Archive for the ‘indian motorcycles’ Tag

The Redesigned 2014 Indian Motorcycle

In the decades following its bankruptcy in 1953, Indian Motorcycle was the target of several companies that tried unsuccessfully to revive the storied brand, the leading motorcycle manufacturer of its time.

But now Indian has the financial muscle to make it happen. Polaris (PII), the maker of snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles and Victory motorcycles, bought Indian in 2011 and is moving at full throttle to bring it back to prominence.

Standing in the way is industry giant Harley-Davidson (HOG), a longtime Indian rival back in the day that has amassed a 57% share of the heavyweight cruiser market.
Victory was built 15 years ago as a potential alternative to Harley-Davidson but has amassed only a 5% market share, largely taking a piece out of Japanese competitors Honda (HMC), Yamaha, Suzuki and Kawasaki. Now Indian is taking aim at the market leader, even running a television ad featuring a Harley-Davidson bike sporting a for-sale sign outside the owner’s garage.

Perhaps Indian can pick up where Victory fell short, boasting a brand new motorcycle set to debut early next month and a rich heritage that rivals the lore of Harley-Davidson.
Mike Wolfe, who co-stars alongside Frank Fritz on History Channel’s “American Pickers,” likes Indian’s chances for success in the renewed rivalry.
“Will Indian take Harley-Davidson down to its knees? No, at least not right away,” said Wolfe, a pitchman for Indian who often comes across vintage bikes on his travels across the country. “But now there’s a choice.”

Blending Heritage With Modern Engineering

Founded in 1901, Indian traces its roots to the first American motorcycle. It quickly became the top motorcycle brand, having developed the first-ever V-twin motorcycle and first electric starter. The company built a reputation among everyday bikers, racers and with the military, supplying the U.S. Army with bikes such as the Chief.
When I get one of these, I’m going to be as proud as the guy who bought one in 1948.
– Mike Wolfe, “American Pickers”

The resurrected Indian seeks to combine the styling of yesteryear with modern engineering, exemplified by the 111 cubic-inch Thunder Stroke engine that will power the all-new Chief.

“It’s a phenomenal American story with an entrepreneurial spirit,” said Steve Menneto, Vice President of Motorcycles at Polaris. “We wanted to bring that forward and blend it into what we’re doing with the brand. We want to show riders what we learned from Indian’s history.”

While its heritage is a central part of what Indian is doing, the new Chief isn’t exactly your grandfather’s motorcycle. “We’re going to build bikes into the future,” Menneto added.

Wolfe, whose Antique Archaeology stores are located in LeClaire, Iowa, and Nashville, Tenn., called what Indian is doing “a sort of a double-edged sword,” as the bike builder looks to celebrate its history while “helping people understand there’s an old Indian and a new Indian.”

Menneto compared Indian’s strategy to that of General Motors’ (GM) Chevrolet, which drew on the styling of the late-1960s Camaro when it brought the model back to showrooms for 2010.

The Thunder Stroke—bigger than Harley’s 110 cubic-inch engine—was the first piece of the 2014 Chief that Indian unveiled to kick off its full re-launch. Indian’s 2013 lineup was built around a 105 cubic-inch PowerPlus engine.

Wolfe said the folks at Indian rode the original bikes as much as possible, getting a feel for how the bikes handled, the seat position and other design elements. “They took all of that knowledge with them,” he added.

“We have six or seven styling cues from the 1940s Chief and a new powertrain with the Thunder Stroke,” Menneto said. “We wanted to blend our rich history with a high quality bike and engineering ingenuity.”

Indian’s latest creation will be revealed on Aug. 3 at the 73rd Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in Sturgis, South Dakota. And two days later, the 2014 Indian Chief will be presented to a nationwide audience on “American Pickers.” Indian is also sponsoring Bike Week on the History Channel.

“I get approached by lots of brands, but this makes a lot of sense for me. I feel like I’m knowledgeable, and I’m proud to talk about Indian,” Wolfe said, noting how viewers of his show are familiar with his affection for Indian bikes. “To the average guy, he knows I’m an Indian guy.”

