaf has become such a part of our family life that we’ve now invested in a second electric car: a 2013 Renault Twizy microcar.

Which means our gas-guzzling 2008 Toyota Prius is now relegated to the lowly position of long-distance third car.

As Read on: http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1082571_2011-nissan-leaf-at-two-years-32000-miles-no-signs-of-age/page-2