Archive for the ‘ecodiesel’ Tag

Grand Cherokee diesel on the road

While it’s been neglected by most people in favor of the Ram 1500 diesel, the Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel was the first Chrysler vehicle sold in North America to have the VM 3.0 V6 engine.  We tested this briefly at a Chelsea, Michigan test track, and found it to be instantly responsive, more so than the Hemi — which has far better acceleration numbers, but doesn’t respond quite as quickly to the throttle.

Chrysler has dabbled in diesels as a non-hybrid solution to large fuel-economy boosts, but applications have been limited so far partly due to cheap gasoline and high premiums for diesel engines. The diesel, which uses compression rather than spark to ignite fuel, is much more expensive to build, partly due to the extremely high pressures involved, and partly because of the need to control small particles in the exhaust which have been reliably and consistently linked to cancer. The current popular methods of dealing with emissions controls are diesel emissions fluid (DEF) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR).

The company may be able to add more diesels soon, if the next generation VM and Fiat four cylinders prove to be suitable. A Fiat 3-liter four-cylinder is due to appear soon on the ProMaster van, for example, though this has been deemed unsuitable for “civilian” cars.

Allpar has added a second Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel test, by Daniel Bennett, to our existing Bill Cawthon road test. The article also includes an analysis of the payback time. It’s worth noting that diesels tend to have less of a fuel economy reduction when towing or carrying heavy loads than gasoline engines.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/12/grand-cherokee-diesel-on-the-road

The diesel-powered Dodge Ram 1500

I bought a new test truck, and there was much rejoicing. Celebration for the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel, the first half-ton diesel truck in more than 25 years, goes far beyond the yard work needs of the Consumer Reports auto test staff.

Evidence of this came from very strong initial orders from dealers, with customers practically lining up to buy. We saw this firsthand as we tried to buy our diesel Ram. Getting our hands on a truck took several weeks, and it was a challenge to find one that wasn’t super-loaded with options.

Even taking that into account, our Ram wasn’t cheap. Not even close. We opted for a midevel Big Horn Crew Cab 4×4 with the shorter of the two bed length choices. Adding the diesel ramps upped the price by a cool $4,000.

After that, our truck is packed with many nice options—$6,000 of them. A $410 integrated trailer brake controller and towing mirrors seem to be a natural match for the diesel’s talents. We’re also big fans of the $505 Uconnect 8.4 touch-screen infotainment system. Once you have experienced heated front seats and a heated steering wheel, it’s hard living without them here in New England. There goes another $395. We regretted not getting a $595 backup camera with park assist on our last Ram, so this one has it.

Added all up, our truck was sticker priced at $49,155. That seems like a lot for a truck with cloth seats. Most trucks seem to be priced to reflect the inevitable thousands of dollars in incentives as manufacturers fight for dominance in truck sales wars. Even though we still got some money off, buying the first one on the block that wasn’t presold didn’t help bargaining.

We’ve called the Ram 1500 “the luxury truck” among its peers, and the diesel makes it even more civilized. Compared to the Hemi’s roar and burble, the diesel goes about its business unobtrusively. The torquey powerplant sounds quieter here than in our tested 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel. Power flows out smoothly, thanks to the eight-speed automatic transmission, but the 240-horsepower EcoDiesel lacks the acceleration of the Hemi. It will be curious to see how the diesel does when towing; we were impressed by how the Jeep pulls a load.

The biggest question: how good is the fuel economy? According to the trip computer, I got 25 mpg overall on my commute. I’ve never broken 20 mpg on the same route with a Hemi-powered truck or SUV. Instrumented testing will come after the truck gets break-in miles; it had less than 100 miles on it when I drove it. It also had a bed full of brush—like I said, all of us at the track have a lot of yard work to do—but it’s unlikely those picked up sticks mattered here.

