Archive for the ‘summer vacation’ Tag

Is Your Car Ready for a Road Trip?

If you are planning a road trip this summer, it’s important to remember that you shouldn’t just put gas in your car and go, says the non-profit Car Care Council. A pre-trip vehicle check can determine how road-ready your vehicle is so you can take steps to have any problems fixed before heading out for vacation.

Before you hit the road, the Car Care Council recommends a vehicle check to help avoid the inconvenience, potential safety hazards and unplanned expense of breaking down miles away from home.

– Check filters and fluids, including engine oil, antifreeze/coolant, windshield washer and power steering, brake and transmission fluids. Dirty air filters can waste gas and cause the engine to lose power.

– Check the hoses and belts and replace if they become cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or show signs of excessive wear. These are critical to the proper functioning of the electrical system, air conditioning, power steering and the cooling system.

– Check the brake system and make sure the battery connection is clean, tight and corrosion-free.

– Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Under inflated tires reduce a vehicle’s fuel economy and uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.

– Check the engine to make sure it is delivering the best balance of power and fuel economy and produce the lowest level of emissions.

– Check that the gas cap is not damaged, loose or missing to prevent gas from spilling or evaporating.

“With summer vacation season upon us, a thorough inspection of your vehicle will give you peace of mind and help make your road journey safer,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Taking a few minutes to ‘be car care aware’ will make for a less stressful and more fun adventure.”

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide, which is now available electronically, or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2016/06/car-ready-road-trip/

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11 Ways to Reclaim a Relaxing Summer for Your Family

Summers start with the best intentions. We fantasize about long, peaceful days at the beach building sand castles with our toddlers or playing tennis with our teens. Casting off a busy school year, we’re excited to finally relax the rules. Yes to the ice cream cones with insanely sugary toppings just before bedtime (heck, what bedtime?). Yes to the car keys (so what if it’s three late nights in a row?). Breakfast brownies? Why not? Another TV show? Sure, go ahead. It’s summer vacation, right?

Then, in Week Three, reality sets in: the bedtime routine now takes twice as long, everything has become a negotiation, and those idyllic days at the beach — well, they’ve become the setting of the sunscreen wars. How did these relaxing summer days get so… stressful?

Whether your kids are having a throwback 1970s summer, a Free-Range or a Hovering Helicopter summer, beware of the ever-tempting “summer slide.” The summer slide is the parenting equivalent of the “summer brain drain,” where what we know as parents slides, well, down the drain. In an effort to keep our summer fantasy alive, we sometimes bend our rules just a little too much and then suddenly… SNAP.

Before things get totally out of control, let’s get back to the basics, kindergarten-style — and start digging our way out of this sand pit to avoid getting buried alive. It’s worth reminding ourselves that summer is a break from routine, after all, not a break from parenting.

Here are 11 things you can do now to reclaim your relaxing summer:

1. Stop with all the choices.
Teachers offer “choice” in small doses. They don’t offer a range of snacks and they don’t ask kids if they’d rather go to art class or gym class. Giving too many choices gives up too much control, and teachers know to do that sparingly.

2. Go ahead, disappoint.
You-Get-What-You-Get-And-You-Don’t-Get-Upset. Don’t be afraid to disappoint. Resilience, learning how to bounce back, is a skill that can be taught, but not if we’re smoothing over every conflict just to avoid a momentary tantrum or mommy guilt. We need to learn to live with the short-term discomfort and concentrate on the long-term gain.

3. Sloooow down.
Seeds grow slowly; chicks hatch when they are ready; important things take time. Children and teens don’t understand time — they want what they want when they want it. We too often react by jumping on their timeline. When we contort ourselves to suit their whims, we not only upend our lives, we give away the opportunity to teach them about patience.

4. Stop asking permission, OK?
“Mommy just has to run this quick errand, OK?” Teachers don’t ask permission. Ending declarative sentences with question marks is giving power to a little person who doesn’t actually want it. What children want is the security of limits and parents who know when to say no, even in the summer.

5. Let them clean up.
Overscheduled children don’t have time to clean their rooms or do their chores. Teens with summer jobs and SAT prep are just too busy to pick up their clothes off the floor. In school, if you haven’t cleaned up your mess, then you cannot move on to your next activity. By failing to insist upon this at home, we let our kids control the disorder in our houses and in our lives.

6. Revisit Oz.
The single most exciting thing that happens in kindergarten is that children take their first steps on the way to reading — starting on a yellow brick road that leads to a vast magical world they can now visit on their own. And then we and our kids get busy and forget about the Emerald City because life is too rushed and there is already too much reading assigned at school. Take back Oz; remember how lucky our kids felt when they first decoded the printed page.

7. Circle time.
It’s important to ask our kids about their day, every day. Create your own version of “circle time” at home. Tell the kids about your day, your challenges and triumphs, and ask them about theirs. This becomes even more important with teens, who will know that sharing what they are up to with their parents is just part of the deal.

8. Teachers, not friends or fairy godmothers.
When we try to be our child’s friend, we not only cede authority, we actually cheat them out of a more important relationship. We are there to teach and love and guide, not to grant their every wish.

9. Rest time.
Teachers know the importance of rest. Regular and adequate sleep is essential for kids at every age. Even tweens and teens should have a regular bedtime right up through high school. The end of summer should not be like a bad bout of jet lag, with no one able to get to sleep at night or up in the morning.

10. Mind their manners.
Manners never stop mattering. As parents, we all too often rush, cut corners, forget to be as polite as we could and let our kids get away with the glib manners of the 21st century. Nothing has changed; manners are still magical and it is within our power to teach them.