Gunning for Harley-Davidson

The hardest part begins after the re-launch at Sturgis, as Indian hopes an innovative new engine can rev up sales and help the brand reclaim its position as a major player in the motorcycle world.

Victory currently accounts for most of Polaris’s on-road vehicles unit, which saw its sales jump 64% last year to $240 million. Meanwhile, Harley-Davidson has annual sales of $5.6 billion, outpacing the $3.2 billion in total sales recorded by Medina, Minnesota-based Polaris last year.

Regardless, Polaris is the type of company that Indian needed to regain its stature.
“For it to be owned by Polaris is incredible,” Wolfe said. “Other companies had the passion but not the money. They were just pushing the same product forward. Polaris had the wherewithal to launch a completely new bike.”

With a starting price of $18,999, Indian hopes riders will see the value in buying a bike powered by a 111 cubic-inch engine at that price point. Harley’s Road King is comparatively priced at $17,699 but features a 103 cubic-inch engine.

“Our first goal is to make our bikes affordable. It’s premium compared to competitors, but consumers will realize the value they’re getting. The value will come forward quickly,” Menneto said.

Indian’s 2013 Chief Classic, with the 105 cubic-inch PowerPlus engine, starts at a much higher price point at $26,499.

“They’ve made a better bike and dropped the price,” Wolfe said of the soon-to-be-unveiled Chief.

A Harley-Davidson spokesperson said the company takes all competitors seriously, especially its competitors in the U.S. Competition is good for the industry, the spokesperson added.

“No question, Harley-Davidson is an excellent company and tough competition. They’ve owned the market for heavyweight V-twin motorcycles,” Menneto commented. “Indian can be, and is, a viable choice for consumers. We’re strong competition for Harley-Davidson, hopefully for a long time, and they are also strong competition for us.”
At the heart of Indian’s sales effort are independent dealers sprinkled across the U.S. and in international regions like Asia and Europe.

The company is right on schedule with bringing in dealers, Menneto said, and Indian expects to see more dealers show interest after it launches the Chief. He also noted that dealers have confidence in Polaris and its commitment to making Indian a success again.
Indian said it’s on target to have between 120 and 140 U.S. dealers in place by the end of this year.

“Our plan is to have a full dealer network in the U.S. and around the world,” Menneto explained.

Indian had its eyes on a global presence right from the start, pursuing dealers in Europe, Japan, China, India and elsewhere.

The European market presents an interesting opportunity for Indian. Many of the 40,000 Indian bikes used for military service were left behind when U.S. troops left Europe after World War II, Polaris’s most recent annual report noted, so the company expects to see strong interest in the region.

“The market is still growing. It’s still not where it was before 2008, but it’s still growing,” Menneto said, speaking about the overall market for motorcycles. “People are really enthusiastic. They’re passionate. It’s a part of their life. There’s a need for choice in the marketplace, and a lot of enthusiasts are looking for a change.”
And for Wolfe, the history and ingenuity behind Indian makes it a compelling choice.
“People want to feel pride in what they own, I don’t care what it is,” said Wolfe, who has been collecting for the last 25 years. “When I get one of these, I’m going to be as proud as the guy who bought one in 1948.”

Read more: http://www.foxbusiness.com/industries/2013/07/19/indian-motorcycle-takes-aim-at-harley-davidson/#ixzz2a4IycG7W

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POLARIS REPORTS RECORD FIRST QUARTER 2012 RESULTS; EPS INCREASED 27% TO $0.85 ON 25% SALES GROWTH

First Quarter Highlights:

  1. Net income increased 27% to $60.1 million, or $0.85 per diluted share, with sales climbing 25% to $673.8 million, representing a record for first quarter sales and earnings.
  2. Off-Road Vehicle sales increased 30% and On-Road Vehicle sales increased 44% during the 2012 first quarter.
  3. North American retail sales remained strong, increasing 17% in the first quarter compared to a year ago.
  4. Gross profit margins expanded 60 basis points to 28.9% due to manufacturing realignment savings and lower product and warranty costs.
  5. Raising guidance for full year 2012 earnings to a range of $3.85 to $4.00 per diluted share, an increase of 20% to 25% over 2011 based on expected full year 2012 sales growth of 10% to 13%.