I also found some surprises. Despite all of those options, including various “comfort” and “luxury” packages, our truck lacks automatic climate control. Also, since it’s quite a stretch to jump up into the bed to unload yard debris, I was surprised there’s no step or ladder. Our truck was certainly shiny at delivery, but the dealer didn’t fill up either the diesel tank or the diesel emissions fluid tank. (We do like the analog gauge that shows the fluid level.)

Maybe the biggest surprise: Our truck’s 1,233 pound payload rating is pretty modest. With its 3.55 rear axle ratio, the truck can tow 7,750 pounds. Say you tow a 6,500-pound camper; it will probably have 650 pounds of tongue weight, leaving you with less than 600 pounds of capacity for your kids and stuff in the truck.

Still, this is a rather impressive and quite refined machine. Of course, many of the Ram 1500’s attributes remain intact here, such as best-in-class ride from the rear coil spring suspension, comfortable front seats, and a roomy cab. In the weeks ahead, we’ll see if this diesel-burning Ram can outscore the Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra at the top of our truck ratings.

Read more at: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2014/05/dodge-ram-1500-ecodiesel-first-drive-review/index.htm

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT

Let’s talk asses for a moment. What do they have to do with the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, you ask?

Well, we’re here to tell you that this SRT can haul some. Lots of them, as a matter of fact: Jeep has increased the towing capacity of its most powerful SUV to 7,200 pounds. Assuming the average donkey weighs about 400 pounds, the Grand Cherokee SRT can haul ass to the tune of 18 burros, give or take a covered trailer or so, which is significantly more than it could in previous years. In 2013, the machine could manage 5,000 pounds, while the first generation was rated at just 3,500. The increase is mostly attributable to a new eight-speed automatic transmission and beefier rear axle, and it’s a welcome update for those who’d like to use their SUV as, well, an SUV with an emphasis on utility.

You’ll be pleased to know that this isn’t the only kind of ass hauling the 2014 Grand Cherokee SRT is capable ? it can also accelerate really, really quickly ? 0-60 in 4.8 seconds to go along with quarter mile times in the low 13-second range and a top speed of 160 miles per hour. That’s extraordinary for a vehicle of this ilk ? and the run to 60 matches that of the last-gen model despite an extra shift taking place due to the new gearbox. Passing performance is even more impressive, as evidenced by a 35-75 mph sprint that’s almost four seconds quicker than it was last year, again, thanks to the extra three gears in the transmission. It goes without saying that the 470 horses grazing on premium unleaded and spitting out 465 pound-feet of torque are also responsible for these accelerative antics, along with the full-time four-wheel-drive system called Selec-Track, which provides more traction than the most stubborn mule in the animal kingdom.

We’ve been rather fond of previous versions of this menacing machine, and with a slew of meaningful enhancements on the menu for the 2014 model year, we took to the track at the brand-new and most excellent Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas at the invitation of Jeep to find out just how Grand the iconic Cherokee nameplate has become.

We’ll start with the styling. “Aggressive” is the word that best describes the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, from its massive 20-inch wheels ? a different pattern than last year’s controversial “Spider Monkey” alloys is now available ? wrapped in Pirelli P-Zero P295/45/ZR20 tires (Pirelli Scorpion Verde all-seasons are also available) to the unique blacked-out front fascia dominated by Jeep’s traditional seven-slat grille. Viewed in profile, there aren’t too many clues to the casual onlooker, besides the massive wheels, of course, that this isn’t your average SUV. But look a little closer and you’ll see details like blacked-out headlight clusters with LED surrounds and a deeply scooped hood with functional heat extractors ? telltale signs that this mule is built to haul.

Even if you happen to be behind this brutish ‘ute, it will be impossible to miss Jeep’s SRT ? if the unique rear fascia doesn’t tip you off, the rumble emanating from the dual exhaust tips is sure to seal the deal. The soundtrack belted out by the massive 6.4-liter Hemi V8 will stir the souls of all those enamored with big displacement and natural aspiration ? you can count us among that group ? just as surely as it will irritate your grandparents on long highway slogs.

