Archive for the ‘jeep wrangler unlimited’ Tag

Wrangler looks to aluminum suspension, not body

The Jeep Grand Cherokee may have shown the future direction of the Jeep Wrangler: using aluminum and other lightweight materials for the suspension and peripherals, but not for the frame or key body parts.

Cheap body repairs are important for Wrangler, because it’s intended to be taken off-road. However, if the company can use relatively light, “high-strength” steel alloy for skid plates and more aluminum in the suspension and other major components, it could still cut weight, or at least maintain weight in the face of higher safety standards (both Federal and insurance-industry).

Key design changes, including using permanent A-pillars and having the windshield itself slide down over the hood rather than folding down both the windshield and pillars at once, could help the Wrangler to have greater “natural” torsional stiffness, so that chassis reinforcement would not be needed, also cutting weight while letting the Wrangler meet normal rollover standards.

The 2018 Jeep Wrangler is also likely to have a hydroformed frame, as Ram trucks do, increasing stiffness without weight gains. Some reports claim the windshield and grille will only be a little more slanted than the current Wrangler.

This gives the company more time to develop aluminum-bodied cars. Scuttlebutt now has the Grand Cherokee as the first to go with the expensive but lightweight metal.

Read more at: http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/09/wrangler-looks-to-aluminum-suspension-not-body-29910

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Announcing the Motor Mall Recreational Jeep Track!

We are excited to announce that we have broken ground on our Recreational Jeep Track at Dick Scott Motor Mall in Fowlerville, Michigan! We will have rocks, logs, obstacles, hills and more!

Visit our blog and our Facebook and Instagram account to watch for updates on our progress and our official Grand Opening Announcement!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marchionne: Next Wrangler won’t be all-aluminum

The next-generation Jeep Wrangler won’t be all aluminum, according to FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne.

Marchionne spoke to reporters at the SAE Foundation’s Annual Celebration last night. He was the guest of honor at the event where he received the group’s 2015 Industry Leadership award.

According to a report in today’s Detroit News, Marchionne said that company tests showed the costs of an all-aluminum body outweighed the weight-saving benefits.

“Because of the difference in cost, not just the new material but the actual assembly process, I think we can do almost as well without doing it all-aluminum,” Marchionne was quoted as saying.

The decision could have been fueled by the difficulties Ford Motor Company faced in producing the latest-generation F-150 pickup. The problems, including the tearing of aluminum body panels in the stamping process, caused delays and constrained early deliveries of Ford’s moneymaker.

The announcement could boost the prospects for Toledo, Ohio, which is spending millions of dollars trying to keep Wrangler production in the city.

Marchionne didn’t give any hints, but said Toledo is one of just two sites being considered for the next-generation of the Wrangler.

During his comments, Marchionne also spoke about the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) latest actions.

“We need to work with the agency in a very cooperative and open way to make sure that we can meet their requirements for their new stance,” Marchionne said. “We have no option but to comply with their requirements and we will. I have nothing to hide in this process. I just want clear rules.”

He said the agency’s increasingly aggressive stance will increase automakers’ costs as they try to meet new demands; and that he will not be testifying at the NHTSA’s public hearings scheduled for July 2.

Speaking about the new Jeep Renegade, Marchionne confirmed that several issues, including some software problems, were limiting availability of the Italian-built small Jeep.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/05/marchionne-next-wrangler-wont-be-all-aluminum-28735

Jeep Performance Parts Introduces Factory-Designed 4-Inch Wrangler Lift Kit

When you buy a new Jeep Wrangler, you’re not really getting a new car—you’re getting a blank canvas to customize, modify, hack apart, and bolt back together in whatever crazy one-off combo you desire. Jeep knows this, as evidenced by the plethora of Mopar and Jeep Performance Parts accessories available for the venerable off-roader. Now, you can roll with the big boys but maintain the reassurance of factory engineering: Next month, Jeep Performance Parts will begin offering a four-inch suspension lift for the Wrangler.

