Archive for the ‘renegade’ Tag

Nissan Juke Vs. Jeep Renegade: Compare Cars

Believe it or not, the Jeep Renegade and Nissan Juke are in the same category of small SUVs. But they could hardly be more different. The Renegade is Jeep’s littlest SUV, with square-cut styling and genuine off-road prowess. The Juke, on the other hand, is a style-first urban warrior whose all-wheel-drive option is more for on-road traction than anything even in the neighborhood of rocky trails or mountain climbing.

New in 2015, the Renegade is the first vehicle developed from the ground up for global sale by the combined Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. While it’ll likely sell well in North America, its minimal dimensions make it best-suited to bring the Jeep brand to more crowded and less affluent markets in Europe, Asia, and South America. Its design is every inch classic SUV, with oversize lights and other details for visual interest.
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The interior is straightforward, modern, and contains a number of Jeep-brand reminders in the form of “Easter Egg” design elements. The Renegade’s front seats are comfortable, but there’s not that much room in the rear unless rear-seat riders bargain aggressively with those in the front. The seats are comfortable and nicely bolstered, and the Renegade is clearly wider than other AWD entries, meaning the shoulders of the two front-seat riders are suitably separated.

The Juke, on the other hand, has been with us since the 2011 model year. Its wild-style design is polarizing: You either love for it for its in-your-face, tall, haunched, bug-eyed appearance or hate it for the same reasons. A light restyle for 2015 has made it, if anything, even more mean-looking. The Juke’s layout and switchgear are straightforward even if the motorcycle-inspired gauges, shiny nylon upholstery, and colorful inserts give it far more design edge.

Interior space is adequate in the front, with a somewhat upright seating position, but quite cramped in the rear–and the Juke has less cargo space to boot, just 36 cubic feet with the rear seat folded down (which is how we expect most Jukes will be driven), against 51 cubic feet for the Renegade. In the end, the Jeep is simply far better at the utility jobs that many people need: hauling people and stuff.

The Jeep Renegade comes with two powertrain options. The base model is propelled by a 160-horsepower turbocharged 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine paired with a six-speed manual gearbox. If you don’t want to shift for yourself, you’ll move up to the 180-hp 2.4-liter four, which uses the new nine-speed automatic transmission that’s increasingly common in new Chrysler, Jeep, and Fiat products. Front-wheel drive is standard, with all-wheel drive optional for both engines.

The Nissan Juke is powered by a 188-hp, 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with either front- or all-wheel drive, and a continuously variable (CVT) transmission. The CVT makes it somewhat sluggish around town unless you drive it hard, when it tightens up and offers more fun. Performance fans, however, will go for the Juke NISMO or NISMO RS—both offering a manual gearbox. The NISMO RS gets a top-performance version of the same engine, boosted to 215 hp. The NISMO versions also get more than 100 upgrades to suit their hot-hatch personae.

While the NISMOs are in a separate category–they’re smaller competitors to cars like the Subaru WRX and VW Golf GTI–the conventional Juke powertrain just isn’t as direct or enjoyable to drive as the Jeep’s pair. Not to mention that the AWD Juke gave us truly atrocious fuel economy during a test several years ago–only slightly more than 20 mpg.

The Juke’s safety ratings are mixed–not unexpected for an older design–while the Renegade hasn’t yet been rated for crash safety by either the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

The 2015 Renegade comes in four trim levels: the base Sport (starting at $18,990 for the base 2WD version), the mid-level Latitude ($22,290), and the top-of-the-line Limited ($25,790). All-wheel drive is a $2,000 option. Then there’s the Trailhawk model ($26,990) with its greater off-road capability, which only comes with all-wheel drive and the larger 2.4-liter engine with the nine-speed automatic. All prices above include the mandatory $995 delivery fee.

The 2015 Juke starts at $21,705 and rises to more than $30,000 for a top-spec NISMO model. Even the base Juke S includes Intelligent Key with push-button start, a backup camera, and the NissanConnect system with Mobile Apps and a text message assistant. The mid-range Juke SV adds a moonroof; a rearview camera system; push-button start; satellite radio; the I-CON system; automatic temperature control; and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. The top-trim Juke (other than NISMO models) is the SL, which layers on navigation; leather-trimmed seats; and an 8-inch Rockford Fosgate subwoofer with six upgraded speakers.

