Archive for the ‘off-road trail’ Tag

Pics Or It Didn’t Happen – Trails End

You’ve just finished telling your friends about your latest wheeling adventure, complete with prolific arm gestures, impressive body language, graphic details, and your overall thoughts about the entire exploit. Dead silence. Then someone says, “pics or it didn’t happen.” Pics, you ask? That’s so three years ago. You got video. High-definition, kick-butt, can-almost-taste-the-dust video.

It wasn’t always this way. It used to be unusual to see video being recorded on the trail. Back in the day, we were the oddity (more than usual) when we showed up at the Telluride Rotary 4×4 Tour in Colorado with a rented VHS camcorder (it was one of the giant ones that rested on your shoulder and made you look like you worked for a television network). We were the only ones videotaping at obstacles, and even still, cameras were a rarity because this was prior to the widespread availability of cell phone cameras. We had several requests for copies of the tape, which we gladly provided after we figured out how to wire two VCRs together and waited for hours while the copying took place.

Nowadays, it’s common to see 4x4s outfitted with forward- and rear-facing waterproof high-definition cameras suction-cupped to the body or glass of the rigs.

A few years and a huge technology jump later, we returned to the Telluride Rotary 4×4 Tour with a Kodak DC50 digital camera at a time when digital cameras were a brand-new thing. The DC50 didn’t take video, required a cable to download, was held like a pair of binoculars, and was relatively large. But at least it was expensive. At the time, it was a cutting-edge piece of hardware that left people (and us) in awe. The filmless camera was quite the conversation piece as we used it on the trails to gather photos.

Technology waits for no one, and nowadays it seems everyone is packing a cell phone that can take a mega-megapixel photo or razor-sharp high-definition video. Often, we’re on the trail, standing between the crowd and an obstacle “working” and we’ll look one way and see a 4×4 doing its thing. We’ll turn the other way and scores of cellphones are pointed at the action. It’s an exciting time. It’s also an embarrassing time when we fall on the rocks and 75 people get it on video.

But now, the wheeling world has entered a new age where technology unrelated to vehicle performance has infused itself into off-roading. It’s probably the most exciting time yet for reliving our off-road adventures, and it’s the incredible growth of vehicle-mounted cameras. We see ’em at trailrides and events all the time. Nowadays, it’s common to see 4x4s outfitted with forward- and rear-facing waterproof high-definition cameras suction-cupped to the body or glass of the rigs. We’ve succumbed to the tech and run a small forward-facing dashcam in our Power Wagon all the time. It powers up when the truck starts and shuts off when the ignition is turned off. It has recorded our most heroic off-road moments—and our most stupid mistakes. And we just returned from driving a ’15 Ford F-150 that was equipped with cameras that allow a 360-degree view of the truck. Recording capability isn’t available on the system yet, but we see it coming. Soon, we may be able to check an option box that will outfit a 4×4 with the technology that will allow us to record everything that goes on in each direction as we wheel using factory-installed cameras.

Nowadays, video is on a tear, and the phrase should be “video or it didn’t happen.” Which leads us to this question: If you use a dedicated video recorder when you go wheeling, what kind do you use? Is it mounted inside or outside of your rig? Do you run more than one video camera? Where are you most likely to use the footage: social media, your club’s website, or just for personal use? What is the most amazing footage you’ve captured? Or, do you think recording video of off-roading is stupid?

From: http://www.fourwheeler.com/features/1503-pics-or-it-didnt-happen-trails-end/#ixzz3RRzQkAvD

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Outfitting for Off-Roading: A Guide to Trail Etiquette

If you’re new to the world of off-roading in your Jeep brand vehicle, learning the ways of the trail can be a little intimidating. That’s what we’re here for. In the last installment of Outfitting for Off-roading, we filled you in on some common off-roading terms to add into your vocab. Today we’ll highlight several of the unwritten rules of trail etiquette and take you through what to expect when you’re first getting out there.

Just like regular city driving, the world of trail blazing has its own unique set of rules. Below are some common situations you may find yourself in while taking on any trail.

Do: Keep other vehicles in sight. Especially if the trail you’re on is not particularly clear, it’s easy to lose track of other vehicles in your party. Make sure you can always see the vehicle behind you in your rear view mirror to prevent anyone from getting off track.

Don’t: Tailgate. Trust us, tailgating on the trail is even more irritating than on the highway. And it’s dangerous. Allow the vehicle ahead of you to completely pass over the obstacle before you make an attempt.

Do: Allow vehicles going up an incline to have the right of way. If a vehicle going up an incline loses momentum, it can cause a potential loss of traction. If you come across this situation on the trail, the vehicle going down should pull over as safely and quickly as possible.

Don’t: Speed. Trail riding is not a quick activity. Take your time, be aware of all obstacles and enjoy the environment around you.

Do: Be prepared. When it comes to spending time on the trails, we couldn’t agree more that it’s better to be safe than sorry. Make sure you bring the essentials, including tow straps, a first-aid kit, a CB radio and a spare tire among other things.

Keep an eye out for the next article when we go over the basics of tackling sand in your Jeep brand vehicle.

Read more at: http://blog.jeep.com/adventures/outfitting-roading-trail-etiquette/