We first saw the new four-inch kit at the unveiling of Jeep’s 2015 Moab Easter Safari concepts, albeit clandestinely: The custom Red Rock Responder concept (shown above) sits on the Jeep Performance Parts lift. Jeep’s in-house accessory line has offered a two-inch lift for some time—as seen on the Wrangler Africa and Jeep Chief concepts also shown at the Easter Safari showcase—but this is the first time Jeep has offered a four-inch kit engineered in-house.

The kit packs new springs, remote-reservoir shocks, new control arms, a new front driveshaft and yoke, lengthened brake lines, a high-steer conversion kit, a steering damper, and all the necessary brackets to complete the installation. The whole outfit costs $2250, though sadly, it’s available only for the four-door Wrangler, 2007 to current.

Of course, if you really want to roll with the biggest boys, you’ll need to throw in another upgrade from the Jeep Performance Parts catalog: bolt-in front and rear Dana 60 axles with either 4.88:1 or 5.38:1 gearing and the brakes from a Ram 3500. Which, if you go that route, will add another $13,000 total to your project budget. But hey, you can never be too prepared.

Read more at: http://blog.caranddriver.com/jeep-performance-parts-introduces-factory-designed-4-inch-wrangler-lift-kit/

How We’d Spec It: Yes, Basic Jeep Wranglers Still Exist in 2015

In light of Jeep’s recent forays into crossover-dom—see the Renegade and Cherokee, please—we’ve been hit hard with nostalgia for the brand’s good ol’ days. You know, the ones filled with solid axles, real four-wheel drive with low-range gearing, and manly stick-shift transmissions. So we moseyed over to Jeep’s online configurator to start building out a Wrangler, only to remember that, holy crap, the things are expensive. (Oh, and they’re huge.) That’s okay, our ideal Wrangler isn’t some gussied-up, $40,000 toy—it’s a beastly, featureless stripper model, and thanks to Jeep’s addition of a sweet new off-road tire option to the base Sport for 2015, that fantasy can once again be had for relatively little money. This is how we’d spec a Wrangler:

MODEL:

Jeep Sport Two-Door Manual 4×4 (base price: $23,790)

There are no fewer than 9 different Wrangler trim levels, two body styles, and—on most models—the choice of a manual or an automatic transmission. With the top-level, four-door Unlimited Rubicon Hard Rock pushing $40,990, and even milder versions like the sweet-looking Willys Wheeler running between $27,790 and $31,590, we needed to stay toward the bottom of the pile to satiate our base-model fetish. It doesn’t get more basic than the Sport, which starts at $23,790 and comes with steel wheels, crank windows, manual door locks, manual door mirrors, manual seats, a heater, Dana axles, four-wheel drive, four-wheel disc brakes, a six-speed manual transmission, fog lights, and a folding soft top.

Air conditioning is optional, as is Bluetooth, a hardtop, and satellite radio. The interior is washable—there are drain plugs in the floor for evacuating water—and although there are wisps of decadence in the standard cruise control, steering-wheel audio controls, eight-speaker audio system, and the 284-hp Pentastar V-6, this is as stripped as Jeeps come.

OPTIONS:

Sunset Orange Pearl paint ($0)

Air conditioning bypass ($0)

Half metal doors with manual locks ($0)

Black Steel and 31-inch Dueler Tire Package ($995) (regular rims get 225/75R16 on/off road; black package brings 245/75R16)

Connectivity Group ($570)

As you might have noticed, our first three selected options are all no-cost. Free stuff is always good, but in the case of our dream Wrangler, it’s less a case of free stuff and more of a case of not paying money for things. For example, the paint is free, so we picked the brightest color we could find: Sunset Orange Pearl. Next, we chose not to add air conditioning for $1295; gotta love Jeep, the company actually has an option box for “air conditioning bypass,” which is really just a fancy way of saying “summer’s gonna be hot.” (Take off the roof and cruise, we say!) Finally, we shelled out zero smackers for half-metal doors with removable plastic side windows (not pictured above), which replace the standard full-metal doors and make top-down excursions feel even more open and more fun.

