Archive for the ‘motorcycle safety’ Tag

May is Motorcycle Awareness Month

Help reduce the number of motorcycle and scooter accidents by raising awareness this month.

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This is the perfect opportunity to brush up on your road safety knowledge, and discover some of the things that you can do to reduce the number of car-vs-motorcycle accidents. In 2012, more than 4500 motorcyclists lost their lives on American roads. This number represented 15 percent of all people killed as a result of auto accidents that year.

Motorcycle accidents often happen because drivers simply aren’t paying attention. Many car-vs-motorcycle collisions occur because motorcycles are small, and can easily disappear in a car or truck’s blind spot.

Motorcyclists can also play an important role in ensuring their safety by ensuring that they’re highly visible at all times. Wearing reflecting clothing, signaling when overtaking or making a turn, as well as wearing a helmet can reduce the chances of an accident/ serious injury.

That being said, motorists can also play their part when it comes to protecting motorcyclists on the road.

Tips for car drivers:

– Always be aware of your surroundings. Keep your attention on the road and don’t use your mobile phone while driving. Refrain from applying makeup, reading, drinking, eating, or engaging in any activity that takes your attention off of the road. Engaging in these activities will limit your concentration leading to distracted driving and a possible car accident.

– Always signal when you’re changing lanes or merging with traffic.

– Even more importantly, always check your blind spots and mirrors extensively before merging or changing lanes. This is something that not enough drivers do, and can easily lead to a tragic accident.

– Give motorcyclists a full lane while driving, regardless of the size of their vehicle.

– Don’t follow too closely to a motorcycle. Ideally, you should give motorcyclists a following distance of more than 4 seconds. This will give the both of you enough time to react in case of anything unexpected. It’s important to realize that a 2-3 ton car will take much longer to stop than a 400 lb motorcycle.

As read on: http://www.prweb.com/releases/motorcycle/safety/prweb11820691.htm3

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10 motorcycle safety tips for new riders – Expert advice for first-time and returning riders

Motorcycles are fun and fuel efficient. That’s not news to anyone who’s ridden one. But neither is the fact that they’re also way more dangerous than a car. The cold reality is that motorcyclists are 30 times more likely to die in a crash than people in a car, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). And nearly half of all motorcycle deaths are the result of single-vehicle crashes.

The numbers are even scarier for older riders, who are increasingly taking up or returning to motorcycling after many years. Because of slower reflexes, weaker eyesight, more brittle bones, and other disadvantages, riders over 60 years old are three times more likely to be hospitalized after a crash than younger ones.

Still, many enthusiasts enjoy a lifetime of riding without injury. The key to optimizing your odds is to be prepared and avoid risks. Keep in mind that 48 percent of fatalities in 2010 involved speeding, according to the IIHS, and alcohol was a factor in 42 percent. Eliminate those factors and you’ve dramatically reduced your risk.

Below are some more tips to help you stay safe on two wheels. Learn more in our motorcycle hub, buying guide, and in our reliability and owner satisfaction report.

Don’t buy more bike than you can handle. If you’ve been off of motorcycles for awhile, you may be surprised by the performance of today’s bikes. Even models with small-displacement engines are notably faster and more powerful than they were 10 or 20 years ago.

When shopping for a bike, start with one that fits you. When seated, you should easily be able to rest both feet flat on the ground without having to be on tiptoes. Handlebars and controls should be within easy reach. Choose a model that’s easy for you to get on and off the center stand; if it feels too heavy, it probably is. A smaller model with a 250- to 300-cc engine can make a great starter or commuter bike. If you plan on doing a lot of highway riding, you might want one with an engine in the 500- to 750-cc range so you can easily keep up with traffic. (Before buying, see our report on motorcycle reliability and owner satisfaction.)

Invest in antilock brakes. Now available on a wide array of models, antilock brakes are a proven lifesaver. IIHS data shows that motorcycles equipped with ABS brakes were 37 percent less likely to be involved in a fatal crash than bikes without it. “No matter what kind of rider you are, ABS can brake better than you,” says Bruce Biondo of the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles Motorcycle Safety Program.