If nothing else, looking at and listening to the Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT proves that SRT CEO Ralph Gilles isn’t just blowing smoke when he says that the brand is “Unapologetically selling high performance.”

It’s also worth noting that the rear glass is no longer separate from the rest of the tailgate. Jeep says the change makes the piece lighter while improving rear visibility. That’s all true, but the ability to stick long objects out the back without a fully erect lid is now lost, though that may at least partially be forgiven since the tailgate is now power operated.

The look inside the cabin has also been fine-tuned for performance drivers. Carbon fiber trim replaces the wood accents found in less powerful Grand Cherokee models, and the so-called Laguna leather and suede seating surfaces are nice and grippy. New for the model year is a dual-pane panoramic sunroof option. Oh, don’t forget the bright red engine start/stop button. Racy!

SRT’s new-for-2014 steering wheel deserves mention. According to Gilles, the automaker purchased wheels of high-performance models hailing from the likes of Audi, BMW and Porsche to make sure its wheel, one of the most tactile parts of the driving experience, is truly world class. As far as we’re concerned, SRT has nailed it ? the wheel is nice and meaty where your hands want to rest, and the buttons and controls don’t get in the way while driving. Similarly, the big metal paddle shifters on either side of the wheel are easy to locate and feel good to the touch.

Along with the new transmission comes a new shifter. Shaped like a traditional T, the lever is now fully electronic, with separate detents when moving from Park to Reverse, Neutral or Drive. As with all such doohickeys, this one takes some time getting comfortable with, but it eventually becomes a non-issue. Directly behind the shifter is a rotating knob with settings labeled Track, Sport, Auto, Snow and Tow, and just to the right of that is a button labeled Launch. We’ll talk more about these bits and pieces later.

The biggest changes to the interior are the new 8.4-inch Uconnect central infotainment system, of which many Autoblog staffers voted tops in its category when it won the AOL Technology of the Year Award for 2012, and the seven-inch customizable display in the gauge cluster.

For the 2014 model year, Chrysler is introducing Uconnect Access Via Mobile, which includes navigation and apps like Aha Radio, Pandora, iHeart Radio and Slacker, plus safety features that include an embedded cellular chip that can contact emergency services; remotely lock, unlock or start the car; and alert the owner of a possible theft.

The entire Uconnect system can now be activated using voice commands, from switching radio stations, changing climate settings, answering or making phone calls or calling upon the cloud using Bing search for directions, places of interest or phone numbers. Drivers can also send and receive text messages if they have connected their phone via Bluetooth.

Since this is an SRT model, the center screen also displays performance data. For instance, the driver can call upon a series of gauges to monitor the vehicle’s vital signs, a graphic display of the car showing the g-forces from every direction, lap times or current and best acceleration and braking figures.

Directly in front of the driver is a new seven-inch instrument cluster screen that can electronically display things like the car’s speed, current powertrain and suspension settings, trip information, fuel economy, radio settings and plenty more.

Now that we’re familiar with our surroundings, it’s finally time to hit that big red button to start the engine.

You might think that driving the 2014 Grand Cherokee SRT is all about the engine… and you wouldn’t necessarily be wrong.

The grunt underhood does indeed dominate the driving experience, and we mean that in the best way possible. Acceleration from a dead stop is effortless up to freeway speeds and beyond, though you won’t be lighting up the rear tires as with other products from SRT. Instead, instant all-wheel-drive traction is the name of the game, and holeshot starts are as easy as touching the Launch button we mentioned earlier.

One press puts the car into a predetermined mode that optimizes everything for straight-line acceleration. The suspension hunkers down, the transmission goes into its sportiest programming mode and the engine settles into a 2,000-rpm hum. Let your foot off the brake while mashing the throttle, and you’ll be to 60 mph in well under five seconds, each and every time, so long as you’re not driving on something as slick as snow, mud, snot or marbles.

