Archive for the ‘the henry ford museum’ Tag

The 2014 Top 20 Places to take children in the Ann Arbor – Detroit Area

Ann Arbor is rich in fun events and exciting places. It was hard for our readers to select their favorites from the hundreds of choices! The venues listed below are wildly popular with kids and families in Ann Arbor But don’t miss out on ALL the other wonderful places as well! Browse through our site and discover lots more to do!

 

1. The Detroit Zoo

2. Motor City Theatre

3. Ann Arbor Hands-on-Museum

4. Airtime Trampoline & Game Park

5. Wild Swan Theater

6. The Henry Ford – America’s Greatest History Attraction

7. Kelsey Museum of Archaeology

8. Farmer Charleys Corn Maze

9. Zap Zone

10. Leslie Science & Nature Center

11. The Complete Dancer

12. Stagecrafters – The Baldwin Theater

13. Detroit Institute Of Art

14. Toledo Zoo

15. PuppetART Theater

16. Michigan Science Center

17. Goldfish Swim School – Ann Arbor

18. The Detroit Tigers

19. Mosaic Youth Theatre of Detroit

20. Dinosaur Hill Nature Preserve

 

Winners in Special Categories

In the second part of our survey, we asked readers to select their favorites in seven categories. Here were their choices.

Favorite Kid-Friendly MuseumAnn Arbor Hands-on-Museum

Favorite Nature CenterLeslie Science & Nature Center

Favorite Performing ArtsWild Swan Theater

 

Favorite Indoor Play CenterAirtime Trampoline & Game Park

Favorite Farm (agri-entertainment)Blake’s Orchard & Cider Mill

Favorite Place to have Fun OutdoorsMichigan’s Adventure

Favorite Professional Sports TeamThe Detroit Tigers

Favorite Arts Education CenterCranbrook Academy of Art

 

Favorite Sports Education CenterYMCA

Advertisements

The Art of Building with LEGO® Exhibit at The Henry Ford Museum

Draw inspiration for creating your own designs from the LEGO® Architecture: Towering Ambition exhibition in Henry Ford Museum. LEGO® Certified Professional Adam Reed Tucker has re-created famous landmarks entirely with LEGO® bricks. The exhibition includes 13 models: Fallingwater, 7 South Dearborn, Chicago Spire, John Hancock Center, Marina City, Willis Tower, Trump Tower, Burj Khalifa, Empire State Building, St Louis Arch, TransAmerica Building, Jin Mao Tower and one of the World Trade Center towers.

Explore the architectural wonders, and then start your own construction project in the nearby play pit. When finished with your masterpiece, place it on our large-scale LEGO® city map that will grow in size with every new builder’s addition.

LEGO® Architecture: Towering Ambition was developed by the National Building Museum, Washington D.C. Play area sponsored through in-kind donation from LEGO® Systems, Inc. LEGO®, its logo and the brick and knob configuration are trademarks of the LEGO Group. © 2010-12 The LEGO Group.

Download a digital flyer for this event
activities
Opening Weekend, November 3 & 4
See architectural artist Adam Reed Tucker build a LEGO® version of the Detroit landmark Ford Field.

LEGO® Create
After drawing inspiration from awe-inspiring structures, visitors are encouraged to create buildings to include in a LEGO® community. Using principles of good urban design, you’ll be invited to create a building from one of the four categories — residential, commercial, institutional and industrial — and then place the LEGO® models on a large-scale city map.
Daily through February 24, 9:30am–5pm
Inside Museum Gallery

LEGO® train
Don’t miss our LEGO® train created by Michigan LEGO® User Group
Daily through February 24, 9:30am-5pm
Near Allegheny Locomotive

Duplo® & Soft LEGO® Play Area
1- to 5-year–olds.
Daily through February 24, 9:30am–5pm
Depot Town – near the Allegheny Locomotive

Learn to Build Saturdays!
Make and buy OR make and leave.
Every weekend December 1–30, 10am–4pm

Brick Challenge with Nick Brickly
A double-dare-style LEGO® challenge with Michigan LEGO® User Group
Every Saturday, January 5–26, 11:30am–2pm

Adam Reed Tucker Returns!
Last time to see and meet architecture artist Adam Reed Tucker.
February 23–24

As read on: http://www.thehenryford.org/events/legoArchitecture.aspx

“Fitting out” the Texaco service bay in Driving America

The new Driving America Exhibit is ONLY 5 days away from opening at the Henry Ford Museum! This remarkable mix of hundreds of historically significant vehicles, artifacts, digital media, interactive play and personal accounts, makes this exhibit like no other exhibit!

Driving America will offer a brand-new opportunity for kids to pretend they’re auto mechanics. And what better place for this to occur than inside the service bay of the Texaco station—a space that’s been closed to the public since this historic building was brought to Henry Ford Museum in 1987?

Inside this newly-opened space, kids will be able to change tires and mufflers, check fluids and filters, and use a creeper to glide under a ¾-scale, 1960s-era car. Our Education team has made sure that these activities are safe, easy to understand, and age-appropriate.

But the curators got a different assignment:  create the atmosphere of an auto garage from the 1960s era using real artifacts. We are, after all, a history museum. We pride ourselves on authenticity. And we wanted to include real objects that adults could relate to and talk about with kids who had never heard of things like rust-proofing.

But how to go about creating that atmosphere?

We looked at old pictures of service bay interiors (there weren’t many). We shared our memories (or those of our husbands or fathers) of old auto garage interiors. We considered what was available from our own collection and what could be acquired through outside sources. (The designation “NOS” on eBay turned out to be a goldmine to the world of “new old stock” auto accessories.)

Just furnishing the space as a look-in would have been easy, but the ultimate challenge was that people would be entering this space, potentially touching and interacting with these items. So we determined that some things would be placed low and would invite touching (like the hubcaps), while rarer items, like the license plates, would be placed higher up.

It’s sometimes hard for us literal-minded curators to think about how to furnish a space that’s “just pretend”…but that’s what we tried to do here.

Do you have any memories of old full-service stations like our Texaco one, or remember hearing details of them from your parents or grandparents? Share them in the comments section below – and be sure to check out the Texaco Service Bay when “Driving America” opens this Sunday, January 29!

As read on: http://blog.thehenryford.org/2012/01/fitting-out-the-texaco-service-bay-in-driving-america/