Archive for the ‘Ram Heavy Duty’ Tag

Black is the new black

Some Web sages noticed that the only interior color available for the Ram Rebel and Laramie Limited was black (this has been true for both generations of Laramie Limited).  With the 2015 Ram 1500 Laramie Limited, even the headliner and pillars are black.

We asked Ram lead interior designer whether this was due to customer choice or cost, and he said it was partly a matter of being appropriate to the vehicle.

There’s just something about wearing a black suit, just a nice black suit, that your details pop.  I think that’s the thing that we’ve learned over the years, that it’s okay to have a very calming black, very consistent, and then accent it with colors. That’s what we’ve chosen for like you mentioned the Limited; we’ve chosen it for the Rebel that we’re sitting in. It’s appropriate.

Mr. Nagode also mentioned the dirt resistance (to fingerprints) in truck use, as well as customer choice if presented with different options at a lot. However, he also noted that for other vehicles, different colors were more appropriate, particularly in cars such as Charger, Challenger, and Viper. The Laramie Longhorn, he pointed out, comes in either black with brown seats, or in “a frost color” with a warmer brown.

It’s just sometimes the extremes, we tend to kind of limit the choices. Like our Express and Tradesman really only comes in a black environment. And again, that’s perfect for someone that’s going to get it dirty.  …  At the core of our market, we tend to offer more colors, more variations.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/black-is-the-new-black

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Siberian-style cold for Ram tests

Houghton Michigan, not a place many of us might be familiar with, but the Ram cold weather group is rather freezingly acquainted with the town.

Houghton is where Ram conducts some of its severe duty cold weather testing, and they just released a video showing what some of the cold weather testing entails. Houghton sees an average of 260 inches of snow each year, and combined with the bitter cold of this winter, has allowed Ram to put its trucks through even more rigorous than normal testing.

The company does have simulated cold weather facilities, including both “chill rooms” and a snowblower/wind tunnel to see if driving through thick snow will clog the air intakes or completely block visibility.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/siberian-style-cold-for-ram-tests

Standard Features of the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon

By now you’ve seen the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon. You know it’s got unmatched off-road capability, and you may have even seen it in action. Whether you’re familiar with the Power Wagon’s capabilities or just starting to check it out, here are a few features you’ll be glad to know come standard.

Electric Winch

That’s right, the winch is standard. So if you’re taking your Power Wagon out for some off-road fun or need to rescue “the other guys” from a stuck situation, you’ll find yourself well equipped in the Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon. The Warn 12,000-pound winch is mounted right behind the front bumper, so you can pull up to the scene and save the day … and prove just how powerful your Ram Truck really is.

Front Disconnecting Stabilizer Bar

If you’re in the market for an off-road vehicle, we know you’ll want to be pushing it to the limits. That’s why the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon also comes standard with the unique Ram Articulink front suspension system. High movement joints and the sway bar disconnecting system give you increased control over your axels, so you anticipate bumps in the road with excitement, not dread.

Electronic Lock Differentials

Why go the four-by-four route if you aren’t going to go 100%? Front and rear electronic-locking differentials come standard on every Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon to give it true four-wheel drive and maximum traction. You’ll be in control every bit of the way.

Of course, this isn’t all the Power Wagon has to offer. You know it comes with a 6.4-liter HEMI® V-8 with best-in-class 410 horsepower and 429 lb.-ft. of torque … all this featuring an unsurpassed powertrain warranty of five years or 100,000 miles. Equip it with a Ram Box, and you’ll be the envy of every other truck on (or off) the road.

Read more at: http://blog.ramtrucks.com/features/standard-features-2014-ram-heavy-duty-power-wagon/

Ram Snatches Truck Torque Crown with 865-lb-ft Cummins Diesel for 2015

Ford threw down the gauntlet last year with the revelation that its 2015 Super Duty pickups would produce 440 hp and 860 lb-ft of torque, yet we knew it wouldn’t be long before one of the other domestic brands launched a volley of its own in the heavy-duty pickup war. 

It turns out the honor goes to Ram, as it’s shouting from the mountaintop—a mountaintop that one of its trucks tugged into an aesthetically pleasing position, natch—that the turbo-diesel Cummins inline-six will pack 865 lb-ft of torque for 2015. Yes, that’s a full 5 lb-ft more than Ford’s Power Stroke V-8. You’ll feel it off the line.
Ram is also touting another 70 pounds of payload capacity for its regular-cab dualie Ram 3500. It can now haul a class-leading 7390 pounds, topping the Ford’s 7260-pound max despite the latter’s shady mathematical practices that involve calculating the payload rating by stripping off or substituting standard parts such as bumpers and wheels. The Ram 3500 also barely tops, by a bag of potting soil or so, the Chevy Silverado’s 7374-pound max-payload rating. But the thin victories for Ram are nevertheless huge in the pickup game, where bragging rights are incredibly important marketing tools.

Ram still trounces all non-commercial-grade comers with its 30,000-pound fifth-wheel tow rating for its 3500-grade truck, besting the F-350 Super Duty by 3300 pounds and the Chevrolet Silverado HD by 6800 pounds, and it does so, Ram says, while fully complying with SAE J2807 testing criteria. For its 2500 pickup, Ram also claims a best-in-class towing capacity of 17,970 pounds.