Assuming you’re interested in more than just pin-your-passengers-back antics, we suggest you investigate the dial to the right of the Launch button. If you’re driving at a track, there’s a dedicated mode that takes as many of the electronic nannies away as Jeep’s engineers felt was safe, including the removal of anything that would take full power away from the engine, along with a torque split that sends 70 percent to the rear tires. There’s still roll mitigation and some small level of traction control, however, and that’s likely a good thing for everyone but professional race car drivers.

Sport mode adds some of those failsafe features back into the mix, but still allows enough wheelspin to make an aggressive driver feel fast while still being under control with a 65-percent rearward torque bias. This is probably where you’ll want to keep the knob pointed on the street. Auto mode is self explanatory, as are Snow and Tow, but you may be interested to know that Auto provides the cushiest ride while Snow and Tow modes lock the torque distribution at 50/50 front to rear.

We already talked a bit about how the eight-speed transmission improves performance, but it’s also worth mentioning that the gearbox now includes rev matching, meaning the throttle is automatically blipped when downshifting for smoother and quicker shifting. All in, Jeep says its test drivers shaved six-tenths of a second off their lap times due to the upgraded transmission at Nelson Ledges Road Course in Ohio. That’s a massive improvement when talking all-out hot laps.

Braking performance is also very good. Jeep quotes a stopping distance of 116 feet from 60 mph along with a 0-100-0 time of 16.3 seconds. We were only given the opportunity to take the SRT around COTA for two laps at a time, so we can’t say if brake fade will be a significant issue. We can say, though, that the 15-inch rotors with six-piston Brembo calipers at the front and 13.78-inch rotors with four-piston Brembo calipers stopped the heavy SUV with authority over the course of our track time, limited as it was.

Steering the Grand Cherokee SRT, we were reminded how polished the final generation of hydraulic power steering systems have been… because this Jeep is still fitted with one in lieu of the electronic units that are becoming commonplace. As such, you won’t find driver adjustable steering feel or any changes in ratio, which is locked in at 17.5:1. That’s just fine and dandy, though, because the settings chosen by SRT’s engineers for the rack-and-pinion work perfectly well.

Throwing the 2014 SRT into a corner demonstrates a few interesting points. First, there’s hardly any body roll when the vehicle is in Track mode, and second, there’s quite a bit of grip available to be exploited by the driver. It’s easy enough to set the car into a controllable four-wheel drift around sweeping corners, and it’s just as easy to scrub a bit more speed for the sake of quicker exits and lap times. Pick your poison ? either way, you’ll be having way more fun than should be lawful in a block-shaped vehicle weighing 5,150 pounds.

On COTA’s long back straight, the Jeep’s heft and general lack of aerodynamic efficiency becomes apparent as acceleration slows once into triple-digit speeds. That’s not to say it’s actually slow, it’s just not accelerating as fiercely as it does at lower velocities. In any case, we’d wager a paycheck or two that high-speed acceleration significantly improved with the three additional ratios for 2014 compared to previous years, saddled as it was with an aging five-speed unit.

Fuel mileage is not going to be at the top of the target buyer’s list of concerns, but we’re happy to report that the 2014’s estimated ratings of 13 miles per gallon in the city and 19 on the highway are each one mpg better than before. Click the car into Eco mode and those figures improve, according to Jeep, by around six percent. Fear not, hot shoes, full throttle in either Eco or normal modes is the same.

Interior dimensions mirror those of other Grand Cherokee models, with 40.3 inches of legroom up front and 38.6 in the rear. Cargo capacity maxes out at 68.7 cubic feet, or at 35.1 with the rear seats in their full upright and locked positions. You’ll be able to fit four adults inside comfortably, or five if you have to, and they will all enjoy heated seats (cooled up front, too), an attractive and airy cockpit with reasonable visibility and even an optional rear-seat Blu-ray/DVD entertainment system with monitors that swing up from the front seatbacks.

Put another way, strip all the go-fast goodies from the SRT and you’re left with a highly competitive sport utility vehicle. But why in the world would you want to do that? If you’re in the market for a super ‘ute, put your local Jeep dealer on your must-visit list, and make sure you bring at least $62,995 (plus $995 for that pesky destination charge) along with you.

