Archive for the ‘detroit michigan’ Tag

Where’s the cheapest gas in the US? It’s Michigan

MICHIGAN — Of all 50 states, Michigan now has the cheapest gas prices in the entire country, according to data from GasBuddy.com. But it likely won’t last long.

Michigan’s average price for a gallon of gas is $1.802, barely beating out Oklahoma’s $1.804 per gallon.

Nationally, the average is around $2.03 per gallon.

GasBuddy.com analyst Patrick DeHaan said on Twitter it was back on Feb. 26, 2009—more than 2,400 days ago—that gas prices were this low in the state. DeHaan also said it’s likely the lowered prices won’t last more than 24-48 hours.

Why the drop?

DeHaan says it’s likely because of some ‘healthy competition’ as gas stations are continuing to try undercut each other. But he said it won’t stick around.

“I expect an upward adjustment likely tomorrow as most stations have been selling at a loss,” he told FOX 17. “I’d top off tonight, but wouldn’t get too excited when prices rise, because I’m expecting they’ll stay under $2 more often than over it thru the rest of 2015.”

Both Kalamazoo and Van Buren counties are averaging the cheapest gas prices with an average of $1.60 per gallon.

Missouri has the third cheapest gas in the state with an average price for gallon around $1.817.

Read more at: http://fox17online.com/2015/11/29/wheres-the-cheapest-gas-in-the-us-its-about-to-be-michigan/

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Dodge is 100 Years Old

DETROIT — Let’s be honest: For 100 years, Dodge has been spinning its wheels.

During the good times, it has done so literally: delivering performance, power and passion to a domestic audience that hungered for vehicles that stood out in a crowd, with the smell of burning rubber.

But when times were bad, Dodge lost its way. The brand’s history is strewn with vehicles that shouldn’t have worn the Dodge name.

On July 1, Dodge will be 100 years old.

Dodge’s muddled history explains why it’s hard today to say clearly what the brand is all about. Over the years, Dodge has pitched a woman’s car, muscle cars, pickups, family haulers, rebadged Japanese compacts and more.

But the muddle is also why the brand’s current mission — affordable performance — strikes a chord. Unlike the past, the new mission is well-defined and compelling.

The mission was spelled out by the team of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne in May when it unveiled the automaker’s five-year product and business plan.

Dodge’s potential first blossomed 100 years ago in Detroit with its founders, brothers John and Horace Dodge.

The inseparable business partners and tinkerers had made a killing as suppliers for other automakers, including Ford Motor Co. and Oldsmobile. Most would have been happy with the success.

Yet, in 1914, John and Horace Dodge risked everything they had built on the belief that they could make a better car than the competition.

Their first car, an all-steel-bodied sedan, rolled off the assembly line on Nov. 14, 1914, one of 249 built that year.

Six years later, only their former client Ford would sell more cars and trucks in the United States. Those early Dodge cars were more costly than the Ford Model T — $785 compared with $490 — but they were technically more advanced and more powerful, and they had an all-steel chassis.

But since then, Dodge has struggled at times with its identity. It has been a part of Chrysler since 1928 when Walter P. Chrysler bought the brand from New York investment bankers.

In the 1950s, Dodge created both the high-performance D-500 and the La Femme, a car for women, whose defining feature was a matching umbrella.

Three decades later, Dodge had helped create an entirely new segment with the Caravan minivan, yet it also sold the strange-looking Rampage, a compact car with a cargo bed mashed on the back.

Still, Dodge produced some exceptional and iconic vehicles over the decades. The Charger and Challenger were favorites during the muscle-car era of the late 1960s and early 1970s. When those nameplates were resurrected in the 2000s, their fans returned.

In 1993, Dodge also redefined what the pickup truck should look like with its “Big Rig”-inspired Ram 1500.

A year earlier, the brand began selling what some consider was the original American supercar, the crude, boorish and absolutely thrilling Dodge Viper.

Today’s Dodge finds itself in the midst of another brand refocusing.