Now for the stuff we actually had to pay for. We’re fans of steel wheels, but the Wrangler’s standard steel-wheel/tire combo is a bit weak-looking. The tires are street-oriented and skinny, while the steelies are a boring shade of silver. Thankfully, Jeep introduced the $995 Black Steel and 31-inch Dueler Tire Package for 2015, which includes meatier, 31-inch Bridgestone Dueler white-letter tires and the base Wrangler’s same steel wheels—only they’re painted black. Sweet. Vanity and enhanced off-road capability taken care of, the only option left (to us—Jeep offers many more, including different axle ratios, hardtops, a towing package, and even an automatic transmission) was the $570 Connectivity Group that brings functional upgrades such as a tire-pressure-monitor display, Uconnect voice recognition, Bluetooth, and what Jeep calls an “electronic vehicle information center.”

Would we consider $25,550 “cheap?” Not exactly, but in today’s Jeep Wrangler landscape, it’s a steal. And besides, to most folks, a Jeep looks like, well, a Jeep—no matter if it is a back-to-basics Luddite like our Wrangler Sport or a fully loaded Rubicon. We almost don’t want a nice Wrangler, because then we’d have reservations about scratching its body-color fender flares on brush or soiling its leather interior with mud or snow. A Sport, on the other hand, is ready to be grabbed by the scruff of its neck—or its padded roll bar—and tossed down the nearest off-road trail without stress. Yep, basic Jeeps still exist, but they’re getting harder to find; we hope Jeep can keep some of that stripper spirit alive in the next Wrangler coming out in 2017.

As read on: http://blog.caranddriver.com/how-wed-spec-it-yes-basic-jeep-wranglers-still-exist-in-2015/

Jeep hauls in more awards

The Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel was named 2015 Green SUV of the Year by Green Car Journal. The announcement was made yesterday at the Washington Auto Show in the nation’s capital.

In making the presentation, Ron Cogan, editor and publisher of Green Car Journal and CarsOfChange.com said, “The Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel delivers what today’s drivers really want in an efficient SUV. It offers a do-everything nature with exceptional comfort, power, functionality and driving range, plus surprising efficiency that delivers lower environmental impact.”

On Wednesday, January 21, the Grand Cherokee collected its “SUV of Texas” trophy at the Houston Auto Show.

The Jeep Wrangler received one of Kelley Blue Book’s 2015 Best Resale Value Awards. The Wrangler was No. 2 among the top ten honorees. This is the fifth consecutive year the Wrangler has made the top ten.

In their comments about the Wrangler, KBB.com’s editors said, “There are few vehicles that have remained as faithful to their origins like the 2015 Jeep Wrangler SUV. Despite decades of development, multiple iterations and even necessary nods to modern technology, the Wrangler remains true to its hard-earned and thoroughly deserved reputation as the universal standard for off-road vehicles.”

The Wrangler picked up a total of three Best Resale Value awards. In addition to the Top Ten award, the standard Wrangler also took top honors in the Compact SUV category, beating the new Honda CR-V and the Subaru Forester, while the Wrangler Unlimited took the prize in the Mid-Size SUV category, beating the Toyota 4Runner and Toyota Highlander.

Dodge also picked up a Best Resale Value award: the 2015 Charger won its class, earning Kelley Blue Book’s Best Resale Value Award for full-size cars. The Charger beat the 2015 Toyota Avalon and 2015 Chevrolet Caprice.

“Dodge’s full-size sedan offering is more versatile than ever after being redesigned for the 2015 model year,” said the editors. “With a new look that includes a redesigned hood, front doors, spoiler, taillights and front fascia, the Dodge Charger still offers space for both people and cargo. That combination helps the Charger earn the top resale value in its category.”

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/01/jeep-hauls-in-more-awards

Fitting 8 speeds into Wrangler

The Jeep Wrangler is one of two vehicles still being built with Mercedes’ five-speed automatic (made by Chrysler in Indiana). The reason for that, according to Allpar sources, is the length of the ZF eight-speed which would be much better for Wrangler: it may fit into the Unlimited, but it won’t fit into the standard Wrangler.