By choosing the Jeep, you’ll be saving more than $20,000 off the price of anything else that might be called competition, vehicles including the BMW X5M or Porsche Cayenne Turbo, and the European contenders boast option prices that will easily put you into a second mortgage if you’re not careful. Yes, those vehicles, along with the Mercedes-Benz ML63 AMG and Land Rover Range Rover Sport Supercharged, may be a little quicker, faster or more powerful. They might boast more brand cachet and they may be more refined than the beast from Jeep. But they won’t be any more practical, and we’re not sure they’re that much more fun, either. Besides, when the automotive discussion turns toward track-biased super-performance sport utility vehicles, fun thrown in the face of conventional wisdom really is the name of the game, don’t you think?

As read on: http://m.autoblog.com/2013/02/25/2014-jeep-grand-cherokee-srt-first-drive-review/?p=1&icid=art_prev

2016 Jeep Wrangler To Get Diesel Engine

Just the Facts:

– Jeep plans to boost the Wrangler’s fuel economy with the introduction of a diesel engine.
– A freshening is planned for the Wrangler when the diesel goes on sale.
– No word on pricing, but the diesel likely will be costly.

AUBURN HILLS, Michigan — Jeep Wrangler enthusiasts who have been asking for a diesel engine will get their wish in about two years.

The diesel will be available in the 2016 Wrangler, which will debut in 2015.

“The engine will be introduced toward the end of the model’s lifecycle to boost sales before they bring in the redesigned model,” according to an industry source who asked not to be identified.

At the same time, the 2016 Wrangler will be freshened, possibly with new interior trim and exterior colors.

Automakers sometimes introduce new technology or a new engine to create a buzz for a model that is nearing maturity. In particular, diesel engines are being added by automakers because of rising fuel prices and a government mandate for better fuel economy.

The specifics about the Wrangler’s diesel engine are unclear, although it is likely to be the same engine that is optional in the 2013 Ram pickup and 2014 Grand Cherokee.

The Grand Cherokee is available with a turbocharged 3.0-liter Ecodiesel V6 that is mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. The V6 is produced by VM Motori, an Italian engine maker in which Fiat holds a stake.

The engine produces 240 horsepower and 420 pound-feet of torque. The Grand Cherokee’s fuel economy is rated at 21 mpg city and 28 mpg highway for the model and 30 mpg highway for the 4×2. Sales begin this spring.

A diesel engine is a pricey option. Jeep is asking a $4,500 premium for the Grand Cherokee’s diesel engine, making it $2,305 more expensive than the Hemi V8.

In addition, depending on the state, the price of diesel per gallon can be considerably higher than gasoline.

The AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report on Friday pegged the average price for a gallon of diesel fuel at $4.13 versus $3.77 for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline.

Edmunds says: It no surprise a diesel engine is planned. After all, both consumers and the feds are demanding the same thing — better mpg.

As read on: http://www.edmunds.com/car-news/2016-jeep-wrangler-to-get-diesel-engine.html

2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel Exceeds Expectations

Earlier this month, MotorTrend released its annual Truck of the Year Award and, to its own shock, gave the award to the 2014 Ram 1500, which also won Truck of the Year in 2013. Why did this announcement come as a surprise to the people at MotorTrend? Well, perhaps because the publication has not given the Truck of the Year Award to the same vehicle in back to back years since the award started in 1979.

Knowing this information, one should not be surprised that the 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel received 8,000 orders between February 7 and February 10. That is, unless you are the manufacturers of said vehicle.

The 8,000 orders placed for the 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel has already fulfilled the allotment Chrysler established for the truck in the first quarter of 2014. The 8,000 orders for the EcoDiesel also represent more than 50 percent of the total orders for the 2014 Ram 1500, more than doubling the estimates by Chrysler. Ram Truck Brand President and CEO Reid Bigland had previously estimated that the EcoDiesel would account for approximately 30 percent of the total sales of the 2014 Ram 1500.