Overall, the Jeep Renegade easily gets the nod here. When the Juke was the sole hot-hatch SUV on the market, it was a new and interesting way to get that capability in a smaller size than the usual compact crossover. But now that we have entries from not only Jeep but also Chevy, Fiat, and even Buick, the Juke comes up short: It’s too small and cramped, and doesn’t offer the sturdy off-roading ability of the littlest Jeep.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1098188_nissan-juke-vs-jeep-renegade-compare-cars?fbfanpage

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More praise for Jeeps and Durango

Car & Driver recently compared SUVs in two categories: Mid-Size Crossovers and SUVs and 3-row Crossovers and SUVs.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee, which has won more awards than any other SUV, bested the Dodge Journey, Volkswagen Touareg, Toyota 4Runner, Nissan XTerra, Kia Sorento, Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, Nissan Murano and Ford Edge in the mid-size SUV class.

Car & Driver’s editors said: “Whether you want to climb a mountain or just move up the ladder of success, the Grand Cherokee has you covered. With a choice of four 4×4 systems plus an optional Quadra-Lift air suspension, there’s no obstacle too difficult to tackle.”

In the 3-row category, the Dodge Durango was judged the best of the bunch. It beat the Mitsubishi Outlander, Nissan Pathfinder (which is being discontinued), Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia, Buick Enclave, Ford Flex, Toyota Highlander, Mazda CX-9, Hyundai Santa Fe, Ford Explorer and Honda Pilot.

“The Durango remains big, brawny, and masculine in an era of soft, curvaceous crossovers, but it’s not as trucklike as other large sport-utes…The V-6 models are enough for most, with smooth acceleration, while Hemi models deliver excellent torque, especially handy for towing.”

In Great Britain, the Jeep Renegade was named 4×4 Magazine’s “4×4 of the Year.” The decision by the magazine’s expert judges was unanimous and followed a tough off-road evaluation course. Those doing the testing also said the entire Renegade lineup was worthy of the top award.

“It’s a credit that any manufacturer should consider producing such a capable small off-roader,” says Nigel Fryatt, Editor, 4×4 Magazine. “That it’s so well built, while also fun and funky, is a delight.’

The Renegade also won the magazine’s “Mid-range SUV sub-£30,000 (~$45,600)” category while the Wrangler took the “Hardcore” class for the fourth consecutive year.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/12/more-praise-for-jeeps-and-durango-30779

SEVEN MUST-SEE FEATURES ON THE ALL-NEW 2015 JEEP® RENEGADE

The All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade is writing the book on style and performance for a small SUV. Designed with all the capability you’ve come to expect from the Jeep brand, the Jeep Renegade is an all-purpose vehicle that’s both city-friendly and equipped for off-road performance.

We built the Jeep Renegade from the ground up with iconic Jeep styling and capability, as well as impressive, class-exclusive features that make the most capable small SUV* ever one of the most exciting to drive. Throw away your maps and prepare to chart new courses; here are seven must-see features that set the Jeep Renegade apart.

1. Meet any challenge: The Jeep Renegade is designed for any road — or off-road — conditions, and built to perform. The class-exclusive available Select-Terrain Dial† with Auto, Snow, Sand and Mud settings, as well as an additional Rock setting on Jeep Renegade Trailhawk® models, lends added control and capability when you’re navigating the elements.

2. Let in the sun: The open road is best experienced in the open air and sunshine. If you’re looking for freedom, look no further than the class-exclusive available My Sky® open-air roof†. The secure panels are fully lockable when in place, and can be removed and stored flat in a height-adjustable rear cargo area, giving you the ability to adjust as the weather changes. The My Sky® dual-panel roof is just one of the reasons the All-New 2015 Jeep Renegade was named one of Ward’s 10 Best Interiors for 2015.