When Italian automaker Fiat took over in 2009, it wanted to make Dodge a multiline competitor to Ford and Chevrolet, only without its pickups or commercial vehicles, which were spun off to create Ram.

But in May, Dodge’s role as Chrysler Group’s Ford and Chevy fighter was transferred to the Chrysler brand.

Under current brand head Tim Kuniskis, Dodge is being restored to its originalplace as an affordable performance brand, much as John and Horace Dodge had envisioned. It’s dropping some models — the lackluster Avenger sedan and the Caravan minivan — and adding high-performance versions of the rest of its lineup.

Other than SRT versions of existing nameplates, Dodge isn’t scheduled to expand its lineup until early 2018. So, under the brand’s plan, it will take at least four years for the brand’s sales to return to the 596,000 units it hit in 2013.

But now, Dodge has a clear identity. We’re not talking BMW-like refined performance. This is the domestic variety — loud, brash, bold. Fun.

It’s a risky plan — one that would make John and Horace Dodge proud.

As read on: http://www.autonews.com/article/20140616/OEM/140619925/after-100-years-dodges-identity-still-tough-to-pin-down#

Chrysler Commercial Vehicle Heritage | Dodge Brothers Inc. Joins the Chrysler Group Family

May 28 marks an important milestone in our history here at Chrysler Commercial Vehicles.  It was on this day in 1928 that Dodge Brothers Inc. — a pioneer in utility and work vehicles — became a part of the Chrysler family.

The official history of the Dodge automobile begins in 1914, but the story of the Dodge brothers in the automobile business reaches back even further. Brothers John and Horace Dodge, talented machinists and ambitious businessmen, rose from humble beginnings to become giants in the early American automobile industry.

In 1901, after several years of building bicycles and piecework components for the budding auto industry, the brothers founded a machine shop in Detroit and began producing transmissions.

In 1914, the brothers formed a new company, Dodge Brothers, Inc., capitalized with $5 million in common stock, and began building their own vehicles — the world’s first mass-produced all-steel touring cars. In 1915, more than 45,000 Dodge cars were built and sold, the best first-year sales record for a new car in the industry at the time.

With their early passenger cars earning recognition for durability and value, the Dodge brothers soon began considering ways to convert their successful car platform to truck applications. During 1917, their firm began producing “commercial cars,” including military ambulances and screen-sided business trucks. Panel delivery trucks, fire trucks, pickups, chassis-cabs and other models were soon offered.

1924 Dodge Brothers Screenside truck

During 1920, the company lost its founding fathers. John Dodge died in January, and his younger brother Horace succumbed the following December.

A New York investment banking firm paid the brothers’ widows, in a single cash payment, $146 million for the Dodge Brothers firm. Within three years, the bankers initiated negotiations, and on May 28, 1928, Walter P. Chrysler purchased Dodge Brothers, Inc. for $170 million, making it, at the time, the largest business transaction in history.

When the transaction was complete, the Chrysler Corporation had grown fivefold overnight to become the third of Detroit’s “Big Three” automakers.

Read more at: http://blog.chryslercommercialvehicles.com/2014/05/22/dodge-brothers-inc/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_campaign=THMay2814Facebook6&ism=THMay2814Facebook6

Presenting the Chrysler 300C John Varvatos Limited Edition

Chrysler has partnered with award-winning designer and Detroit native John Varvatos to create a new Chrysler 300 with strong design cues, high-end finishes and emboldened performance. It’s the Chrysler 300C John Varvatos Limited Edition. We can’t wait for you to see it.

From the outside in, it reflects the renowned designer’s hard-edged style with muted metallic details, hand-stitched accents and textured metals. And beneath it all is the exceptionally engineered Chrysler 300 — the brand’s flagship sedan.

The hardcore style of John Varvatos meets Chrysler pedigree to give this Chrysler 300C an edge that can only come from Detroit. Find out more about the world of John Varvatos at johnvarvatos.com

To see this fashion-forward vehicle and learn more about the partnership between Chrysler and John Varvatos, click HERE to Sign Up for Updates.