Archive for the ‘off-road’ Tag

Standard Features of the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon

By now you’ve seen the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon. You know it’s got unmatched off-road capability, and you may have even seen it in action. Whether you’re familiar with the Power Wagon’s capabilities or just starting to check it out, here are a few features you’ll be glad to know come standard.

Electric Winch

That’s right, the winch is standard. So if you’re taking your Power Wagon out for some off-road fun or need to rescue “the other guys” from a stuck situation, you’ll find yourself well equipped in the Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon. The Warn 12,000-pound winch is mounted right behind the front bumper, so you can pull up to the scene and save the day … and prove just how powerful your Ram Truck really is.

Front Disconnecting Stabilizer Bar

If you’re in the market for an off-road vehicle, we know you’ll want to be pushing it to the limits. That’s why the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon also comes standard with the unique Ram Articulink front suspension system. High movement joints and the sway bar disconnecting system give you increased control over your axels, so you anticipate bumps in the road with excitement, not dread.

Electronic Lock Differentials

Why go the four-by-four route if you aren’t going to go 100%? Front and rear electronic-locking differentials come standard on every Ram Heavy Duty Power Wagon to give it true four-wheel drive and maximum traction. You’ll be in control every bit of the way.

Of course, this isn’t all the Power Wagon has to offer. You know it comes with a 6.4-liter HEMI® V-8 with best-in-class 410 horsepower and 429 lb.-ft. of torque … all this featuring an unsurpassed powertrain warranty of five years or 100,000 miles. Equip it with a Ram Box, and you’ll be the envy of every other truck on (or off) the road.

Read more at: http://blog.ramtrucks.com/features/standard-features-2014-ram-heavy-duty-power-wagon/

Outfitting for Off-Roading: A Guide to Trail Etiquette

If you’re new to the world of off-roading in your Jeep brand vehicle, learning the ways of the trail can be a little intimidating. That’s what we’re here for. In the last installment of Outfitting for Off-roading, we filled you in on some common off-roading terms to add into your vocab. Today we’ll highlight several of the unwritten rules of trail etiquette and take you through what to expect when you’re first getting out there.

Just like regular city driving, the world of trail blazing has its own unique set of rules. Below are some common situations you may find yourself in while taking on any trail.

Do: Keep other vehicles in sight. Especially if the trail you’re on is not particularly clear, it’s easy to lose track of other vehicles in your party. Make sure you can always see the vehicle behind you in your rear view mirror to prevent anyone from getting off track.

Don’t: Tailgate. Trust us, tailgating on the trail is even more irritating than on the highway. And it’s dangerous. Allow the vehicle ahead of you to completely pass over the obstacle before you make an attempt.

Do: Allow vehicles going up an incline to have the right of way. If a vehicle going up an incline loses momentum, it can cause a potential loss of traction. If you come across this situation on the trail, the vehicle going down should pull over as safely and quickly as possible.

Don’t: Speed. Trail riding is not a quick activity. Take your time, be aware of all obstacles and enjoy the environment around you.

Do: Be prepared. When it comes to spending time on the trails, we couldn’t agree more that it’s better to be safe than sorry. Make sure you bring the essentials, including tow straps, a first-aid kit, a CB radio and a spare tire among other things.

Keep an eye out for the next article when we go over the basics of tackling sand in your Jeep brand vehicle.

Read more at: http://blog.jeep.com/adventures/outfitting-roading-trail-etiquette/

Six Tips for New Owners of Jeep Brand Vehicles

Welcome to the adventure. Your Jeep® brand vehicle will change the way you travel and, just maybe, the way you live. We’re glad you joined this passionate group of the Jeep brand enthusiasts, and we’re excited to be with you on your next off-roading excursion. To help you get started, here are a few tips for new owners of Jeep vehicles. Enjoy the ride.

1. Get into the culture of Jeep vehicles. People who drive Jeep vehicles are a unique bunch. They crave adventure and the outdoors. They love a good road trip but prefer to go off-roading. They’re equally interested in showing off a shiny new ride or a muddy one. And they drive through life with curiosity and courage.

2. Meet other Jeep brand enthusiasts. Attend events like Jeep Jamboree USA. It’s the quickest way to understand your vehicle and what it’s capable of. Plus, you’re bound to make friends with other likeminded off-roaders.

3. Know your vehicle. To get to know the ins and outs of your new Jeep brand vehicle, read through the owner’s manual and visit Jeep.com for information on everything from taking the top down to maintenance schedules to staying connected with Jeep mobile apps.

4. Know your elements. Off-roading brings you face-to-face with a variety of terrains and challenges. Fortunately, we have a few tips  for tackling the trails, whether you’re rock crawling or driving in sand. And be sure you Get to Know Your Mud — we know you’re anxious to get dirty.

5. Learn your history. Our heritage Jeep blog posts are a great place to start. Discover the Jeep brand’s strong connection to the military, along with the various Jeep vehicles that have ruled the roads and the trails for more than 70 years.

6. Go Anywhere, Do Anything® You’re now ready for the adventure of a lifetime. It’s up to you to carry on the tradition of adventure.

As read on: https://blog.jeep.com/adventures/six-tips-for-new-owners-of-jeep-brand-vehicles/

POLARIS INTRODUCES TWO NEW OFF-ROAD MODELS

Scrambler XP 1000 EPS and RANGER XP 900 Deluxe added to the line-up

Minneapolis, MN (December 3, 2013)- Polaris® Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII), the leading manufacturer of off-road vehicles, today announced the company is adding two more vehicles to its ever-expanding off-road offering. The Scrambler® XP 1000 EPS and the RANGER®  XP 900 Deluxe continue the company’s aggressive approach to reinvent its product lines and provide innovative products to meet the demands off-road enthusiasts.