3. Shift into convenience: The All-New 2015 Jeep Renegade features a class-exclusive available nine-speed automatic transmission† that allows you to focus on the road ahead and enjoy the scenery, while also providing remarkable efficiency and virtually unnoticeable shifts between gears. A vinyl shift knob adds style and comfort when driving.

4. See the light: When you’re exploring new trails, you’re bound to encounter unexpected conditions and challenges. With class-exclusive available cornering fog lamps†, you’ll be prepared for whatever Mother Nature throws your way. Halogen cornering fog lamps — standard on Latitude, Limited and Trailhawk models — help improve visibility during heavy fog, rain or snow. Flip on the lights and start your adventure.

5. Legendary off-road performance: The All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade Trailhawk proudly wears the Trail Rated® badge, and is part of a Jeep brand tradition of legendary off-road performance. The Jeep Renegade is ready to go off the beaten path with best-in-class 4×4 capability† and two available systems: Jeep Active Drive on Sport, Latitude and Limited models, and Jeep Active Drive Low on Trailhawk models. Both systems feature a rear axle disconnect system that seamlessly switches between two- and four-wheel drive to help increase efficiency and on- and off-road performance.

6. Stay connected: However far you venture, you’ll always stay connected to your favorite entertainment with the available Uconnect® 6.5 System. SiriusXM® Premier offers more than 160 channels of your favorite music and talk radio, and integrated Uconnect® Voice Command and Bluetooth® offers hands-free calling and voice texting** for an added level of connectedness. The vivid 6.5-inch touchscreen display makes controlling your entertainment convenient when you’re on the move. And available GPS navigation is perfect for adventurers who are mapping trails on the go and forging new roads. Additional features include AM/FM radio, Aux/USB Media Hub with iPod® mobile device integration, and speed-adjusted volume.

7. Comfortable, spacious interior: The All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade is a small SUV with a big interior. For added convenience, particularly on the long treks into the wilderness, the best-in-class interior volume† offers comfort and storage, with over 118 cubic feet of space, including over 50 cubic feet of best-in-class rear cargo space with seats folded down‡. And to keep passengers and drivers warm on those cool mountain mornings, the Jeep Renegade features an available heated steering wheel and available dual-zone automatic climate control.

Whether your next adventure is in the city or under the stars, the All-New 2015 Jeep® Renegade combines classic Jeep brand styling, 4×4 capability, efficiency and open-air freedom. The possibilities are endless in an award-winning SUV that’s redefining versatility and performance for a new generation of adventure-seekers with dynamic, energetic personalities.

Read more at: http://blog.jeep.com/news/seven-must-see-features-on-the-all-new-2015-jeep-renegade/

Renegade, 300 on Ward’s “Best Interior” list

Ward’s Auto has added the Jeep Renegade Limited to its “Ten Best Interiors List” for 2015.

The Renegade was one of two Chrysler-brand vehicles to make list: the other was the new Chrysler 300 Platinum.

Drew Winter, Editor-in-Chief of Ward’s Autoworld magazine, said:

“The interior checks off all our boxes in terms of being roomy, comfortable and having excellent ergonomics — even the voice-activation system works flawlessly. But, the attention given to interior details and design is truly spectacular for a vehicle in this class. Whimsical design elements, bold, contrasting colors and stunning metallic bronze trim convey a sense of fun and adventure that sets it apart. The Renegade isn’t a ’cute ute,’ it’s the Cherokee’s badass little brother.”

Ward’s Auto editors spent two months evaluating and judging 42 vehicles. Scoring was based on a wide variety of factors including fit-and-finish, comfort, material selection, ergonomics, information/displays, value, safety and overall design aesthetics.

At $33,205, the Renegade Limited was one of the least-expensive vehicles on the list. Only the Honda Fit EX-L had a lower sticker.

Last month, the editors of Kelley Blue Book‘s kbb.com said the Renegade was one of their “10 Favorite New-for-2015 Cars” and “10 Best All-Wheel-Drive Vehicles Under $25,000.”