11. Summer doesn’t equal spoiling.
At every age, kids think getting everything they want will make them happy, and it will be a very long time before they learn this isn’t true. We know the truth, and if we don’t teach this lesson early and often, the unbridled greed inspired by media can soon overwhelm our family’s true values. Days at the beach are a treat. A family vacation is something special. Summer doesn’t have to equal spoiling.

Summer is just a different season, not a different childhood. It can be so easy to confuse the two.

As read on: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/grown-and-flown/11-ways-to-reclaim-a-relaxing-summer-for-your-family_b_5566703.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000037

Polar Vortex To Take a Summer Vacation Next Week; South to the Great Lakes

Ironically, just over six months to the date of the first notable visit of the winter polar vortex (this is nothing new of course; happens every year but with varying intensities); she is expected to make a return visit mid summer. What IS impressive on this visit (not unlike her past winter visits) is the depth and position south. At early inspection, the upper low “polar vortex” is expected to average around 3 deviations BELOW average for a summer type upper low over the upper Great Lakes. Along with the fanfare of her arrival will be strong upper winds /jet stream/ and possibly some tough weather in the form of wind storms with such impressive energy at and above ground level. When such cold air (for summer standards) rudely plows into even temperate summer like temperatures (in this case 70s to lower 80s), something’s got to give.

The two questions are when and where the best clash of the notably different atmospheres will be; which will be involving very impressive dynamics and instability levels at the time. It’s much too early to give an exact timing but an estimate seems to be in the late Sunday into Monday time frame for it’s arrival – and early – mid week when she spins up over southern Canada and northern Great Lakes. Even at this time, if available moisture is in place, it wouldn’t take much to pop a gusty storm or shower with such cold conditions aloft along with the impressive strong winds.

Projections for upper heights and widespread low level cool temperatures are some of the best (lowest) I’ve seen for mid July. Upper low height projections are sub 550 MB /546 MB/ on the GFS along with 850 MB temperature projections in the single digits. At the coolest (preliminary timing; Tuesday night-Wednesday morning) widespread overnight lows in the 40s to lower 50s are likely across Southeast Lower Michigan with highs around 60 to the mid 60s. If these temperatures are realized, both record low maxs and record low mins may be in jeopardy. Record low max’s for mid July are in around 60 to mid 60s across the region, while record lows are in the 40s to near 50. One glaring exception is a record low max of just 74 degrees in Flint on the 16th, much higher than other record low maxs from the 14th thru the 16th.

Its too early to predict the exact coolness of the air mass due over the area early-mid week during next week but model projections have been pretty well unanimous on this summer cool outbreak – it is coming with the particulars yet to unfold. If you are heading up north this weekend and plan to stay awhile pack for fall-like weather for a few days – LOL- really not a bad idea in Southeast Michigan too.

As read on:http://weatherhistorian.blogspot.com/2014/07/polar-vortex-to-take-summer-vacation.html

Is Your Car Road Ready?

If your vacation plans include a road trip, the last thing you want is to have unexpected car trouble to leave you stranded at the side of the road, ruining all the fun. A pre-trip vehicle check is the best way to be car care aware and ensure that your car is ready to get you to your destination, says the non-profit Car Care Council.

The Car Care Council recommends the following pre-trip checklist before hitting the road this summer:

–         Check the brake system and make sure the battery connection is clean, tight and corrosion-free.

–         Check filters and fluids, including engine oil, power steering and brake and transmission, as well as windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant. Dirty air filters can waste gas and cause the engine to lose power.

–         Check the hoses and belts that can become cracked, brittle, frayed, loose or show signs of excessive wear. These are critical to the proper functioning of the electrical system, air conditioning, power steering and the cooling system.

–         Check the tires, including tire pressure and tread. Underinflated tires reduce a vehicle’s fuel economy and uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots.

–         Check that the gas cap is not damaged, loose or missing to prevent gas from spilling or evaporating.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2014/05/is-your-car-road-ready-for-summer/

Value, Safety, Luxury – the 2012 Chrysler Town & Country

The 2012 Chrysler Town & Country is the ultimate family vehicle – and the ultimate value. That’s why we’ve spent the past month delving into how we’ve engineered the latest iteration of our legendary minivan to satisfy everyone in the family – mom, dad, the kids, and the checkbook.

The 2012 Chrysler Town & Country is fuel efficient. Don’t worry about rising fuel costs hampering summer vacation plans, because the Town & Country delivers an EPA estimated 25 MPG on the highway. The Town & Country is the best way to travel with your family.

The Chrysler Town & Country is a leader in segment firsts. Chrysler never stops innovating and the 2012 Chrysler Town & Country is a product of that unwavering dedication to making the best family vehicle imaginable.

The 2012 Chrysler Town & Country Limited has more features for less. The 2012 Town & Country Limited is a value that competitors can’t match. Premium features come standard: a class-exclusive heated steering wheel, heated 2nd row seats, power 3rd row folding seats and more.

The Chrysler Town & Country is the “Most Awarded Minivan Ever”. With over 50 accolades since its inception, the Town & Country continues to rack up awards, including the IIHS Top Safety Pick for 2012.

Now is the time to buy your new minivan, before the summer vacation season really ramps up. So visit Chrysler.com for information about the right 2012 Chrysler Town & Country for you and your family and head on over to your local Chrysler dealer to test drive the “Most Awarded Minivan Ever.”

*vehicle shown is 2012 Chrysler Town & Country Limited

As read on: http://blog.chrysler.com/vehicles/town-country/value-safety-luxury-the-2012-chrysler-town-country/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_campaign=KMMay0812Facebook1&ism=KMMay0812Facebook1