Archive for the ‘dodge challenger hellcat’ Tag

Dodge Challenger ADR prototypes spied with massive rubber

In an effort to give the Dodge Challenger one last hurrah before making the switch to the Giorgio platform in 2018, Automotive News reports that the automaker will come out with the Challenger ADR. The ADR, which stands for American Drag Racer, is expected to be a wide-body, Hellcat-powered variant that is closely based off of the current model. The report seems to have merit, as photographers have captured Challenger prototypes testing with massive tires.

The prototypes look extremely similar to the current Challenger SRT Hellcat with the same hood scoop, front fascia design, rear spoiler construction, and rear end. The white and purple vehicles, though, are wearing extremely wide tires. The extra-wide rubber on the prototypes appear to have a similar tread design as the ones found on the Dodge Viper ACR, which features the grippy Kumho Ecsta V720.

While the ACR wears 295 mm tires at the front, the car’s rear tires are massive at 355 mm. The tires found on the prototype don’t appear to be as large as the ones found on the ACR, but are expected to be larger than the current Challenger SRT Hellcat’s, which are Pirelli P Zero Neros measuring 275 mm at all four corners. The Challenger ADR, with its wider, stickier tires is expected to cater to drivers that are looking to put all of the supercharged 6.2-liter V8’s power to the ground.

The rear-wheel-drive ADR is expected to come with a wide-body kit, which is missing from the prototypes. The Hellcat-powered, wide-body Challenger ADR is expected to make an appearance later in 2017, with an all-wheel-drive model (sans Hellcat engine) known as the GT AWD following closely thereafter.

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First Hellcat tuning software launched

Hellcat Charger and Challenger owners looking for a few extra ponies may be excited to know that the first tuning system for the 6.2L supercharged Hemi has reached the market. It comes from Diablosport, one of the biggest names in the world of tuning, which has a history of adding power with their tuning software.<BR><BR>

Diablosport has three power levels, and an extra bit of added security, should you need to return to the dealership for repairs. In each case, the tune is added by plugging into the car’s diagnostics port and pressing a couple of buttons to add a claimed 30+ rear-wheel horsepower.<BR><BR>

The first tuning option is the stock tune, which works with the stock PCM tune so there is no power increase, but other aspects of the vehicle such as throttle response and transmission shifts are sharpened up for a more engaging driving experience. I haven’t driven a Hellcat car with the “stock tune,” but in other vehicles, it makes a big difference in driving dynamics. The Hellcat Challenger and Charger are good enough that the stock tune likely doesn’t have the impact on these cars that it does on my Dodge Ram, but this is an option for those who want a crisper drive with the stock power.<BR><BR>

The second tuning option is the 91 Octane Performance Tune; it sharpens up the throttle response and adds around 28 horsepower and around 22 lb-ft of torque. Since the Hellcat test cars used by Diablosport laid down 660 rear wheel horsepower, the 91 Octane tune pushes it up around the 690 rwhp mark.<BR><BR>

The top power comes from the 93 Octane Performance tune, which  adds more than 30 horsepower and more than 30 lb-ft of torque. With this, the Hellcat Challenger and Charger are both capable of laying down just over 700 rear wheel horsepower.  Diablosport claimed corrected numbers of 700.2 horsepower at the rear wheels, nearly 40 more horsepower at the rear wheels.<BR><BR>

Additional Features, Added Security<BR><BR>
Regardless of the tune, the Diablosport products allow Hellcat Dodge owners to adjust the neutral and idle RPM, move the rev limiter, adjust a speed limiter, disable the traction and stability control, adjustments for different tire sizes, and adjust when the cooling fan turns on and off – along with adjusting the engine parameters to make better power.<BR><BR>

All of the Diablosport Hellcat tuning packages come with an extra PCM that will make trips to the dealership a little less of a headache. Retuning the engine can both void your engine warranty and  cause  dealership people to give you a hard time when you come in for service. Owners can send their factory PCM to Diablosport to be unlocked, but from there on out, the dealership will be able to tell that the PCM has been accessed.<BR><BR>

The three tuning packages for the Hellcat Charger and Challenger coming with the tuning components themselves, along with an extra PCM already prepared to accept a tune. Thus, owners can swap out the factory PCM for the one with the tuning package; then swap the factory PCM back in before hitting the dealership. (This may violate the owner’s agreement with Dodge/FCA US).<BR><BR>