Chrysler’s new top-level Platinum interior also received high praise from Winter:

“In a world overpopulated with giant SUVs, the Chrysler 300C Platinum reminds us how glorious big sedans can be. The ’15 model takes the superb interior of the previous version up another notch with even more features, comfort and sumptuous materials. The quilted leather trim and patterned upholstery are similar to what we see on German luxury sedans costing three times as much. The huge touchscreen and Uconnect infotainment system is about the best at any price. Yet it also has wonderfully practical details, such as stout grab handles and a truly sturdy sunglasses holder. ‘I could live in this car,’ says one judge. Yes indeed. And live well,”

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/04/renegade-300-on-wards-best-interior-list-28436

2015 Jeep Renegade First Drive & Review

Jeep had paraded the ’15 Renegade and Renegade Trailhawk in front of journalists and the general public for over a year. We snickered at it, leered at it, touched it, and even sat in it during that time. The new Jeep really began to pique our interest, though. Was it a real Jeep, or was it simply a rebodied all-wheel-drive Fiat 500L? To find out, we jumped at the chance to get behind the wheel and test drive the Jeep Renegade Latitude 4×4, Limited 4×4, and the top-tier Trailhawk 4×4. Sport and 4×2 models are also available. Our review took us over the streets and freeways, as well as in the hills and mountains, near San Jose, California. First and foremost, if you’re a Jeep enthusiast who’s into lift kits, oversized tires, and boulders larger than bowling balls, stop reading. Traditional off-road Jeep fanboys and fangirls scoff at any 4×4 that doesn’t have a ladder frame or at least solid axles front and rear and for good reason. These heavy-duty components are some of the last bits leftover from when the first Jeep rolled off of the assembly line over 70 years ago. But, a company like Jeep can’t survive in today’s competitive automotive marketplace by building only Wranglers. New segments are needed to broaden the brand’s appeal and bring in new customers looking for on- and off-road capability and efficiency to the tune of more than 30 mpg. And that is exactly what the ’15 Jeep Renegade is designed to deliver.

With an open mind, it’s hard to not like the sporty and fun-looking Renegade when inspecting the exterior. The round headlights, seven-slot grill, trapezoidal wheel openings, and overall utilitarian feel of the Renegade set it apart from the other seemingly more sophisticated, and frankly boring, vehicle lineup in the compact-SUV segment. By comparison, the Jeep Renegade is that unconventionally amusing uncle, the one that let you light fireworks in the house and shoot beer bottles in the backyard. We appreciate that the Renegade puts a smile on our face, even when it’s simply parked.

The interior of the Limited and Trailhawk models we drove were quite plush and felt similar to what you would see in a top-tier Cherokee or Grand Cherokee. We appreciated the use of soft-touch materials in places where other manufacturers might use less-impressive hard plastic. The Renegade is available absolutely stuffed with technology. Some of our favorite features include the built-in on-demand Wi-Fi hotspot capability and an available mobile phone app, which enables owners to start their Jeep and lock or unlock doors from their cell phones. The instrumentation is easy to read and most controls are intuitive in their operation. We absolutely love the split HVAC system and the real numbers on the adjustment knob, instead of an ambiguous blue and red line designed specifically to mock us while we incessantly fumble for a comfortable temperature.

We tested both the 1.4L MultiAir Turbo and the 2.4L Tigershark MultiAir2 engines on-road. The six-speed manual used behind the 1.4L is a sporty, quick-shifting transmission. It takes no time at all to learn where the forward gears are and manipulate the clutch effectively. Shifting into Reverse requires that you lift up on the shift ring, similar to the shifter you might find in a sandrail or VW Baja Bug but much easier to engage. The 160hp 1.4L punches out 184 lb-ft of torque. You can keep busy shifting in the mountain twists or you can simply rev the engine to the moon by selecting the proper gear. Both options are fun. The naturally aspirated 2.4L produces 180hp and 175 lb-ft of torque. This engine is coupled to the nine-speed automatic, which can be just as fun to drive as the six-speed when toggled through the gears manually. Overall, the Jeep Renegade handles crisply and is extremely confidence-inspiring on-road.