Even when the next-generation “JL” Wrangler arrives, that transmission will be too long, as it’s made now. Yet, Automotive News and Allpar have both heard that the iconic Jeep will indeed have the eight-speed, which is practically mandatory if one wants to get the most out of the Pentastar V6 engine – especially if the Wrangler drops down to the 3.2 liter version, as we expect.

The solution may be to carefully alter the transmission and transfer case, according to former Jeep engineer, and current engineer-at-large, Robert Sheaves. See his illustrated article to learn more about how the eight-speed can be shoe-horned into even short-wheelbase Wranglers.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/12/fitting-8-speeds-into-wrangler

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT

Let’s talk asses for a moment. What do they have to do with the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, you ask?

Well, we’re here to tell you that this SRT can haul some. Lots of them, as a matter of fact: Jeep has increased the towing capacity of its most powerful SUV to 7,200 pounds. Assuming the average donkey weighs about 400 pounds, the Grand Cherokee SRT can haul ass to the tune of 18 burros, give or take a covered trailer or so, which is significantly more than it could in previous years. In 2013, the machine could manage 5,000 pounds, while the first generation was rated at just 3,500. The increase is mostly attributable to a new eight-speed automatic transmission and beefier rear axle, and it’s a welcome update for those who’d like to use their SUV as, well, an SUV with an emphasis on utility.

You’ll be pleased to know that this isn’t the only kind of ass hauling the 2014 Grand Cherokee SRT is capable ? it can also accelerate really, really quickly ? 0-60 in 4.8 seconds to go along with quarter mile times in the low 13-second range and a top speed of 160 miles per hour. That’s extraordinary for a vehicle of this ilk ? and the run to 60 matches that of the last-gen model despite an extra shift taking place due to the new gearbox. Passing performance is even more impressive, as evidenced by a 35-75 mph sprint that’s almost four seconds quicker than it was last year, again, thanks to the extra three gears in the transmission. It goes without saying that the 470 horses grazing on premium unleaded and spitting out 465 pound-feet of torque are also responsible for these accelerative antics, along with the full-time four-wheel-drive system called Selec-Track, which provides more traction than the most stubborn mule in the animal kingdom.

We’ve been rather fond of previous versions of this menacing machine, and with a slew of meaningful enhancements on the menu for the 2014 model year, we took to the track at the brand-new and most excellent Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas at the invitation of Jeep to find out just how Grand the iconic Cherokee nameplate has become.

We’ll start with the styling. “Aggressive” is the word that best describes the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, from its massive 20-inch wheels ? a different pattern than last year’s controversial “Spider Monkey” alloys is now available ? wrapped in Pirelli P-Zero P295/45/ZR20 tires (Pirelli Scorpion Verde all-seasons are also available) to the unique blacked-out front fascia dominated by Jeep’s traditional seven-slat grille. Viewed in profile, there aren’t too many clues to the casual onlooker, besides the massive wheels, of course, that this isn’t your average SUV. But look a little closer and you’ll see details like blacked-out headlight clusters with LED surrounds and a deeply scooped hood with functional heat extractors ? telltale signs that this mule is built to haul.

Even if you happen to be behind this brutish ‘ute, it will be impossible to miss Jeep’s SRT ? if the unique rear fascia doesn’t tip you off, the rumble emanating from the dual exhaust tips is sure to seal the deal. The soundtrack belted out by the massive 6.4-liter Hemi V8 will stir the souls of all those enamored with big displacement and natural aspiration ? you can count us among that group ? just as surely as it will irritate your grandparents on long highway slogs.

If nothing else, looking at and listening to the Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT proves that SRT CEO Ralph Gilles isn’t just blowing smoke when he says that the brand is “Unapologetically selling high performance.”

It’s also worth noting that the rear glass is no longer separate from the rest of the tailgate. Jeep says the change makes the piece lighter while improving rear visibility. That’s all true, but the ability to stick long objects out the back without a fully erect lid is now lost, though that may at least partially be forgiven since the tailgate is now power operated.

