Archive for the ‘fca north america’ Tag

Truck Tuesday: 2020 Ram 1500 America’s Half-Ton Diesel Torque Leader

The 2020 Ram 1500 will soon become America’s most powerful half-ton diesel pickup with the introduction of the third-generation turbocharged 3.0-liter EcoDiesel V-6.

480 lb.-ft.of torque and the highest available half-ton diesel towing capacity at 12,560 pounds really set the Ram 1500 apart from the competition. Coupled with the record 1,000 lb.-ft.of torque achieved by the new Ram Heavy Duty, Ram pickups now own the top spots in torque ratings.

The 2020 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel will be available on all models and configurations, including a first-time offering for the Ram Rebel. It goes on sale in the fourth quarter of this year.

Mauro Puglia, Diesel Engine Chief Engineer, FCA North America, goes behind the numbers for a closer look at how this new EcoDiesel engine benchmark was achieved.

Read more at: https://blog.fcanorthamerica.com/2019/06/18/truck-tuesday-2020-ram-1500-americas-half-ton-diesel-torque-leader/?fbclid=IwAR22PtEyTsg3Dw4UXjEh0FjMXwS5HHAHyJjw_-0bLzJbDT2Q2Ok0bngt-5c

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Diverse talent in the spotlight during Black History Month

Over the years, a growing list of diverse FCA US leaders are recognized for their technical achievements, management skills, leadership and community service.

Perhaps the timeliest of these awards are those earned as part of the annual Black Engineer of the Year event held each year in February during the nation’s observance of Black History Month.

And while the event is a great opportunity to celebrate the current accomplishments of several very talented employees, it is perhaps a better opportunity to step back and consider all the FCA US employees of African American ancestry who have earned this important recognition each year for many years.

This year, U.S. Black Engineer & Information Technology magazine awarded its 2019 Black Engineer of the Year Gerald Johnson Legacy Award (BEYA) to Tanya Foutch, Quality Engineering Supervisor, FCA US LLC.

Tanya was named Resident Engineering Supervisor at FCA US transmission plants in Kokomo and Tipton, Indiana, in 2016.  In this role, she leads a team focused on identifying quality issues for the Company’s current and future portfolio of products.

Tanya graduated from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1995 with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering.  She earned a master’s degree in business administration in 2000 from Anderson University in Indiana.

She is an enthusiastic advocate of STEM education for youth in her community and actively engages with and mentors young women interested in pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

Since 2017, Tanya has been the energy and passion behind a successful annual STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) summer camp for youth in the Kokomo area.

Joining Tanya in accepting a BEYA award this year were three FCA US employees who were recognized as Modern Day Technology Leaders for 2019:

  • Mesgana Asmelash – Advanced Drive Assistance Systems (ADAS) Verification & Validation Engineer, Product Development (Electrical Engineering)
  • BranDee Tatum – Maintenance Area Supervisor, Manufacturing (Trenton South Engine Plant)
  • Jasmine Tompkins – Value Optimization Lead, Product Development (Interior)

Last year, Eric Burnett, Automatic Transmission Chief Engineer, FCA US LLC, earned BEYA’s Edward Welburn Legacy Award.

And before Eric, Kristal Fears, Manager – Central Stamping Assembly, FCA US LLC, earned a special recognition award at BEYA.

The achievements of these colleagues, and so many others through the years, deserve our attention and respect as we continue our observance of Black History Month.

Read more at: https://blog.fcanorthamerica.com/2019/02/15/diverse-talent-in-the-spotlight-during-black-history-month/?fbclid=IwAR1FoUHpuS3DlOkL5Ouv2arrJ9j2HJ3m5uzkoouZ6kV_DvnerBvbP-mNECE

Love your engine by checking the oil

The gas station ritual has changed over the years. Today we tend to fill the tank, clear trash out of the door pockets and under the seats, and get going.

One important task has fallen by the wayside – checking the engine oil level.

Oil is the lifeblood of your engine and too little or too much of it can cause serious and expensive damage. Also, regular checking lets you see if the level is falling unexpectedly, an early sign that service is needed.

Checking engine oil is easy and can be done while filling the gasoline tank. You’ll even earn respect from other drivers who see you pop the hood and work the dipstick with authority.

We find it handy to keep a roll of shop towels or paper towels in the car. Not every fuel station puts them out anymore. A shop rag works too. Or, in a pinch, a couple of leftover fast food napkins.

Let the engine sit for a couple of minutes before you check the oil, so go ahead and start the fuel pump and clean out the door pockets. Then pop the hood – the release is usually located on the left edge of the driver’s footwell. Then slide your hand under the front edge of the hood and release the secondary latch to open the hood all the way, using the prop rod to hold it open if your car has one.

The handle for the dip stick is usually topped in yellow plastic and labeled Engine Oil. If you’re not sure, check the owner’s manual for a diagram of its location.

Pull the dipstick out of the tube, grasping the end of the stick with the towel and wiping it clean. Look at the end of the stick and see the high and low marks that define the safe zone for the oil level.

Slide the dipstick back into the tube and push it all the way in until the handle seats. Now pull the dipstick out, again grab toward the end with the towel and look at where the oil level shows:

  • If it’s inside the safe zone, between the marks, all is good so put the dipstick fully back into the tube, close the hood and wipe your hands clean.
  • If the oil level is at or below the bottom mark of the safe zone, it’s time to add a quart of oil. Check the oil fill cap or the owner’s manual for the correct grade, such as 5W-20, and use that oil.
  • If the oil level is above the top mark of the safe zone you should take your vehicle in for service as soon as possible.

Many of today’s vehicles also have an oil life monitor that lets you know when it’s time to change the oil. When you get the signal, have the oil changed – old, dirty oil can lead to engine damage.

It’s easy and quick to check your engine oil. You’ll drive with confidence knowing your engine is maintained to perform as designed.

Read more at: https://blog.fcanorthamerica.com/2018/10/09/love-your-engine-by-checking-the-oil/