The reason is simple: Locking up the brakes in a panic stop robs the rider of any steering control. That can easily lead to a skid and crash, which can result in serious injury. ABS helps you retain steering control during an emergency stop, and it can be especially valuable in slippery conditions.

This critical feature is now standard on many high-end models and adds only a few hundred dollars to the price of more basic bikes. You may be able to offset some of the cost with an insurance discount. Either way, we think it’s a worthwhile investment in your safety.

Hone your skills. As Honda’s Jon Seidel puts it, “There is nothing we could say or advise more than to go find a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) riding course in your area. That’s critical, absolutely critical.” An MSF course or similar class can teach you the basics, as well as advanced techniques, such as how to perform evasive emergency maneuvers. The cost ranges from free to about $350. An approved safety course may make you eligible for an insurance discount and, in some states, to skip the road-test and/or the written test part of the licensing process. Some motorcycle manufacturers offer a credit toward the cost of a new motorcycle or training if a rider signs up for an MSF course. The MSF website lists about 2,700 locations for such courses around the United States.

Use your head. Yes, helmets are an emotional topic for some riders. But the facts show the risk. Riders without a helmet are 40 percent more likely to suffer a fatal head injury in a crash and are three times more likely to suffer brain injuries, than those with helmets, according to government studies.

When Texas and Arkansas repealed their helmet laws, they saw a 31- and 21-percent increase in motorcycle fatalities, respectively. “It is absolute insanity to repeal helmet laws,” says Orly Avitzur, M.D., a neurologist and a Consumer Reports medical adviser. “Because helmets do save lives, it is insanity to expose the skull and the brain to potential trauma that could be prevented or at least mitigated.”

A full-face helmet that’s approved by the Department of Transportation is the best choice. (Look for a DOT certification sticker on the helmet.) Modern helmets are strong, light weight, and comfortable, and they cut down on wind noise and fatigue. Keep in mind that helmets deteriorate over time, and may not be safe even if they look fine. The Snell Memorial Foundation, an independent helmet testing and standards-setting organization, recommends replacing a helmet every five years, or sooner if it’s been damaged or has been in a crash. Beyond potential deterioration due to aging and exposure to hair oils and chemicals, Snell points out that there is often a notable improvement over that time in helmet design and materials.

Wear the right gear. Jeans, a T-shirt, and sandals are recipes for a painful disaster on a bike. Instead, you want gear that will protect you from wind chill, flying bugs and debris, and, yes, lots of road rash if you should slide out. For maximum protection, go for a leather or other reinforced jacket, gloves, full pants, and over-the-ankle footwear, even in summer. Specially designed jackets with rugged padding and breathable mesh material provide protection as well as ventilation for riding in warm weather. You’ll also want effective eye protection; don’t rely on eyeglasses or a bike’s windscreen. Use a helmet visor or goggles. And keep in mind that car drivers who have hit a motorcycle rider often say they just didn’t see them, so choose gear in bright colors.

Be defensive. A recent study by the University of South Florida’s Center for Urban Transportation Research found that in collisions involving a motorcycle and a car, car drivers were at fault 60 percent of the time. So, you need to be extra alert, especially in this age of epidemic phone use and texting behind the wheel. Keep an eye out for cars suddenly changing lanes or pulling out from side streets. And don’t tailgate; keeping a safe following distance is critical, both to ensure you have enough stopping distance and so you have time to react to obstacles in the road. An object that a car might easily straddle could be a serious hazard when on a bike.

Avoid bad weather. Slippery conditions reduce your margin for error. Rain not only cuts your visibility but reduces your tires’ grip on the road, which can make cornering tricky. If you need to ride in the rain, remember that the most dangerous time is right after precipitation begins, as the water can cause oil residue to rise to the top. And avoid making sudden maneuvers. Be especially gentle with the brakes, throttle, and steering to avoid sliding. When riding in strong side winds, be proactive in anticipating the potential push from the side by moving to the side of the lane the wind is coming from. This will give you some leeway in the lane, should a gust nudge you.