The surge in sales is most likely a direct result of the most recent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fuel mileage test results for the truck which showed that the 2014 Ram 1500 gets 28 mpg on the highway, better than any other full-sized, half-ton pickup on the road – and even better than the top-rated small pickup.

“The Ram 1500 is the only half-ton truck available with a diesel, so we see this as incremental business by having the only truck that can offer best-in-class fuel economy of 28 MPG combined with 9,200 lbs. of towing capacity. It’s every truck manufacturer’s dream to have this kind of initial order demand for a product. Fuel economy is the No. 1 request of half-ton buyers and the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel delivers without compromising capability,” stated Bigland.

Fortunately, consumer orders will receive priority over dealership orders. While Chrysler pegged the initial allotment at 8,000 orders, signs indicate that this number could increase if customer, not dealer, demand increases.

If interested, one can place an order for a 2014 Ram 1500 at any local Chrysler or Dodge dealer for the price of $24,200. However, if one wants the EcoDiesel engine, it will add another $2,850 to the total price.

As read on: http://www.webpronews.com/2014-ram-1500-ecodiesel-exceeds-expectations-2014-02

Nissan shows diesel-Frontier truck

Chicago — Nissan Motor Co. on Thursday showed off a concept diesel-powered version of its Frontier mid-size pickup at the Chicago Auto Show and said it will wait for feedback from customers before deciding whether to build it.

“It’s a technical study. We’re going to use social media — Facebook, Twitter, so forth and the blogosphere to find out what people are saying about this truck, ‘Do they like it? Do they want it? Should we build it?” and we’re going to let them decide for us, basically,” said Fred Diaz, senior vice president for sales and marketing at Nissan’s U.S. unit.

Last month, Diaz said the company was considering building a hybrid version of the next generation Frontier.

The demonstration Nissan Frontier Diesel Runner gets an estimated fuel economy increase of 35 percent over the current Frontier V6.

In August, Nissan announced it would sell a 5.0-liter turbo diesel V8 in the next-generation Titan full-size pickup, which will arrive in 2015.

“Frontier continues to be a huge success story for us, with more than 60,000 units sold in 2013,” Diaz said. “Nissan has always valued the mid-size pickup segment, and with this technical study project, we are looking to explore what is possible for the next-generation Frontier.”

This week, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV said its new 2014 Ram 1500 diesel pickup will earn a 28 miles-per-gallon highway rating, the best of any full-size half-ton pickup.

The 2013 Ram with a 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 gasoline engine earned a 25 mpg highway rating.

The smaller pickup segment has been shrinking, although General Motors Co. announced last month it was re-entering the segment — a market that Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV have both exited. GM also said it plans to sell a diesel version of its small Canyon and Colorado in the 2016 model year. The GM midsize trucks will go on sale this fall.

Sales in the segment fell 15 percent last year and are down by 75 percent over the last 15 years. Honda Motor Co. and Toyota Motor Corp. also both sell mid-size trucks.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140206/AUTO0104/302060118#ixzz2t7R55iUr

Ram diesel trucks “most durable;” 25 years of Cummins

Given the reputation of Cummins as a maker of bullet-proof diesel engines, it is hard to be surprised by Ram’s announcement today that their Cummins-powered trucks are Canada’s most durable diesel pickups.

The first Cummins-powered light-duty pickups (confusing called “heavy duty” or “super duty” by GM, Chrysler, and Ford) appeared in 1989, immediately boosting Dodge pickup sales. The current version of the Cummins B-series engine is far more powerful than in those early days, and has increased in displacement from 5.9 to 6.7 liters; they now produce up to 385 horsepower and 850 lb-ft of torque, more than any competitor.