The look inside the cabin has also been fine-tuned for performance drivers. Carbon fiber trim replaces the wood accents found in less powerful Grand Cherokee models, and the so-called Laguna leather and suede seating surfaces are nice and grippy. New for the model year is a dual-pane panoramic sunroof option. Oh, don’t forget the bright red engine start/stop button. Racy!

SRT’s new-for-2014 steering wheel deserves mention. According to Gilles, the automaker purchased wheels of high-performance models hailing from the likes of Audi, BMW and Porsche to make sure its wheel, one of the most tactile parts of the driving experience, is truly world class. As far as we’re concerned, SRT has nailed it ? the wheel is nice and meaty where your hands want to rest, and the buttons and controls don’t get in the way while driving. Similarly, the big metal paddle shifters on either side of the wheel are easy to locate and feel good to the touch.

Along with the new transmission comes a new shifter. Shaped like a traditional T, the lever is now fully electronic, with separate detents when moving from Park to Reverse, Neutral or Drive. As with all such doohickeys, this one takes some time getting comfortable with, but it eventually becomes a non-issue. Directly behind the shifter is a rotating knob with settings labeled Track, Sport, Auto, Snow and Tow, and just to the right of that is a button labeled Launch. We’ll talk more about these bits and pieces later.

The biggest changes to the interior are the new 8.4-inch Uconnect central infotainment system, of which many Autoblog staffers voted tops in its category when it won the AOL Technology of the Year Award for 2012, and the seven-inch customizable display in the gauge cluster.

For the 2014 model year, Chrysler is introducing Uconnect Access Via Mobile, which includes navigation and apps like Aha Radio, Pandora, iHeart Radio and Slacker, plus safety features that include an embedded cellular chip that can contact emergency services; remotely lock, unlock or start the car; and alert the owner of a possible theft.

The entire Uconnect system can now be activated using voice commands, from switching radio stations, changing climate settings, answering or making phone calls or calling upon the cloud using Bing search for directions, places of interest or phone numbers. Drivers can also send and receive text messages if they have connected their phone via Bluetooth.

Since this is an SRT model, the center screen also displays performance data. For instance, the driver can call upon a series of gauges to monitor the vehicle’s vital signs, a graphic display of the car showing the g-forces from every direction, lap times or current and best acceleration and braking figures.

Directly in front of the driver is a new seven-inch instrument cluster screen that can electronically display things like the car’s speed, current powertrain and suspension settings, trip information, fuel economy, radio settings and plenty more.

Now that we’re familiar with our surroundings, it’s finally time to hit that big red button to start the engine.

You might think that driving the 2014 Grand Cherokee SRT is all about the engine… and you wouldn’t necessarily be wrong.

The grunt underhood does indeed dominate the driving experience, and we mean that in the best way possible. Acceleration from a dead stop is effortless up to freeway speeds and beyond, though you won’t be lighting up the rear tires as with other products from SRT. Instead, instant all-wheel-drive traction is the name of the game, and holeshot starts are as easy as touching the Launch button we mentioned earlier.

One press puts the car into a predetermined mode that optimizes everything for straight-line acceleration. The suspension hunkers down, the transmission goes into its sportiest programming mode and the engine settles into a 2,000-rpm hum. Let your foot off the brake while mashing the throttle, and you’ll be to 60 mph in well under five seconds, each and every time, so long as you’re not driving on something as slick as snow, mud, snot or marbles.

Assuming you’re interested in more than just pin-your-passengers-back antics, we suggest you investigate the dial to the right of the Launch button. If you’re driving at a track, there’s a dedicated mode that takes as many of the electronic nannies away as Jeep’s engineers felt was safe, including the removal of anything that would take full power away from the engine, along with a torque split that sends 70 percent to the rear tires. There’s still roll mitigation and some small level of traction control, however, and that’s likely a good thing for everyone but professional race car drivers.