“In just the past four months, Polaris has introduced nine new vehicles to its off-road line-up,” said David Longren, vice president of Polaris’ Off-Road Division. “The Scrambler XP 1000 EPS and RANGER XP 900 Deluxe Editions provide off-road enthusiasts with more options for high-powered recreational vehicles.”

In 2013, Polaris introduced the Scrambler XP 850 H.O. which offered sport 4×4 performance complemented with a streamlined design and racks to carry necessities making it a great trail companion. The vehicle featured a proven, 77 horsepower, 850 twin, high output EFI engine with Polaris’ exclusive On-Demand, True All-Wheel Drive (AWD) with engine braking and a sport-tuned suspension for trail enthusiasts. The vehicle’s revolutionary rider ergonomics thanks to the narrow seat, Rolled Independent Rear Suspension (IRS) and high ground clearance made for an exhilarating and comfortable 4×4 trail experience. For the trail riding enthusiast who wants all the features found on the Scrambler XP 850 H.O., but desires even more high performance, Polaris is introducing the new Scrambler XP 1000 EPS, the ultimate sport performance machine.

The Scrambler XP 1000 EPS has the highest horsepower, fastest acceleration, highest ground clearance and longest suspension travel of any big bore ATV. The vehicle’s Polaris-built, single overhead cam 1000 twin engine is based upon the proven 850 twin. The fuel-injected big bore features a 270-degree offset crankshaft and dual balance shafts for in-your-face power that remains incredibly smooth and vibration free. From the instant the Scrambler XP 1000 EPS fires to life, the deep growling exhaust speaks extreme performance. An all-new dual exhaust system allows the engine to breath deep and produces maximum power and performance. For ultimate control on the trail, the unit features Electronic Power Steering (EPS) and Fox® Podium X 2.0 compression adjustable shocks, to tackle any trail obstacle in its way. The vehicle also features matte black cast aluminum wheels with 14 in/35.6 cm Carlisle tires, hand guards, a highly-visible digital gauge cluster, custom seat, dual LED headlights and White Lightning paint.

Also launched in 2013, the RANGER XP 900 defined an all-new class of Hardest Working, Smoothest Riding. Innovations such as the ProStar™ 900 engine, all-new chassis, restyled cockpit, more suspension, accessory integration, easier serviceability and a quieter ride catapulted it to one of Polaris’ best-selling RANGER vehicles. For off-road enthusiasts who want to work hard and play hard, Polaris is introducing the RANGER XP 900 Deluxe. The vehicle has many of the same hardest working, smoothest riding features found on the RANGER XP 900 EPS with the addition of some new key features providing the ultimate combination of sport and utility.

The RANGER XP 900 Deluxe in Nuclear Sunset Orange takes the power of the RANGER XP 900 EPS and couples it with a new cockpit to appeal to the recreational rider. The more-utilitarian bench seat was replaced with bolstered cut-and-sew bucket seats featuring an adjustable driver’s seat and center console with integrated storage for improved comfort and ergonomics. Color-matched half doors provide trail riders with more protection from branches and mud, while the factory-installed audio system in the dash provides endless tunes on the trail. When the operator is done having fun, the RANGER XP 900 Deluxe is still a formidable work partner due to RANGER’s hardest working features such as On-Demand True All-Wheel Drive, one-ton/907.2 kg towing, 1000 lb/453.6 kg box capacity and 1500 lb/680.4 kg total payload. For added convenience, the RANGER XP 900 Deluxe’s cab frame also readily accepts Polaris’ Pro-Fit™ Cab systems and the vehicle’s bed is Lock & Ride® capable making it quick and easy to turn the unit into a recreational vehicle or work partner.

The RANGER XP 900 Deluxe and Scrambler XP 1000 EPS will be available in dealerships in January.

As read on: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/company/news-item.aspx?articleID=181

Behind the Wrangler Willys Wheeler

When Jeep launched the Wrangler Willys Wheeler, an Allpar reader suggested that they should have made it based on the Rubicon instead of the entry-level Sport; while there was some suggestion that the new special edition was another “decal package.”

A couple of readers suggested it would have been more helpful to swap the fenders and fender flares with narrower ones, to help the vehicle reduce its width and fit on more trails and between more obstacles. Tannon Weber wrote, “The WWII military model, Willys CJ-2a and other early Jeeps didn’t have the plastic flares at all, just the flat fenders the same width as the body behind.  A model ostensibly paying specific homage to these early models needs to reflect some of the characteristics of those models, and replacing bolt-on parts should be a fairly cost-effective way to do so.”

Former Jeep engineer Bob Sheaves, however, pointed out that the Willys may have been more carefully thought out than it seems:

The Willys was a bare bones machine that could do its job with the hard parts and wasn’t a fancy SUV. That is what is being done here….it isn’t a Rubicon, with all the fancy doodads like sway-bar disconnects. This is an honest attempt to build a more off-road ready Jeep without the cost of a Rubicon.

The Rubicon is a better off-road vehicle, but the Willys is better off-road than a basic Sport.

The original “Willys” name was stamped into the hood, and the special edition has a plain black decal to keep common hoods across the models. The 4WD decal was originally done with a stencil to save money. The new decals match the original intent exactly. [Using stencils or stamping the name into the hood would be far more expensive.]

Give credit where credit is due….they done good on this one.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2013/11/behind-the-wrangler-willys-wheeler