Of course it wouldn’t be a Jeep if it didn’t go off-road. Nothing else currently in the vehicle segment even compares to the off-road capability of the Jeep Renegade Trailhawk. It has some off-road features, such as the large accessible bright red tow hooks, 20:1 crawl ratio, and Selec-Terrain traction system that we wish were on other vehicles considered to be more trail worthy by many 4×4 enthusiasts. Interestingly enough, the Renegade Trailhawk even has better approach, departure, and breakover angles than a Cherokee Trailhawk. An extracurricular off-road adventure took us to the sand dunes and rocky mountain trails in southern California. We were pleasantly surprised at how far up the trail we could take the Renegade Trailhawk, almost to the point of feeling guilty, while wondering “Should we be here in this?” It drives like a maneuverable side-by-side UTV. Rather than being forced to climb over rocks, ledges, and other trail obstacles, you can simply steer around them with ease if you choose.

The ’15 Jeep Renegade is not a Wrangler, and it shouldn’t be. Most new Jeeps never even go off-road. Think of it like this: without the success of the Renegade, the current Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee, the Wrangler would not exist, and neither would the Jeep brand. As a Jeep enthusiast you don’t have to buy these new Jeeps or even like them, but you should thank someone that does. Ultimately, all Jeeps, including the ’15 Renegade, are offered in a model that is still best in class for off-road capability, and that’s really what the Jeep brand is all about, right?

Read more at: http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/research/2015-jeep-renegade-first-drive-and-review/ar-AAaXXEg

Compass: “Honey, I shrunk the Grand Cherokee!”

Today, artist SuzyQ044 provided a rendering of the coming Jeep Compass, following Allpar sources’ claims that it will look like a 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee shrunk down to Jeep Renegade size.

We have been told by insiders that the coming “MP” Compass will share its underpinnings and drivetrain with the just-released Renegade. The cars are so close that Compass mules are reportedly out and about, except that you cannot tell that is what they are as they are all cleverly disguised as Renegades.

One insider said the rendering was close, but to make it even more Grand Cherokee-like.

The Compass name itself has not been confirmed, but does not appear to carry enough baggage (or connotations that could be an issue in a worldwide car) to justify a name change.

Theoretically, it could be built at any of the three Renegade/500x plants in the world (Italy, Brazil and China), but it could make more sense for to be domestically produced. If that happens, could the Renegade also find a domestic production line? There is room at the old 200 plant at Sterling Heights, at Toluca in Mexico, and, once the current Compass and Patriot stop, at Belvedere. The question is, which cars can be built on the same lines as each other — and which plants are ready for it?

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/03/compass-honey-i-shrunk-the-grand-cherokee-28086

How We’d Spec It: Yes, Basic Jeep Wranglers Still Exist in 2015

In light of Jeep’s recent forays into crossover-dom—see the Renegade and Cherokee, please—we’ve been hit hard with nostalgia for the brand’s good ol’ days. You know, the ones filled with solid axles, real four-wheel drive with low-range gearing, and manly stick-shift transmissions. So we moseyed over to Jeep’s online configurator to start building out a Wrangler, only to remember that, holy crap, the things are expensive. (Oh, and they’re huge.) That’s okay, our ideal Wrangler isn’t some gussied-up, $40,000 toy—it’s a beastly, featureless stripper model, and thanks to Jeep’s addition of a sweet new off-road tire option to the base Sport for 2015, that fantasy can once again be had for relatively little money. This is how we’d spec a Wrangler:

MODEL:

Jeep Sport Two-Door Manual 4×4 (base price: $23,790)

There are no fewer than 9 different Wrangler trim levels, two body styles, and—on most models—the choice of a manual or an automatic transmission. With the top-level, four-door Unlimited Rubicon Hard Rock pushing $40,990, and even milder versions like the sweet-looking Willys Wheeler running between $27,790 and $31,590, we needed to stay toward the bottom of the pile to satiate our base-model fetish. It doesn’t get more basic than the Sport, which starts at $23,790 and comes with steel wheels, crank windows, manual door locks, manual door mirrors, manual seats, a heater, Dana axles, four-wheel drive, four-wheel disc brakes, a six-speed manual transmission, fog lights, and a folding soft top.