Sport mode adds some of those failsafe features back into the mix, but still allows enough wheelspin to make an aggressive driver feel fast while still being under control with a 65-percent rearward torque bias. This is probably where you’ll want to keep the knob pointed on the street. Auto mode is self explanatory, as are Snow and Tow, but you may be interested to know that Auto provides the cushiest ride while Snow and Tow modes lock the torque distribution at 50/50 front to rear.

We already talked a bit about how the eight-speed transmission improves performance, but it’s also worth mentioning that the gearbox now includes rev matching, meaning the throttle is automatically blipped when downshifting for smoother and quicker shifting. All in, Jeep says its test drivers shaved six-tenths of a second off their lap times due to the upgraded transmission at Nelson Ledges Road Course in Ohio. That’s a massive improvement when talking all-out hot laps.

Braking performance is also very good. Jeep quotes a stopping distance of 116 feet from 60 mph along with a 0-100-0 time of 16.3 seconds. We were only given the opportunity to take the SRT around COTA for two laps at a time, so we can’t say if brake fade will be a significant issue. We can say, though, that the 15-inch rotors with six-piston Brembo calipers at the front and 13.78-inch rotors with four-piston Brembo calipers stopped the heavy SUV with authority over the course of our track time, limited as it was.

Steering the Grand Cherokee SRT, we were reminded how polished the final generation of hydraulic power steering systems have been… because this Jeep is still fitted with one in lieu of the electronic units that are becoming commonplace. As such, you won’t find driver adjustable steering feel or any changes in ratio, which is locked in at 17.5:1. That’s just fine and dandy, though, because the settings chosen by SRT’s engineers for the rack-and-pinion work perfectly well.

Throwing the 2014 SRT into a corner demonstrates a few interesting points. First, there’s hardly any body roll when the vehicle is in Track mode, and second, there’s quite a bit of grip available to be exploited by the driver. It’s easy enough to set the car into a controllable four-wheel drift around sweeping corners, and it’s just as easy to scrub a bit more speed for the sake of quicker exits and lap times. Pick your poison ? either way, you’ll be having way more fun than should be lawful in a block-shaped vehicle weighing 5,150 pounds.

On COTA’s long back straight, the Jeep’s heft and general lack of aerodynamic efficiency becomes apparent as acceleration slows once into triple-digit speeds. That’s not to say it’s actually slow, it’s just not accelerating as fiercely as it does at lower velocities. In any case, we’d wager a paycheck or two that high-speed acceleration significantly improved with the three additional ratios for 2014 compared to previous years, saddled as it was with an aging five-speed unit.

Fuel mileage is not going to be at the top of the target buyer’s list of concerns, but we’re happy to report that the 2014’s estimated ratings of 13 miles per gallon in the city and 19 on the highway are each one mpg better than before. Click the car into Eco mode and those figures improve, according to Jeep, by around six percent. Fear not, hot shoes, full throttle in either Eco or normal modes is the same.

Interior dimensions mirror those of other Grand Cherokee models, with 40.3 inches of legroom up front and 38.6 in the rear. Cargo capacity maxes out at 68.7 cubic feet, or at 35.1 with the rear seats in their full upright and locked positions. You’ll be able to fit four adults inside comfortably, or five if you have to, and they will all enjoy heated seats (cooled up front, too), an attractive and airy cockpit with reasonable visibility and even an optional rear-seat Blu-ray/DVD entertainment system with monitors that swing up from the front seatbacks.

Put another way, strip all the go-fast goodies from the SRT and you’re left with a highly competitive sport utility vehicle. But why in the world would you want to do that? If you’re in the market for a super ‘ute, put your local Jeep dealer on your must-visit list, and make sure you bring at least $62,995 (plus $995 for that pesky destination charge) along with you.

By choosing the Jeep, you’ll be saving more than $20,000 off the price of anything else that might be called competition, vehicles including the BMW X5M or Porsche Cayenne Turbo, and the European contenders boast option prices that will easily put you into a second mortgage if you’re not careful. Yes, those vehicles, along with the Mercedes-Benz ML63 AMG and Land Rover Range Rover Sport Supercharged, may be a little quicker, faster or more powerful. They might boast more brand cachet and they may be more refined than the beast from Jeep. But they won’t be any more practical, and we’re not sure they’re that much more fun, either. Besides, when the automotive discussion turns toward track-biased super-performance sport utility vehicles, fun thrown in the face of conventional wisdom really is the name of the game, don’t you think?