 

MINNEAPOLIS (April 18, 2012) — Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII) today reported record first quarter net income of $60.1 million, or $0.85 per diluted share, for the quarter ended March 31, 2012.  By comparison, 2011 first quarter net income was $47.3 million, or $0.67 per diluted share. Net sales for the first quarter 2012 totaled $673.8 million, an increase of 25 percent from last year’s first quarter sales of $537.2 million.

 

“Our record first quarter results reflect not only the continued strength of our business and solid execution of our strategy, but also a healthy start to the year for our end markets,” commented Scott Wine, Polaris’ Chief Executive Officer.  “Retail sales in the North American off-road vehicle and motorcycle industries are off to their best start in years, and through our innovative products and motivated dealers, Polaris continued to gain market share.  We have significant work to do, but as momentum built throughout the first quarter, we gained confidence that 2012 will be another record year for Polaris, as indicated by our increased full year sales and earnings guidance.”

“Sales increased 25 percent during the first quarter 2012, driven by robust sales of our Off-Road Vehicles and motorcycles.  Customer demand for our broad array of RANGER® and RANGER RZR® side-by-side vehicles continues to exceed our expectations, both in North America and our international markets.  Our international sales, which include the recent acquisition of Goupil, grew 20 percent for the quarter in spite of the continuing EU economic uncertainty.  We are well positioned to meet this higher demand, as we have increased production at our Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin plants, while our Monterrey, Mexico plant continues to raise production levels.  In addition, North American dealer inventories remain in line with our previous projections, with decreased ATV inventory year over year and increased side-by-side vehicle dealer inventory to meet the higher demand.  Season-end snowmobile dealer inventory is higher than a year ago due to the poor snowfall, but remains at manageable levels.”

“Looking ahead, strong retail demand in the first quarter and our expectations for the remainder of the year underscores our confidence in raising our full year 2012 guidance for sales and earnings,” continued Wine.  “Cash flow is expected to remain strong and our balance sheet remains solid with $286 million of cash on hand and minimal debt.  Additionally, we are realizing the expected savings from our manufacturing realignment project, which provides support to our ongoing margin expansion efforts.  Given our excellent start, and despite continued caution about the economy in the second half of the year and particularly the fourth quarter, we believe 2012 is shaping up to be another record year for Polaris.”

 

2012 Business Outlook

Based on Polaris’ performance during the 2012 first quarter and projections for the remainder of the year, the Company is increasing its 2012 full year sales and earnings guidance.The Company now expects full year 2012 earnings to be in the range of $3.85 to $4.00 per diluted share, an increase of 20 to 25 percent over earnings of $3.20 per diluted share for the full year 2011.  Sales for the full year 2012 are now expected to grow in the range of 10 to 13 percent.

First Quarter Performance Summary  (in thousands except per share data)

Three Months ended March 31,

Product Line Sales

2012

2011

Change

 Off-Road Vehicles

$ 504,567

$ 388,019

30%

 Snowmobiles

4,647

8,935

-48%

 On-Road Vehicles

64,656

44,908

44%

 Parts, Garments & Accessories

99,880

95,336

5%

Total Sales

$  673,750

$  537,198

25%

Gross Profit

$ 194,963

$ 151,835

28%

Gross profit as a % of sales

28.9%

28.3%

+60 bps

Operating Expenses

$ 110,599

$ 87,538

26%

Operating expenses as a % of sales

16.4%

16.3%

-10 bps

Operating Income

$ 91,547

$ 69,583

32%

Operating Income as a % of sales

13.6%

13.0%

+60 bps

Net Income

$ 60,078

$ 47,310

27%

Net income as a % of sales

8.9%

8.8%

+10 bps

Diluted Net Income per share

$ 0.85

$ 0.67

27%

 