Partly because of the PCM being included, prices are fairly high. If you only want the modified PCM, e.g. to do custom tuning, Diablosport will sell it to you for $799.<BR><BR>

If you want the full tuning package from Diablosport, you can pick either their Trinity tuner or their InTune tuner, both of which come with the unlocked PCM. The Trinity for the Hellcat costs $1,199 while the InTune system costs $1,099. Based on those numbers and the Diablosport price of $799 for the new PCM, the actual performance tunes and the tuning components (Trinity, InTune) is $300-400.<BR><BR>

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Report Why the Charger Hellcat can’t be ordered with a manual transmission

Fans of truly irreverent amounts of horsepower will find lots to love in the form of the 2015 Dodge Challenger and Charger Hellcat models. Both of them send 707 ridiculous horsepower to the rear wheels; the only question is whether you want your absurdity delivered with two or four doors. Oh, and whether or not you want the option of a manual transmission.

If you prefer rowing your own gears, the choice is made for you; there is no manual gearbox option available on the Charger Hellcat, or any Charger model at all, for that matter. Wonder why? Well, besides the fact that almost nobody – sorry, clutch fans, but it’s true – would choose to buy a Charger with a manual transmission, that is? The answer, according to an industry insider in a post written on Jalopnik’s Opposite Lock forum, is the floorpan.

It’s probably not a surprise to most of our readers that the Dodge Challenger and Charger share a large portion of their chassis structure, which is codenamed LX at Chrysler, but there are still some significant differences under the skin due to the shorter wheelbase and two-door coupe bodyshell of the Challenger, as opposed to the sedan shape of the Charger. One of the differences is the floorpan, the huge chunk of sheetmetal that makes up the floor of the car and props up such essential items as the car’s seats.

According to user doodon2whls, the Dodge Challenger was crash tested way back in 2008 when it first hit the market with a floorpan stamping that can accommodate a manual transmission. The Charger, though, was crash tested and approved by the government two years earlier with the automatic-transmission floorpan stamping only, which means it would need to be completely recertified for sale in the US, with new crash tests included, if Dodge decided to offer it with a six-speed manual. That’s an expensive proposition, especially considering how few manual models Dodge would ever sell.

Good thing, then, that the eight-speed automatic transmission that Dodge pairs with pretty much all of its rear-wheel-drive vehicles is such a good unit. Having tested numerous Charger and Challenger models in all states of tune and with every available transmission option, we’re here to tell you that you’ll be plenty pleased with the Hellcat’s 707 horsepower, whether it’s being channeled through an automatic or manual transmission.

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Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Is The Most Powerful Muscle Car Ever — 707 hp!


The all-new 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT, with its supercharged 6.2-liter HEMI Hellcat engine, produces an unprecedented 707 horsepower and 650 lb.-ft. of torque, making it the most powerful Challenger ever, Dodge’s most powerful V-8 ever and the most powerful muscle car ever.

The Challenger’s new 6.2-liter Supercharged Hellcat engine is also the first factory supercharged HEMI, as well as Dodge and SRT’s first application of V-8 supercharger technology. For the first time in Chrysler Group history, the all-new 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT with a Hellcat engine comes standard with two key fobs — red and black. The red key fob is the only key that can unlock the full 707 horsepower and torque potential of the Challenger SRT Hellcat engine; while the black key fob limits the driver to a reduced engine output of 500 horsepower.In addition to the awe-inspiring 707 horsepower of the new Hellcat HEMI, the new 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat has been redesigned and totally re-engineered to be the most true-to-form muscle coupe on the market with performance-enhancing technologies inside and out, including the new TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission and an all-new interior inspired by the classic 1971 Challenger.The Dodge and SRT brands now offer the most complete lineup of muscle cars in the market, including the new 2015 Dodge Challenger SXT with its standard powerful and fuel-efficient Pentastar V-6 engine combined with the TorqueFlite eight-speed transmission that delivers 300 horsepower and an estimated 30 miles per gallon; the 2015 Dodge Challenger R/T with the high-torque 5.7-liter HEMI now paired with the TorqueFlite eight-speed or six-speed manual transmission; and the all-new 6.4-liter HEMI Challenger Scat Pack that delivers 485 horsepower and 475 lb.-ft. of torque with the TorqueFlite eight-speed or six-speed manual.

The 2015 Dodge Challenger and Challenger SRTs are built at the Brampton, Ontario, Assembly Plant and will start arriving in Dodge dealerships in the third quarter of 2014.

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