As read on: http://m.autoblog.com/2013/02/25/2014-jeep-grand-cherokee-srt-first-drive-review/?p=1&icid=art_prev

Jeep’s upcoming 5 year plan

Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Machionne presented a five-year plan for the company brands this morning, with Jeep first up on a long day of presentation. Jeep’s head honcho Michael Manley wasted no time in laying out what the foreseeable future will look like for what he calls the “lead global brand” of the company.

Big goals for the next half-decade will include expanding the lineup from five nameplates built in one country, to six nameplates build in six countries. That expansion of models will include both a three-row competitor, and, of course, a small vehicle to slot below Cherokee. The company is also seeking to add a whopping 1,300 dealers over the next few years, to sell all this new metal, and has an aggressive goal of doubling Jeep sales by the time 2018 rolls around.

As expected, that first salvo from the off-road brand will be the debut of the much ballyhooed Renegade small crossover in the third quarter of this year. Jeep has already designated that Renegade will get refreshed for the 2017 model year, as well.

The three-row vehicle in question will be a redux of the Grand Wagoneer nameplate, slated to come to market in the second half of 2018. Manley called the upcoming product the “most premium Jeep we will have ever made,” which sounds promising considering recent product offerings.

2016 will be an unusually important year for Jeep; fitting as it will also mark the company’s 75-year anniversary. An as-yet unnamed C-segment SUV will make its debut in ’16, and the current Cherokee will be due for its mid-cycle refresh as well while both the Patriot and the Compass lines will meet their maker by 2016.

Finally, on to brand cornerstones Wrangler and Grand Cherokee. According to the company, we should expect a completely new Wrangler in the second quarter of 2017, though there is, as of yet, little to no detail on what we should expect. The current Grand Cherokee is slated to get a refresh in the fourth quarter of 2015, before the next generation debuts in the third quarter of 2017.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2014/05/06/jeep-5-year-plan-grand-wagoneer-new-models/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

Six Tips for New Owners of Jeep Brand Vehicles

Welcome to the adventure. Your Jeep® brand vehicle will change the way you travel and, just maybe, the way you live. We’re glad you joined this passionate group of the Jeep brand enthusiasts, and we’re excited to be with you on your next off-roading excursion. To help you get started, here are a few tips for new owners of Jeep vehicles. Enjoy the ride.

1. Get into the culture of Jeep vehicles. People who drive Jeep vehicles are a unique bunch. They crave adventure and the outdoors. They love a good road trip but prefer to go off-roading. They’re equally interested in showing off a shiny new ride or a muddy one. And they drive through life with curiosity and courage.

2. Meet other Jeep brand enthusiasts. Attend events like Jeep Jamboree USA. It’s the quickest way to understand your vehicle and what it’s capable of. Plus, you’re bound to make friends with other likeminded off-roaders.

3. Know your vehicle. To get to know the ins and outs of your new Jeep brand vehicle, read through the owner’s manual and visit Jeep.com for information on everything from taking the top down to maintenance schedules to staying connected with Jeep mobile apps.

4. Know your elements. Off-roading brings you face-to-face with a variety of terrains and challenges. Fortunately, we have a few tips  for tackling the trails, whether you’re rock crawling or driving in sand. And be sure you Get to Know Your Mud — we know you’re anxious to get dirty.

5. Learn your history. Our heritage Jeep blog posts are a great place to start. Discover the Jeep brand’s strong connection to the military, along with the various Jeep vehicles that have ruled the roads and the trails for more than 70 years.

6. Go Anywhere, Do Anything® You’re now ready for the adventure of a lifetime. It’s up to you to carry on the tradition of adventure.

As read on: https://blog.jeep.com/adventures/six-tips-for-new-owners-of-jeep-brand-vehicles/