Air conditioning is optional, as is Bluetooth, a hardtop, and satellite radio. The interior is washable—there are drain plugs in the floor for evacuating water—and although there are wisps of decadence in the standard cruise control, steering-wheel audio controls, eight-speaker audio system, and the 284-hp Pentastar V-6, this is as stripped as Jeeps come.

OPTIONS:

Sunset Orange Pearl paint ($0)

Air conditioning bypass ($0)

Half metal doors with manual locks ($0)

Black Steel and 31-inch Dueler Tire Package ($995) (regular rims get 225/75R16 on/off road; black package brings 245/75R16)

Connectivity Group ($570)

As you might have noticed, our first three selected options are all no-cost. Free stuff is always good, but in the case of our dream Wrangler, it’s less a case of free stuff and more of a case of not paying money for things. For example, the paint is free, so we picked the brightest color we could find: Sunset Orange Pearl. Next, we chose not to add air conditioning for $1295; gotta love Jeep, the company actually has an option box for “air conditioning bypass,” which is really just a fancy way of saying “summer’s gonna be hot.” (Take off the roof and cruise, we say!) Finally, we shelled out zero smackers for half-metal doors with removable plastic side windows (not pictured above), which replace the standard full-metal doors and make top-down excursions feel even more open and more fun.

Now for the stuff we actually had to pay for. We’re fans of steel wheels, but the Wrangler’s standard steel-wheel/tire combo is a bit weak-looking. The tires are street-oriented and skinny, while the steelies are a boring shade of silver. Thankfully, Jeep introduced the $995 Black Steel and 31-inch Dueler Tire Package for 2015, which includes meatier, 31-inch Bridgestone Dueler white-letter tires and the base Wrangler’s same steel wheels—only they’re painted black. Sweet. Vanity and enhanced off-road capability taken care of, the only option left (to us—Jeep offers many more, including different axle ratios, hardtops, a towing package, and even an automatic transmission) was the $570 Connectivity Group that brings functional upgrades such as a tire-pressure-monitor display, Uconnect voice recognition, Bluetooth, and what Jeep calls an “electronic vehicle information center.”

Would we consider $25,550 “cheap?” Not exactly, but in today’s Jeep Wrangler landscape, it’s a steal. And besides, to most folks, a Jeep looks like, well, a Jeep—no matter if it is a back-to-basics Luddite like our Wrangler Sport or a fully loaded Rubicon. We almost don’t want a nice Wrangler, because then we’d have reservations about scratching its body-color fender flares on brush or soiling its leather interior with mud or snow. A Sport, on the other hand, is ready to be grabbed by the scruff of its neck—or its padded roll bar—and tossed down the nearest off-road trail without stress. Yep, basic Jeeps still exist, but they’re getting harder to find; we hope Jeep can keep some of that stripper spirit alive in the next Wrangler coming out in 2017.

As read on: http://blog.caranddriver.com/how-wed-spec-it-yes-basic-jeep-wranglers-still-exist-in-2015/

The configurator tool on Jeep.com now includes the 2015 Renegade, providing every detail on pricing for the sporty little SUV. We brought you the basic pricing when it was announced at the media first drive two weeks back, but with the arrival of the “build your own” option on the Jeep website, we know exactly how much it will cost you to buy your ideal 2015 Renegade.

The destination charge, not included in the prices below, is $995 in the 48 states, across the board. All but Trailhawk are front wheel drive, with AWD being a $2,000 option.
First up is the Renegade Sport; it includes your choice of two black or black-and-sandstorm interiors and nine paints (white, black, Colorado Red, Commando, Glacier Metallic, Mojave Sand, Omaha Orange, Sierra Blue, and Solar Yellow).
The 1.4L turbocharged 4-cylinder mated to the 6-speed manual transmission is standard, but opting up to the 2.4L 4-cylinder and the 9-speed automatic transmission on either the FWD or AWD Renegade Sport raises the price by $1,200.

Standalone options for the Jeep Renegade Sport include a backup camera ($195), 16 inch aluminum wheels instead of the 16 inch steel wheels ($595), black side roof rails ($195), a full size spare tire ($195), and the MySky fixed removable roof system ($1,095).
Option packages include the $695 Sound Group, which adds a five inch touchscreen, 6 speakers, a GPS antenna, integrated voice controls with Bluetooth, a remote USB port, Sirius satellite radio and the UConnect 5.0 system while the $1,495 Power and Air Group adds Air Conditioning, Power Heated Mirrors and cruise control.