Off-Road Vehicle (“ORV”) sales increased 30 percent from the first quarter 2011 to $504.6 million.  This increase reflects strong market share gains for both ATV and side-by-side vehicles, primarily driven by new product offerings, including the recently introduced RANGER RZR XP4® 900, and increased sales in our military business.  North American consumer ORV retail sales increased mid-twenties percent for the 2012 first quarter from the first quarter last year, with side-by-side vehicle retail sales once again increasing significantly and ATV retail sales increasing double digits percent.  North American dealer ORV inventories for the 2012 first quarter were up slightly from the first quarter of 2011, as additional side-by-sides were shipped to meet increasing demand.  Sales of ORVs outside of North America increased 15 percent in the first quarter 2012 when compared to the first quarter 2011, due to market share gains and positive mix benefit from greater sales of higher priced side-by-side vehicles.

Snowmobile sales totaled $4.6 million for the 2012 first quarter compared to $8.9 million for the first quarter of 2011.  Historically, the first quarter is a slow quarter for snowmobile shipments to dealers.  The North American snowmobile industry finished the selling season in March 2012 with retail sales down less than five percent compared to the prior season, in spite of unusually warm weather and minimal snowfall in many parts of the U.S. Snowbelt regions, whereas Polaris’ retail snowmobile sales for the season were about even with the prior season’s results.  Polaris led the North American industry in market share gains, and recorded its highest season-ending market share since 2004.  Season-end North American dealer inventories for Polaris snowmobiles are higher than last year, but remain manageable given the previous season’s very low dealer inventory levels.  During the first quarter the Company introduced ten new or significantly updated model year 2013 snowmobiles with industry-leading innovation, technology and value, including updated PRO-RMK® models, now lightest in the industry at 417 pounds and an all new version of the legendary Indy model, the new Indy® 600.

On-Road Vehicle sales, comprised primarily of Victory motorcycles, but also including Indian motorcycles and our GEM and Goupil electric vehicles, increased 44 percent over Q1 2011 to $64.7 million.  Notably, the 2011 acquisitions of Indian, GEM and Goupil contributed about half of On-Road Vehicles first quarter revenue growth.  North American industry heavyweight cruiser and touring motorcycle retail sales increased mid-teens percent during the 2012 first quarter compared to the prior year’s first quarter.  Over the same period, Victory North American unit retail sales increased approximately 40 percent, while North American Victory dealer inventory increased slightly versus 2011 levels to support these sales and market share gains.  During the 2012 first quarter the Company began shipments of two new Victory models, the Victory Hard-Ball™ and the new Victory Judge™, an American muscle motorcycle.  Polaris sales of On-Road Vehicles to customers outside of North America, now including Goupil, increased over 100 percent during the 2012 first quarter compared to the prior year’s first quarter.

Parts, Garments and Accessories (“PG&A”) sales increased five percent during the first quarter 2012 compared to the same period last year.  The increase was primarily driven by higher RANGER™ side-by-side vehicle related sales, largely offset by weak snow related PG&A sales due to the unseasonably warm winter.

Gross profit was 28.9 percent of sales for the first quarter of 2012, an increase of 60 basis points from the first quarter of 2011; while over the same period gross profit dollars increased 28 percent to $195.0 million.  The first quarter 2012 increase in gross profit dollars and margin percentage was driven by volume, cost savings from the manufacturing realignment project, continued product cost reduction efforts, lower warranty costs, and higher selling prices, partially offset by commodity cost increases and negative product mix.

Operating expenses for first quarter 2012 grew 26 percent to $110.6 million or 16.4 percent of sales, compared to $87.5 million or 16.3 percent of sales for the first quarter of 2011.  Operating expenses in absolute dollars for the first quarter of 2012 rose primarily due to planned strategic investments and increased research and development activities related to new products under development.

Income from financial services was $7.2 million during first quarter 2012, an increase of 36 percent compared to $5.3 million in the first quarter of 2011, largely due to increased profitability generated from the retail credit portfolios with Sheffield, GE and HSBC.

Non-operating other income was $2.6 million in the first quarter of 2012, as compared to $3.2 million in the first quarter of 2011.  The change in income stems from foreign currency exchange rate movements and the resulting effects on foreign currency transactions and balance sheet positions related to the Company’s foreign subsidiaries from period to period.

