Archive for the ‘led headlamps’ Tag

THE NEW 2017 JEEP® WRANGLER WINTER EDITION LIGHTS THE NEW YEAR

The new 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Winter Edition has arrived at the perfect time. With snow covering the trails and the city streets, and cold-weather adventure waiting, the Winter Edition of the award-winning Jeep Wrangler is ready to off-road into the holidays and beyond. And the 2017 Jeep Wrangler Winter Edition is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to what the Jeep Wrangler has in store for the New Year.

In addition to the special-edition Willys Wheeler, 75th Anniversary, Rubicon Hard Rock and new Winter Edition models, the Jeep Wrangler and Jeep Wrangler Unlimited roll out features and updates for the 2017 model year like new exterior colors and new available LED headlamps and fog lamps. If you love open-air freedom — even in the frigid air — here’s a bit of what you can expect from the Trail Rated® icon.

New Exterior Colors for 2017

The 2017 Jeep Wrangler two-door and Jeep Wrangler Unlimited four-door will be available in a variety of new paint colors. New color options for 2017 will include Chief (shown above), Gobi, Xtreme Purple and Acid Yellow. Now you’ll have four more paint colors to completely cover in slush and mud in the coming year.

New Available LED Headlamps and Fog Lamps for 2017

New available LED headlamps and fog lamps on the 2017 Jeep Wrangler are designed to help enhance nighttime visibility and light the way on the trail for your next excursion. When it comes to performance, the new LED lights provide greater high-beam output and low-beam output. The LED headlamps and fog lamps come standard on the Sahara and Rubicon, and are optional on the Sport and Sport S.

New 2017 Jeep Wrangler Winter Edition

The New 2017 Jeep Wrangler Winter Edition is engineered to conquer the snow and designed to look good doing it. Performance features on this special-edition Wrangler include 17-inch Mid-Gloss Black slotted aluminum wheels; BF Goodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires; Dana 30 front axle and heavy-duty Dana 44 rear axle; Trac-Lok® limited-slip rear differential standard, Tru-Lok® mechanical rear locker optional; 3.21 axle ratio standard, 3.73 axle ratio optional; Command-Trac® 4×4 transfer case with 2.72:1 ratio; front and rear steel off-road bumpers and premium off-road rock rails.

Exterior Winter Edition features include the new LED headlamps and fog lamps; hood, driver side fender, and rear fender decals; body-color grille with Mid-Gloss Black accents; Mid-Gloss Black Jeep badge; black Freedom Top® hardtop standard, body-color optional; and black fuel filler door, taillamp guards, and deep tint windows. In addition, the 2017 Jeep Wrangler Winter Edition is available in a variety of exterior colors, including Firecracker Red, Chief, Rhino, Granite Crystal, Billet Silver, Black, Bright White and Xtreme Purple.

The 2017 Jeep Wrangler Winter Edition takes no shortcuts on performance and exterior features, and the same can be said for the interior — this Jeep vehicle is built with winter driving in mind. Interior features include heated, leather-trimmed front seats with Sport Mesh inserts and Diesel Gray accent stitching; leather-wrapped steering wheel with Piano Black accents and Diesel Gray accent stitching; Piano Black interior accents; exclusive instrument cluster graphics; remote start* standard (with automatic transmission); the Power Convenience and Connectivity Groups; and all-weather floor mats.

Stay tuned for coming announcements, and learn more about the 2017 Jeep Wrangler at jeep.com.

Read more at: https://blog.jeep.com/news/new-2017-jeep-wrangler-winter-edition-lights-new-year/

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2015 Challenger rundown

As we get closer to the 2015 Dodge Challenger’s midyear launch, it’s worth looking at what’s coming down the pike.

The Challenger is moving from its current “LC” body to the “LA” body, as noted years ago by Allpar when plans first started. Most observers expect relatively few exterior changes to the car, though the dimensions will change along with key parts (including the floorpan); the classic Challenger lines will remain, but the front fascia will change, still maintaining links to the classic 1970s Dodge Challengers. The tail is likely to be modernized with smooth “light pipe” LEDs, and BMW-style “halo headlamps” seem to be in the works (at least for some models, possibly not for the base cars).

The eight speed automatic is likely to become standard across the board, but enthusiasts can still get the manual six-speed — if they opt for a V8. So far numbers appear to be too low to justify a six-speed V6 combination. With the eight speed, it seems likely that the standard Hemi and 392 SRT engines will both post faster acceleration numbers with the automatic. That leaves the HellCat V8, rumored to generate a stunning 665 or more horsepower — which would make it the most powerful production V8 in the world.

There has been talk of using aluminum to lighten the body, and while this might be done with some panels, it seems unlikely that the car will be much, if at all, lighter than the current Challenger. Some critics have complained about Challenger’s weight disadvantage versus some Camaros and Mustangs, without mentioning that Challenger is also a considerably larger car inside; most critics have mentioned that Challenger is also more comfortable. Given the need to handle an extra 200 or so horsepower, it seems unlikely there will be any weight loss at all, but engineers are probably working hard to minimize the weight gain by using more high-strength steel and, yes, aluminum. But it seems unlikely, given costs, technology, the length of time this Challenger will be in the field, and the need to use the existing plant without completely changing the body shop, that the car will use aluminum as part of its key structure. Perhaps in 2018-2020, or whenever the next large cars are developed, but not now.

Update: It seems likely that rumors of a lighter-weight Challenger date back to plans to replace or augment Challenger with a “Barracuda,” a shorter-wheelbase car that would compete more directly with best-seller Camaro. However, these plans were publicly acknowledged by Chrysler executives, who said that they did not work — the Barracuda name was rejected by enthusiasts (since there were no Plymouth or Barracuda cues on the proposed car) and the vehicle just did not work. Instead, a new car will be added — a midsized, rear wheel drive car whose development and engineering is being shared by Dodge and Alfa Romeo. We believe engineering is led by Dodge, with Alfa Romeo having a small team that is participating in the “base car” and having total control of their own version. There are many open questions about this new car, including whether the Dodge will have room for V8s (including 392), since the Alfa is unlikely to go beyond its Maserati-Ferrari twin-turbo V6; but these are all separate issues.

The new Challenger will have the most extensive choice of engines of any Chrysler or Dodge car, with a V6 and three V8s. The current 392 Hemi will remain, supplemented by the supercharged 6.2 motor — now believed to retain the HellCat name when it appears before the public.

A comprehensive interior upgrade is expected, bringing Charger-like amenities, a configurable cluster, along with an electronics update to UConnect 2 with all the gadgets ’n’ gizmos that brings; the option list should grow to match 300C’s, including forward sensors, rear camera, adaptive cruise, and predictive crash protection.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/02/2015-challenger-rundown