Archive for the ‘gt-r’ Tag

Can You Really Drive a Nissan GT-R Every Day?

That’s the million – err, $100,000 question isn’t it? Can you really drive a Nissan GT-R every day? You know, to the grocery store, to pick up the kids from school, to grab a burrito? I wanted to find out, so Nissan gave me a brand-new, 2015 GT-R to drive around every day for a week.

With any GT-R, the initial impression is pretty clear — it’s big, it’s comfortable, and it will give you neck problems if you push on the gas hard enough. The thing is blisteringly fast from a standstill. Even at higher speeds, the 3.8-liter V6 pushes it more than I was even willing to.

But forget that impressive power. Forget the 0-60 time. Forget the torque meter and the lap timer. Is the Nissan GT-R really an “everyday supercar” as most people claim? I wanted to find out for myself.

Acquiring Socks

I had to go buy socks. Normally that’s a pretty easy thing to do. Go to the store. Park as close as possible. Acquire socks. Exit quickly. But I’m driving a $100,000 supercar. That means I had to park pretty darn far for these socks.

It’s not so much that the GT-R won’t fit in normal parking spots, or navigate through parking lots. Even when parked out of every possible human being’s way you still expect to walk out and see a giant scratch or dent. Or some a-hole leaning up against it taking pictures. So much anxiety.

And then the gym. I watched it through the window in-between sets.

Mission: Fast Food

Americans love getting fast food. So for the sake of science, I planned to make a quick drive-thru run in the Nissan. But as I pulled up to the entrance, those daunting curbs, that sharp corner, that tall window; I gave up. I went to Chipotle down the street instead.

I felt ashamed. Mostly because of the idea of fast food, but also because I didn’t have enough confidence in myself to make it into that tight space. I just didn’t want to risk a scratch or ding to the rim. Mission: Failed.

To the Park

My initial plan was to get my 17-pound shitzu, and strap her in the passenger seat. Then I remembered that I don’t want Nissan to hate me, so I didn’t do that. Instead, I drove the park sans shitzu to meditate on the spirit of the GT-R/play on the playground. It was quite lovely, actually.

Lo and behold, the GT-R doesn’t have a problem parking in some grassy areas. Again, as long as your park it as far away as humanly possible. I didn’t hoon it, Nissan, I promise.

Junk in the Trunk

The GT-R is a big car, which is sort of weird when you look at the rest of Japanese car culture. It’s got American-sized, comfy leather seats, a back seat fit for amputees, and a ginormous trunk. Ginormagantuan.

I managed to fit a fold up tent, a fold up chair, and a pack of beer in the back with some room to spare. I mean, it took some finagling, but they all fit pretty snuggly. Not bad considering most other supercars in this price range don’t have that much room to boot.

Tongue-in-cheek review aside, I sincerely think you can drive a Nissan GT-R every day. To an extent. Unlike Jalopnik’s Doug DeMuro – who did a similar review with his Ferrari 360 – the GT-R is actually a more practical choice, for about the same price. Go figure. It drives easy, it gets decent enough mpg (16 city/23 highway), and if you take some Xanax you should be fine with leaving it out in public. Just make sure to take her out to her natural habitat – a track – every once in a while.

8/10, would drive every day again.

As read on: http://news.boldride.com/2014/11/nissan-gt-r-review/63113/

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They’re here! Nissan previews two of its sportiest 2015 vehicles, and offers some blasts from the past

What do a classic roadster, diesel-powered crossover, and electric utility van have in common? In this instance, they all have a Nissan badge on their nose – Datsun makes a cameo appearance, too. The NY Daily News Autos drives two of Nissan’s hottest 2015 models, a few tempting European-market cars and trucks, and even classics like the original 240Z.

Nissan has one of the fastest-evolving and diverse lineups in the auto world, with most products in showrooms having been redesigned or updated within the last five years. We recently tried out the most recent additions to the Nissan lineup, and had the rare opportunity to spend time with prototypes, classic cars, and products sold in markets outside the United States.

We were among the first to officially drive the 2015 370Z Nismo, a track-oriented 370Z that unofficially debuted at an owners gathering in May. The ’15 model makes a 7-speed automatic available for the first time on a Z Nismo, and adds Recaro seats and some changes to the chassis tuning.

We drove a Z Nismo equipped with a 6-speed manual and liked the balance of performance enhancements and drivability. (A GT-R, which we drove directly afterward, still felt like a mental, hair-raising machine by comparison.) It may not rival a classic Z car for future desirability, but the Nissan Z remains a great – and sometimes overlooked – choice in the sports car world.

This was also our first drive of the Juke Nismo RS, a fantastic, performance-oriented treatment of the cheeky Juke crossover SUV. A 6-speed manual transmission, on-point steering feel, superb seats, and a surprising amount of turbo oomph make it as fun to drive as it is polarizing to view. Even if you think it looks like a giant frog, the Juke is still fantastically fun to drive.
The Juke Nismo RS is proof that great things can come in small, strange-looking packages.

It was surprising to see Nissan’s first electric van for mass production, the e-NV200, at this event. Based on the vehicle you know better as the Taxi of Tomorrow, the e-NV200 sources its batteries and motor from the Leaf hatchback, resulting in a silent delivery van with a range of about 100 miles.