The provision for income taxes for the first quarter 2012 was recorded at a rate of 35.1 percent of pretax income compared to 34.5 percent of pretax income for the first quarter 2011.  The higher income tax rate for the first quarter 2012 is primarily due to the United States Congress not yet extending the research and development income tax credit as of March 31, 2012.

Financial Position and Cash Flow

Net cash used for operating activities was $0.7 million for the first quarter ended March 31, 2012 compared to net cash provided by operating activities of $4.8 million for the first quarter of 2011.  The quarter over quarter change in net cash from operating activities is the result of higher net income for the quarter, offset by a higher investment in working capital in the 2012 period, primarily due to the payment of certain accrued compensation liabilities.  Total debt at the end of the first quarter 2012 was $108.1 million.  During the 2012 first quarter, the Company increased its quarterly dividend payment 64 percent to $0.37 per share and paid a total of $25.3 million in dividends to shareholders.  The Company’s debt-to-total capital ratio was 16 percent at March 31, 2012, compared to 34 percent a year ago.  Cash and cash equivalents were $285.9 million at March 31, 2012 compared to $345.9 million for the same period in 2011.

As read on: http://www.polarisindustries.com/en-us/Company/News/Pages/News-Item.aspx?articleID=57

Introducing the 2013 Victory Judge!!

 

Victory reinvented the cruiser riding experience with the premium ride and performance of the Vegas. Now Victory again introduces a high new level of cruiser excitement with the stylish, sport-influenced Victory Judge.

The mid mounted controls put the driver in an active, engaged riding position. The rider is confidently in total command of the bike, and the ergonomics ensure long-riding leg comfort for riders on the open road.
Only Victory offers such distinctive cruiser styling. The Victory Judge is a powerful rolling sculpture showcasing fresh bodywork, blacked-out features, new drag handlebars, a new headlight nacelle and side panels an owner can customize. The Victory ignition cover between the cylinders also features a great new look.
The Victory Judge combines modern high-performance technology with American styling cues of the 1960s muscle car era, such as cast 5-spoke wheels. The 16″ wheels are shod with premium Dunlop Elite II tires with raised white lettering, the perfect look on this cruiser.

 

Beautifully balanced and engineered with a low center of gravity, the Victory Judge is a full-sized cruiser with sporty & performance-oriented handling that instills confidence and delivers an incredibly smooth ride.

 

The pulse of the street beats from within the powerful Freedom® 106/6 V-Twin. Its serves up 113 ft-lbs of torque that lets a rider accelerate through the gnarliest traffic and bask in the freedom of the open road.
Helical-cut gears in the durable, reliable 6-speed transmission deliver consistently smooth shifting. The true overdrive of 6th gear provides a rider with the smoothest highway cruising.
The Freedom® 106/6 V-Twin delivers instant throttle response and outstanding acceleration that gets a rider off the line and through traffic in complete control. Even while cruising in 6th gear, there’s passing power to spare.
Nothing compares to feeling the pavement beneath your tires and watching the heads turn as your ride by on this baby! Make sure to stop by and see for yourself!

2012 Indian Motorcycles – First Look

Polaris Industries bought Indian last April, which hasn’t given the company much time to launch a completely reengineered, all-new line of 2012 Indian motorcycles. So it hasn’t. But three bikes will be offered for 2012: Vintage, Classic and Dark Horse—all three powered by Indian’s 105-inch Powerplus engine. That’s 1720cc in metric terms, running an undersquare  3.96 x 4.25-inch bore and stroke, with two pushrod-activated valves per jug and cooled in the time-honored fashion: air. The Indian Chief Vintage we tested in November, 2009, made 64.5 horsepower at 4550 rpm and 94.1 foot-pounds of peak torque at 3250. And while there were some sweet spots in the rev range with the non-counterbalanced 45-degree V-Twin, our main complaint was serious vibration in the less-sweet spots. According to our Indian PR contact, “over a dozen small improvements primarily on the minor technical side” have been made to the bikes, which we expect means the riding experience will be similar to what it was on our 2009.