As read on: http://blog.caranddriver.com/do-all-of-the-twist-ram-snatches-truck-torque-crown-with-865-lb-ft-cummins-diesel-for-2015/

2014 Ram 2500 and 3500 Diesel Review

Twenty-five years ago, the first diesel-equipped Dodge Ram pickup went on sale. Then, twenty years ago, Dodge made the pickup world sit up and take notice with the 1994 Dodge Ram pickup; its big-truck styling, thoughtful cabin, and generally state-of-the-art design transformed an also-ran model with a 7% share into a major player, with an 18.5% share at the end of August 2013. Significantly, from the crash in 2009 to the end of 2012, Ram achieved the highest growth of any American pickup.

For 2014, these trends converged as Ram became the only American full-size pickup line with diesel engines across its entire range.

A group from the Texas Auto Writers Association met the newest Rams on a hazy morning at Ventura Farms in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains about 43 miles northwest of Los Angeles. They were all there: the new Ram 1500 with the 3.0-liter EcoDiesel engine; the new 2500 with the five-link coil suspension; the 3500 with a demonstration version of supplemental load-leveling air suspension, and an assortment of ProMaster commercial vans.

The event kicked off with presentations of the new technologies. The keynote speaker was Ram CEO Reid Bigland, whose speech was liberally sprinkled with the phrase “best-in-class.”

Kevin Mets, head of Ram Heavy Duty Pickup Engineering and Greg Corey, from Ram Power Engineering, gave us a briefing on the new technologies, including watching a pre-production prototype of the big Ram’s suspension. A Ram 3500 was hooked up to a gooseneck trailer loaded with a 19,841-pound Case-IH 140 tractor. A pole with a moving arrow showed the height of the rear wheel opening. As the trailer’s landing gear was retraced, the arrow moved down as the truck took on the load. The new air suspension kicked in and the arrow slowly moved back up to its original position.

While diesels and new suspensions took most of the limelight, Kevin Mets introduced the new truck-specific 6.4-liter HEMI engine. In addition to best-in-class 410 horsepower and 400 lb-ft of torque, the new engine can be equipped with dual alternators to support heavy electrical loads.

After the briefing, it was time to pick a truck and head out. I picked a Ram 2500 4×4 with a manual transmission and fewer bells and whistles. Kimberly Shults, the Chrysler Communications rep for the Southwest Region, came along as the navigator.

I have often wished that manufacturers would offer more “real world” vehicles in their media fleets, especially in trucks that are more likely to be purchased for their work capabilities than the level of bling. The company seemed to agree: the Ram 2500 was set up as a fleet buyer might take it. Even without the extras, the Ram 2500 was very comfortable and the coil suspension worked exactly as advertised, delivering a ride superior to light-duty trucks from Ford and GM, including the new 2014 Silverado.

To test handling and maneuverability, we headed out on Protero Road to Westlake Boulevard, a boulevard in name only. Westlake is a narrow road with no shoulders, but enough twists and turns to give a snake a conniption fit. It heads up a mountainside and then comes back down, where we picked up Mulholland Highway, another twisty two-lane with delusions of grandeur.  Even when the lanes narrowed down to being barely wide enough for the exterior mirrors, the Ram was able to stay in-lane through the turns.

If you’re going to take a big truck up a mountain, it would be hard to beat that silver Ram 2500. The Cummins diesel provided plenty of power and the smooth-shifting six-speed made the nearly constant gear changes easy; it had a fine clutch feel despite the high torque.

Seating was comfortable enough for a solid day’s driving; supportive without being too firm. Truck seats have come a long way since the last pickup I owned.

Mulholland Highway deposited us on the Pacific Coast Highway, a real highway this time, where we paused at one of California’s many beaches to stretch our legs, take some photos and change drivers. The return route to Ventura Farms was less dramatic and we enjoyed a comfortable ride.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/reviews/14/ram-3500.html

Ram diesel trucks “most durable;” 25 years of Cummins

Given the reputation of Cummins as a maker of bullet-proof diesel engines, it is hard to be surprised by Ram’s announcement today that their Cummins-powered trucks are Canada’s most durable diesel pickups.

The first Cummins-powered light-duty pickups (confusing called “heavy duty” or “super duty” by GM, Chrysler, and Ford) appeared in 1989, immediately boosting Dodge pickup sales. The current version of the Cummins B-series engine is far more powerful than in those early days, and has increased in displacement from 5.9 to 6.7 liters; they now produce up to 385 horsepower and 850 lb-ft of torque, more than any competitor.

Ram chassis cabs with the Cummins diesel reach 37,500 lb of gross combined weight ratings; the Ram Heavy Duty has a class-leading 30,000 lb of towing capacity. The engine is the only one shared by heavy equipment and light-duty pickup trucks; it uses an iron head (rather than aluminum), with 30%-40% fewer moving components than competitors.

Ram uses three versions of the engine; the first is paired with a segment-exclusive six-speed manual transmission, which has  a wear-compensating clutch. The diesel is rated at 350 horsepower at 2,800 rpm and 660 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,400 rpm with this transmission. Coupled to the 68RFE six-speed automatic transmission, it is rated at 370 horsepower at 2,800 rpm with an unsurpassed in ¾-ton trucks 800 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,600 rpm. Finally, with the Aisin wide-ratio six-speed automatic transmission (AS69RC), the Cummins is rated at 385 horsepower at 2,800 rpm, with best-in-class torque of 850 lb.-ft. at 1,700 rpm.

The “most durable” claim comes from a study showing the percentage of Canadian diesel pickups sold within the last 20 years that are still on the road, by brand.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/02/ram-diesel-trucks-most-durable-25-years-of-cummins

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