The 2015 Jeep Renegade Latitude starts at $21,295; upgrading from the base manual/1.4 engine to the automatic/2.4 costs $1,400, but includes 17 inch aluminum wheels. Colors are the same except for one more interior skin, “Bark Brown and Ski Gray.”

Standalone options for the Renegade Latitude include the interior tonneau cover ($75), remote start ($200), keyless entry ($295), navigation ($1,245), 18 inch aluminum wheels ($595), a full size spare ($195), a black painted roof ($495), the MySky fixed removable roof ($1,095) and the MySky retracting roof ($1,395).

There are four option packages for the 2015 Renegade Latitude. The $545 Cold Weather Group adds heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, a windshield wiper de-icer and floor mats. The $595 Safety and Security Group includes Blind Spot and Cross Path Detection and a Security Alarm. The $795 Popular Equipment Group adds a 115 volt power outlet, a 40/20/40 split rear seat, 9 amplified speakers with a suibwoofer, dual zone climate control and 8-way power driver’s seat control with a 4-way manual passenger’s seat. The $995 Advanced Technology Group adds Forward Collision Warning, Lane Departure, and rear parking assistance. Finally the Trailer Tow package, available only on AWD cars, adds $495 to the final price.

Buyers who want more luxury can opt for the Renegade Limited, which starts at $24,795, with a standard 2.4L engine and 9-speed automatic. There are two interior options, both leather: black, and Bark Brown and Ski Gray. Colors are white, black, Colorado Red, Commando, Glacier Metallic, Mojave Sand, and Sierra Blue.

Standalone interior options for the 2015 Renegade Limited include the tonneau ($75), keyless entry ($295), a 9-speaker system with a subwoofer ($495) and navigation ($1,245), while exterior options include 18 inch polished aluminum wheels, ($395), a full size spare ($195) and the MySky retracting roof ($1,395).

The Renegade Limited is so heavily appointed in standard form that there are only three option packages, the Safety and Security Group, the Advanced Technology Group, and the Trailer Tow Package (4WD only). Safety and Security costs $595 and adds Keyless Entry and Remote Start, while the Advanced Technology packages costs $995 and includes Forward Collision Warning, Lane Departure. and the ParkSense rear parking assist system. Finally, the Trailer Tow package, for AWD only, adds $495 to the final price.

The package for those who want off-road prowess is Renegade Trailhawk, starting at $25,995 including AWD, 2.4L engine, and 9-speed automatic transmission. It only comes with black interiors, but has all nine exterior colors offered, including a unique Anvil.

Standalone options are the tonneau ($75), remote start ($200), keyless entry ($295), 9 amplified speakers with a subwoofer ($495), and navigation ($1,245). Standalone exterior options include the black hood decal ($150) the fixed MySky roof ($1,095) and the retractable MySky roof ($1,395).

Renegade Trailhawk has five option packages. The first is the $395 Trailer Tow Group which adds a hitch receiver along with a 4-pin and 7-pin harness plug assembly. Next is the Cold Weather Group which costs $495 and adds heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, and a windshield wiper de-icer system. The $595 Safety and Security Group adds Blind Spot and Cross Path Detection and a security alarm. The $745 Popular Equipment Group for the Renegade Trailhawk adds a 40/20/40 split rear seat, the 9-speaker system, dual zone climate control, and an 8-way power driver’s seat with 4-way lumbar adjustment.

Finally, for 2015 Renegade Trailhawk buyers who want their off-road read beast to be as luxurious as possible, we have the $1,495 Trailhawk Premium Group. This adds black leather seats, the 40/20/40 split rear seat, dual zone climate control, heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, the power driver’s seat and the windshield wiper de-icer. The Trailhawk Premium package also comes with the Remote Start and Keyless Entry systems, adding on another $495 and effectively bringing the price of this top of the line option package to $1,990.

Read the full article on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/full-pricing-for-the-jeep-renegade