MSRP for the top-line model remains in the same rarified ballpark for 2012. The Vintage, which comes with a windshield, a cool fringed leather seat and matching bags (also a removable pillion pad) is $35,999 in solid colors, with optional two-tone paint schemes $900 more. The Indian Chief Classic retails for $26,499 and dispenses with some of the Vintage’s gewgaws and furbelows, while the Dark Horse (matte black) is $27,999. (If those are out of your price range, Indian does have some very nice T-shirts.)

Mark Blackwell, VP of Special Projects at Polaris, informs us that the company is not for now revealing any details about future Indian models, but that the feedback he’s been getting about the acquisition from around the world, including Europe and China, has been “incredibly positive.”

As read on: http://www.cycleworld.com/2011/11/02/2012-indian-motorcycles-first-look/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=2012-indian-motorcycles-first-look

THIS Friday and Saturday the Victory Demo Truck is HERE!

Indian Motorcycles Celebrates 110 at Sturgis

Indian Motorcycle’s entire 2012 lineup will be displayed in Sturgis for the 71st annual motorcycle rally. Indian Motorcycle accessories will also be on display with apparel for purchase. The show truck is located on the corner of 4th and Lazelle Streets in downtown Sturgis

In addition to the events display, Indian Motorcycle is inviting all 1901- 2011 Indian owners to park their motorcycles by the Indian Motorcycle Display to celebrate the 110 years of the company and enjoy the camaraderie of fellow Indian motorcycle owners. Indian Motorcycle Company is proud to sponsor a breakfast and self-guided ride to the Sturgis half-mile flat track races for all Indian Motorcycle Owners. The ride will start with breakfast at the First Presbyterian Church, located at 1319 Junction Ave, Sturgis, South Dakota 57785 between 9:30 a.m.- 10:30 a.m. The ride will leave from downtown Sturgis wind through scenic Spearfish Canyon, ending at the 1/2-mile Flat Track Races in Sturgis. Please join us for a fun day of riding and racing. For more information the flat track races visit www.jackpinegypsies.com.

Indian motorcycle is the featured brand at the Knuckle Saloon, located at 931 1st Street in Sturgis, on Friday, August 12th, starting at 6 p.m. is an Indian gathering. This is open to the public, and we invite Indian Motorcycle owners to show off rides and share some stories.

For more information on the Indian Motorcycle event schedule, dealership locations and openings, the motorcycles, accessories, apparel and gifts visit www.indianmotorcycle.com.

As read on: http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/800/10646/Motorcycle-Article/Indian-Motorcycles-Celebrates-110-at-Sturgis.aspx

More tips for Riding in Extreme Heat

Don’t forget that once the temperature gets above your body temperature (~99°F / ~37°C), you don’t want to be wearing a mesh jacket. You want to zip up all of your vents and keep as much of your skin covered as possible. Hot air hitting your skin at a temperature higher than your body temperature will heat up your skin and dehydrate you faster than you’ll know it’s happening.

Cover your neck with a soaking wet bandana, wet down your T-shirt, and stop often to re-soak both. Drink way more water than you think you’ll need.

Heatstroke is a very real possibility on a motorcycle, and at high temperatures, mesh clothing will not help with this. If you do wear a mesh jacket in these temps, make sure you have a Camelbak or some sort of hydration system, and drink water constantly.
There are two big things at work here.

1.Evaporation and
2.Insulation.
Both deal with sweating. Let’s look at each one separately. But first, a quick primer on sweat.  Sweat happens when your body transfers heat from itself into the air. When sweat evaporates, it cools down the surface of your skin.

OK, on to evaporation. Evaporation can only happen when there’s less moisture in the air than on your skin. So if you are in a big hot stinky swamp pit, evaporation ain’t gonna do much for you. If there is no evaporation happening, your body will stop sweating. This is very bad, and you will soon be very unhappy as your body overheats.