Ram chassis cabs with the Cummins diesel reach 37,500 lb of gross combined weight ratings; the Ram Heavy Duty has a class-leading 30,000 lb of towing capacity. The engine is the only one shared by heavy equipment and light-duty pickup trucks; it uses an iron head (rather than aluminum), with 30%-40% fewer moving components than competitors.

Ram uses three versions of the engine; the first is paired with a segment-exclusive six-speed manual transmission, which has  a wear-compensating clutch. The diesel is rated at 350 horsepower at 2,800 rpm and 660 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,400 rpm with this transmission. Coupled to the 68RFE six-speed automatic transmission, it is rated at 370 horsepower at 2,800 rpm with an unsurpassed in ¾-ton trucks 800 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,600 rpm. Finally, with the Aisin wide-ratio six-speed automatic transmission (AS69RC), the Cummins is rated at 385 horsepower at 2,800 rpm, with best-in-class torque of 850 lb.-ft. at 1,700 rpm.

The “most durable” claim comes from a study showing the percentage of Canadian diesel pickups sold within the last 20 years that are still on the road, by brand.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/02/ram-diesel-trucks-most-durable-25-years-of-cummins

Ram diesel: official mileage

The 2014 Ram 1500 pickup, powered by the VM 3-liter V6 (also used in Jeep Grand Cherokee), set a best-ever full-size-pickup 28 mpg in EPA highway testing, neatly beating all current mid-size and full-size pickups. Before the diesel, the best full-size pickup highway mileage was set by Ram 1500 V6.

The half-ton pickup also set a new combined city/highway benchmark of 23 mpg, matching the best four-cylinder midsize pickup’s record. The Ram 1500 diesel  is rated at 20 city, 28 highway, and 23 combined, where the Toyota Tacoma, with a four-cylinder engine and manual transmission, is rated at 21 city, 25 highway, 23 combined. Ram 1500 easily beat the Nissan Frontier and Honda Ridgeline midsize pickups, as well as all Ford, Toyota, GM, and Nissan full-size trucks.

Ram chief Reid Bigland said, “To put the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel in context, it gets 6 mpg better fuel economy than the best F150 EcoBoost. Overall, the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel has outstanding pick-up truck capability with compact car-like fuel economy.”

Ordering will begin on February 7, in all 50 states (and presumably in Canada).

The engine delivers peak torque unsurpassed among V-6 pickups (420 lb-ft). Ram 1500 remains the only pickup with eight-speed automatics, and the only half-ton pickup with an optional diesel.

Torque is higher than the base F-150 V8 and Silverado 1500 V8s , both rated at 15 city, 21 highway; and the Ram Hemi, rated at 14/20 with six-speed, and 15/22 with eight-speed.  (The base Nissan Titan V8 is rated 13/18, while the base Tundra V8 is 15/19).  The Ram 1500 diesel is rated to tow 9,200 lb.

The engine’s block and bedplate are made from lightweight Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI); it uses Fiat’s highly praised MultiJet 2 common-rail fuel-injection system, whose high-dispersion nozzles and servovalve can accommodate up to eight fuel-injection events per cylinder cycle. This mitigates noise and improves low-speed throttle response, while cutting fuel consumption and emissions. Other features include Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), high-pressure cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), variable swirl intake ports, and a variable-geometry turbocharger (pioneered by Chrysler with the 2.2 Turbo IV).

One of Ward’s 10 Best Engines for 2014, the EcoDiesel V-6 was a major factor in the Ram 1500’s selection as 2014 Motor Trend Truck of the Year.  Powertrain chief Bob Lee said, “We are immensely gratified by achieving these milestones. Not only do they confirm our position as an industry leader in powertrain development and truck design, they promise tremendous benefits for our customers.”

The truck also has a thermal-management system that quickly warms transmission oil to reduce pumping losses associated with cold, low-viscosity fluid, active grille shutters, electric power steering, and aluminum for components, such as hoods, “that do not compromise capability.”