Its driving position and road manners are van-like, sure, but it accelerates well, and is much quieter than its gas-powered counterpart. The e-NV200 is currently being tested by FedEx, and any future commercial sales are likely to be limited to work fleets.

The teeny-but-not-too-tiny Micra is sold in Canada and Mexico, where it competes with the Mitsubishi Mirage and Fiat 500 as basic urban transportation. It impressed us with its solid fit and finish, punchy 109-horsepower 4-cylinder engine, and high level of equipment. This is no GT-R – or even a Juke, for that matter – but there is merit in its small dimensions, frugal nature, and able chassis.

More forbidden fruit materialized in the form of the Qashqai crossover SUV. Underneath the Qashqai (say cash-kie) is a U.S.-market Rogue, but this particular SUV was equipped with a torquey turbodiesel engine. Don’t hold your breath for that motor to make it here, however. We still like the Qashqai’s elegance, both in and out, and would forgive its slightly louder engine note for the greater returns in efficiency.

Nissan fastidiously keeps running examples of its historic past, including the 1600 Fairlady Roadster seen here. Don’t be fooled by the Broadway-worthy name, because this little car is an absolute driving delight – Julie and Rex would almost definitely give it a standing ovation, in our opinion.


The Fairlady is a light, tossable roadster that does a great impression of similarly small and charming British sports cars. Except unlike the British cars in the 1960s, the Nissan was absolutely reliable (sorry MG and Triumph fans). The Fairlady’s agility is impressive, even though it does without power steering. Once the exhaust’s overrun kicks in around 3000 rpm, you have no choice but to fall in love with this tiny Nissan roadster.

The Fairlady got things rolling, but the original 240Z defined Nissan’s balance of style, performance, and budget-friendly pricing in the ‘70s. This particular 240Z was rehabbed by Nissan in 1996, as part of an official effort to breathe life into the Z brand, despite the temporary discontinuation of the car. That pricey restoration paid off, because this car is sublime to drive!
The wooden steering wheel, slick shifter, light clutch action, and limber chassis make the 240Z as compelling to drive as many modern sports cars. In time, the Z packed on more luxury features, additional power, and extra pounds. The original is the best, and probably the Nissan we’d most like to take back home.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/latest-reviews/nissan-taste-2015-models-back-article-1.1878555#ixzz3ArFWsw9R

2015 Nissan GT-R Nismo first drive

2015 nissan GT-R

 

What is it?

The Nissan GT-R Nismo becomes the halo model within Nissan’s halo lineup. Think of Nismo (Nissan Motorsports) as Nissan’s AMG and you start getting the idea.

The 2015 GT-R Nismo made its debut at the Geneva motor show and has on board damned near every performance part Nissan could throw its way. It starts with the company’s 3.8-liter, twin-turbo V6 massaged to make 600 hp and 481 lb-ft of torque, up 55 hp and 18 lb-ft over your basic GT-R. The Nismo has high-flow turbos similar to the company’s GT3 race cars, the ignition-timing wick has been turned up, roughly 45 pounds have been shed and the four-wheel independent suspension is stiffer. Add it all up, and the result is a claimed 7 minute, 8.679-second Nurburgring lap, among the fastest times for a volume-production car, if that floats your boat.

You’ll know the Nismo when you see it because of its front bumper and carbon spoiler (adding 220 pounds more downforce at 185 mph, Nissan says). Subtle Nismo red striping around the side sills and bumpers is a nice touch. Five colors are offered: red, black, silver, white and matte gray. Those last two look particularly hot. Inside, you’ll find Recaro buckets, red-accented instruments and the company’s multifunction display.

The car starts at about $151,000 and goes on sale at the end of July.

Read more: http://www.autoweek.com/article/20140623/carreviews/140629985#ixzz36nmNr7pZ

Congratulations to Nissan GT-R, Motor Trend’s 2008 Car Of The Year! No other car this year could match the sensation and hype of the Nissan GT-R. Not only was it hyped but it stood behind ever last claim it made. This vehicle accelerates faster, stops faster and runs a track faster than any of it competitors and for a lower price. Nissan has given us an amazing car to sell and we’re honored that it is the 2008 Motor Trend Car Of The Year!

Dick Scott Nissan
Best Shot Dealer

NISMO GT-R

by Tim Joseph

Edmunds said it was the fastest car they’ve ever driven but it’s not fast enough for you! Your new GT-R is here and for the most part you’ve enjoyed every minute of it. If only it could be faster you hear yourself saying over and over.

NISMO (Nissan Motorsports), Nissan’s motorsports and performance division has released a package that may help you. The GT-R NISMO package (only available in Japan at the moment) includes Bilstein adjustable dampers combined with firmer coil springs and a set of 20-inch Rays forged aluminum wheels wrapped in Bridgestone RE070R tires. To make the vehicle lighter the package also includes an exhaust silencer that’s shed 11 pounds, manually adjustable seats with carbon fibre backing and a carbon fibre undertray.

The price tag is set at 5,460,000 yen which is currently $50,074.32. We’ll keep you updated on the package when it comes to America.