So now you are thinking, “won’t closing your vents ensure that your suit becomes a big hot stinky swamp pit? Aren’t you ensuring that you’ll raise your core temperature too much because your sweat can’t evaporate?” If you are hard-core enough to ride in extremely hot weather when the humidity is high, let’s face it: nothing is going to be a perfect solution. At that point, you get yourself shade and water, and often. Also, assuming you’re touring, try riding at night or at higher elevations. However, in most of our daily lives, this isn’t going to be an issue. No one’s jacket is windproof (we all wish it was, especially in the wintertime!), so unless your idea of gear is Saran Wrap, your skin is going to be able to breathe and your sweat is not going to stop evaporating 100%.

So, on to our second idea: insulation. Earlier, we established that sweat is the body’s way of transferring heat from itself to the air. This can only happen if the air is cooler than the body. Otherwise, the skin will draw heat from the air. Why is this a problem? It’s called vasodilation. The idea here is that as the body heats up, blood vessels enlarge to circulate more blood to the skin. Normally, this is good because the evaporative cooling process cools down the skin, and therefore, the blood. However, if your sweat evaporates too quickly and dries out, the skin absorbs heat from the air, which then actually heats up your blood. Mmm, nice hot blood circulating all over your body—especially up into your brain.

By zipping up your vents, you provide a layer of insulation between your skin and that hot air. By keeping your clothing wet, you augment your sweat and keep your skin (and therefore blood) cool. One thing mentioned in particular is a bandana. You could actually use a Cool Tie, which is a bandana-like tube filled with paraffin crystals that hold water much longer than cotton. In desert conditions,  soak this Cool Tie and wrap it around your neck while riding. It keeps the blood flowing to your brain cool, and helps keep your head on straight. It’s very easy to become confused when in the early stages of heatstroke, and keeping your blood cool is one big way to combat this.

To reiterate that this is only really applicable when the ambient temperature is above your body temperature. Also,  nothing against mesh jackets, but in extreme, 99°F+ / 37°C+, conditions, you have to be prepared to go into desert survival mode, which, includes zipping up vents and keeping the hot air and sun off of your skin. No matter what your opinion on the vents, it should also include frequent stops, lots of water (and/or some sports drink that replaces electrolytes and sugars you loose as you sweat), and lots of shade. If you’re not willing or able to make those sorts of preparations when riding in 99°F+ / 37°C+ weather, take the car or stay home. That isn’t being a big pansy; it’s being smart and safe.

http://www.motorcycletraveling.com/?p=20

Riding Season Hours are HERE!

It’s that Time of Year again!

Dick Scott Classic Motorcycles NEW Riding Season HOURS:
MONDAY: 10AM – 7PM
TUESDAY: 10AM – 7PM
WEDNESDAY: 10AM – 7PM
THURSDAY: 10AM – 7PM
FRIDAY: 10AM – 7PM
SATURDAY: 10AM – 5PM
SUNDAY: 11AM – 3PM
Check out our Website before you come by to take advantage of our Online Savings Offers!

 

Don’t miss Dick Scott Classic Motorcycles …

We will be at the 2011 Progressive International Motorcycle Show
at the Suburban Collection Showplace
(Formerly the Rock Financial Showplace in Novi)

January 7th, 8th and 9th, 2011
Friday, January 7, 4:00pm – 9:00pm
Saturday, January 8, 9:30am – 8:00pm
Sunday, January 9, 9:30am – 5:00pm

The largest motorcycle show series in the world – features hundreds of new bikes, scooters and entertainment for the entire family. The show makes 11 stops across the U.S., allowing powersports enthusiasts from across the country to see the latest and greatest innovations, products and services, as well as the hottest new motorcycles, custom bikes, ATVs, scooters and more.

2nd Annual Charity Ride and Chili Cook-Out

2nd Annual Plymouth Chili Cook-OutDowntown Plymouth was the place to be this past Sunday, October 10th! The Second Annual Chili Cook-Off was a great sucess.

Dick Scott Classic Motorcycles was there along with the Big Dog Demo Truck. We had a fantastic weekend with lots of great events.
It started with the Big Dog Demo Truck at our Canton location Friday and Saturday then we all headed over to the Chili Cook-off Sunday!
The streets were packed with people and lots of amazing Bikes! Visit our Facebook Page to see pictures from this past weekends events!