Watch for road hazards. A motorcycle has less contact with the pavement than a car. Sand, wet leaves, or pebbles can cause a bike to slide unexpectedly, easily resulting in a spill. Bumps and potholes that you might barely notice in a car can pose serious danger when on a bike. If you can’t avoid them, slow down as much as possible before encountering them, with minimal steering input. Railroad tracks and other hazards should be approached as close to a right angle as possible, to reduce the chances of a skid.

Be ready to roll. Before each ride, do a quick walk-around to make sure your lights, horn, and directional signals are working properly. Check the chain, belt, or shaft and the brakes. And inspect the tires for wear and make sure they’re set at the proper pressure. Motorcycle mechanics we’ve spoken with say they routinely see worn-out brakes and improperly inflated tires that greatly increase safety risks. When tires are under-inflated, “handling gets really hard, steering gets hard, and the bike doesn’t want to lean,” says Mike Franklin, owner of Mike’s Garage in Los Angles.

As read on: http://consumerreports.org/cro/2013/04/10-motorcycle-safety-tips-for-new-riders/index.htm

Motorcycle Safety: Spring Brings New Hazards

As the snow melts away, the desire to experience the wind in your face gets stronger. Motorcyclists across the country are charging battery’s, checking tire pressure, and putting a good coat of wax on their trusty steed. Making ready for that first warm afternoon, when they can get out on the highway. Harley’s or Honda’s, all motorcycle riders look forward to the first spring ride in the country.

Before you blast out of your driveway, a few safety reminders are worth going over. In your hurry to be the first on the road, you don’t want to be the first to the hospital because you got in too much of a hurry.

We’ll assume you prepared your motorcycle properly when you put it in storage for the winter. To make sure your cycle is ready to go, check all fluid levels, check tire pressures, and add some fresh gas. Charge up the battery, and hit the start button. With a well maintained motorcycle, this is about all that’s necessary if you did your proper maintenance before winter storage.

The rest of your preparation has a lot to do with attitude. Being safe on the road depends primarily on how alert you are while riding, and how well you are paying attention to what’s going on around you.

After a long winter, with road crews working long hours to keep the roads clear of ice and snow, there is a very dangerous residual leftover from the plowing process. That is the SAND the highway department used on roads. Loose sand is everywhere in the early Spring. Corners, intersections, main roads and side streets alike. This accumulation of sand presents a severe danger to all two wheeled vehicles.

Remember when you went into that long curve last Fall. The one where you leaned way over as you went through it. Leaning allowed you to navigate that long corner at a faster speed, plus it felt cool. If you make the mistake of leaning over and powering through that corner in the Spring, when some left over sand is still on the road, your wheels will slide out from under you. Road rash is very painful, sliding on asphalt will rapidly grind skin and meat off your body. Not a good experience.

Watch out for loose sand at intersections as well. Stopping too fast on a thin layer of sand will send you sliding into the intersection. Possibly into the path of cross traffic. If your tailgating a city bus, you may find yourself doing a face plant right into the back end of that bus.

The dreaded four wheeler, people driving cars have forgotten all about motorcycles over the past few months. Even in good weather in the middle of summer a motorcycle is almost invisible to cars. Headlights on can help, but it’s vital that you ride with the attitude that everyone out there is trying to kill you. For all practical purposes they are, be it unintentional, but none the less tangling with a car is the last thing a motorcycle rider wants to do.

The inexperienced rider, new motorcycle owners will be out there in large quantities. With the price of gas reaching the stars, more and more people will be opting for the much cheaper to operate motorcycle for daily transportation. Not only should these new riders be extremely cautious as they have a lot to learn about safety, but the experienced rider can find themselves in trouble because of mistakes made by someone with little or no experience, that happens to be in their riding space.

When you head out on the road this spring, be aware. Know what’s going on around you and give yourself enough space to safely navigate around dangers. Motorcycle riding is one of the best ways to experience what our country has to offer. Be sure you enjoy it safely.

As read on: http://voices.yahoo.com/motorcycle-safety-spring-brings-hazards-1321887.html