The diesel engine adds $2,850 to the cost of the 2014 Ram 1500, which starts at $24,200; the diesel includes the eight-speed automatic, but even without that, the “diesel premium” is far lower than with the hefty Cummins diesel available on Ram 2500-5500. The truck has a five-year /100,000-mile powertrain warranty and three-year / 36,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty.  It is built in Warren, Michigan (which has assembled more than 12.5 million trucks since it started operations in 1938) except for regular cabs, which are made in Saltillo, Mexico. VM engines are made in Cento, Italy, while the eight-speed automatics are made in the United States.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/02/ram-diesel-official-mileage

Diesels and minivan hybrids

Sergio Marchionne said that the first production Chrysler hybrids would be minivans; and that Windsor had not yet been selected as the factory which will build them. Windsor “has one of the best workforces around,” but with over a billion dollars of investment needed, the company is still depending on negotiations with the Canadian government before making a final decision.

The first one out will be a Chrysler. “What comes out as a Dodge, I’m not willing to answer.”

The company loses around $14,000 on each Fiat 500e electric car it sells, but needed to develop the technology.

For diesels, the main challenge is the additional cost. The company is focusing on the largest, heaviest vehicles, because those tend to have the largest benefits. “The benefit of diesel will probably run its course through about 2018” unless they can reduce the emissions cost-effectively. The company is working on emissions reductions.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/01/minivans-hybrids-and-the-diesels

Meet the Diesels | EcoDiesel and Cummins®: A Family of Power and Performance

The new 2014 Ram EcoDiesel and the Cummins® Turbo Diesel are part of a family tradition of powerful and dependable Ram Trucks engines. No matter the task at hand, these diesel engines stand behind small business owners to perform when performance is needed most.
3.0 Liter EcoDiesel V6 Engine

When it comes to the new 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel, there is not a competitor in sight. The 3 liter EcoDiesel boasts a best-in-class fuel economy of better than an estimated 25 miles per gallon, and also has a best-in-class tow rating of 9,300 pounds, topping all base V6 engines in the segment—approaching large V8 capability with 53 percent of the displacement.

How does EcoDiesel achieve this tow rating? Ram Trucks powertrain engineers modified the transmission parking lock inside the exclusive eight-speed TorqueFlite 8 for a higher load rating under hill-hold conditions, allowing for a greater tow rating. Our engineers didn’t stop at towing, though. The EcoDiesel delivers a best-in-class 420 lb-ft of torque, and delivers LESS CO2 into the environment. This truck is equipped with diesel oxidation catalyst, diesel particulate filter and selective catalyst reduction, making the EcoDiesel V6 engine emissions compliant in all 50 states.

Not to mention, the EcoDiesel is B-20 BioDiesel capable, and Biofuel produces fewer air pollutants and less greenhouse gas emissions, making the EcoDiesel V6 engine the cleanest light-duty engine available.
6.7 Liter Cummins® V8 Turbo Diesel Engine

The Ram Heavy-Duty 6.7 liter Cummins® Turbo Diesel I6 is also B-20 fuel capable, while boasting 385 horsepower and a best-in-class 850 lb-ft of torque.

For the hardest jobs, Ram Trucks with the Cummins® Turbo Diesel feature a new cooling system for improved performance and durability, and a best-in-class 15,000-mile oil-change interval will allow you to focus on the task at hand while knowing your vehicle is in it for the long haul.

Among other highlights are the next-generation selective catalytic reduction and diesel exhaust fluid system with a range of up to 4,000 miles between refills, as well as the dual fuel filtration system for enhanced reliability and durability in virtually every climate and environment. And if all that’s not enough, this engine offers an unsurpassed powertrain warranty—five years/100,000 miles.

How do you know which of these highly capable engines is the right choice for you? Visit Dick Scott Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram or Dick Scott Motor Mall to discuss the benefits of each powertrain relative to the business that you’re in.

As read on: http://blog.chryslercommercialvehicles.com/2013/10/28/meet-diesels-ecodiesel-cummins-family-power-performance/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_campaign=CSOct2813Facebook2&ism=CSOct2813Facebook2