Archive for the ‘cummins diesel’ Tag

Meet the 2015 Ram Laramie Limited

With high sales of luxury trucks, an upgraded top-end Ram pickup is not surprising — unlike its 1968-Plymouth-Barracuda-like grille (actually based on an interesting piece of furniture, according to Ram’s chief exterior designer).

Meet the new 2015 Ram 1500 Laramie Limited and 2016 Ram 2500 and 3500 Laramie Limited.

Pricing has not been announced, but the outgoing models start at $49,320 (Ram 1500), $53,195 (Ram 2500), and $54,440 (Ram 3500). That is for the 5.7 liter Hemi V8, driving the rear wheels, with a crew cab, and a 5’7” box on the 1500 and eight-foot box on the heavy duties. 4×4 is extra; a VM diesel is available on the 1500, a Cummins diesel or 6.4 V8 on the 2500 and 3500. We expect the new models to have the same powertrain options and similar pricing despite interior and exterior upgrades.

The chrome bumpers shown here are standard on some 2500 and 3500 trucks, optional on the full line. We believe the Ram 1500 will have a standard eight speed automatic while the 2500 and 3500 will keep the current six speeds (66RFE on 2500, with optional 68RFE; and 68RFE on 3500, with optional Aisin).

The company has not announced any equipment upgrades, but the vehicles shown have sensors in the front bumper (including one in the side) which may be used for forward parking sensors (forward cross path detection would be an interesting addition).

These are the second recent Ram trucks to break from the crosshair theme which started in the 1930s and have stuck with Dodge and Ram pickups off and on (mostly on) since then.

For many more photos and more information, click here.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/meet-the-2015-ram-laramie-limited

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Nissan Frontier Prototype Powered by Cummins Diesel

When Nissan dropped the Frontier Diesel Runner Concept with a 2.8-liter Cummins diesel four-cylinder under its transparent hood at the 2014 Chicago auto show, it was like a bomb had exploded at McCormick Place. A diesel engine in a compact pickup! (Or something like that, given the Windy City show’s sleepy reputation.) Where have you been all of our lives? Besides every other country, of course.

Indeed, as with driver-side sliding doors on minivans and express-open windows, a diesel-powered compact seemed (and still seems) like a why-haven’t-we-had-this-all-along kind of idea. After all, with prodigious torque and considerable fuel economy advantages over large-displacement gasoline-powered engines, diesels are natural fits for larger pickups, so why not small trucks?

So we were first in line to sample a modestly equipped, Cummins-powered Frontier Crew Cab prototype that Nissan provided for evaluation. And while the powertrain itself was rough and in need of a heavy dose of refinement, what we experienced made us that much more convinced that the diesel compact truck has a future here.

The diesel engine itself is a new, 2.8-liter mill that produces approximately 200 horsepower and a hearty 350 lb-ft of torque, according to Nissan. Being careful not to overstate its claims about the diesel’s capability, Nissan instead is emphasizing the mill’s fuel efficiency, which it says should increase by about 35 percent compared with the gas-powered V-6 in the 2014 Frontier. It will do so while also roughly matching the six-holer’s towing and payload capacities (which can reach up to 6500 and 1480 pounds, respectively). So you don’t have to look it up, the Frontier Crew Cab V-6 achieves an EPA estimated 16 mpg city/22 mpg highway, so we figure that a diesel-powered version would jump into the 22-mpg city/30-mpg highway neighborhood. But compare the power figures to the 261 horsepower and 281 lb-ft produced by the V-6 and the 152 horses and 171 lb-ft of the inline-four in the current Frontier, and one can see how anybody who regularly tows a trailer or fills the bed might be attracted to such a machine.

How’s it drive? Well, without balance shafts, optimized engine mounts, and other refinements, the Cummins engine’s current state means it isn’t close to ready for production, even mated as it is to ZF’s versatile 8HP70 eight-speed automatic transmission. The engine vibrates considerably, and is none too discreet with its industrial-sounding, spoon-in-a-blender diesel clatter. And there is “intentional” turbo lag, according to Cummins marketing communications manager Steve Sanders, who rode along with us for the test drive. “You’ll see why.”

Alas, we did, upon our first full-throttle start. The engine roared and we traveled a sluggish initial 30 to 40 feet, then the rear wheels began to spin wildly, prompting us to back off the throttle to regain our grip. Of course, we repeated this procedure at every subsequent opportunity—delayed-reaction burnouts are fun, don’t ya know. Yet, the diesel is eminently drivable when operated with some judiciousness. It’s hardly quick off the line, but the copious reserves of grunt are truly satisfying. We would have loved to load up the bed with a half-ton of stuff and see how it performed, but that will have to wait for another time.

So it works. We had no doubts that it would. Moving forward, we will be interested to see how refined this powertrain becomes as it nudges toward something salable. Truck diesels don’t need to be as whisper-quiet and smooth as those found in modern luxury sedans, but the shaking and valvetrain noise will nonetheless have to be tamed, and the turbo lag will need to be smoothed out before anyone would choose it over a gas V-6. Anything is possible, said Sanders, but to what extent that will happen “depends on how much Nissan wants to spend.” ZF, at least, is a willing partner, although the eight-speed’s electronic shifter design will likely change from the prototype’s current T-shaped handle lifted from the Jeep Grand Cherokee.

So, what are its chances for production? Quite good, at least for the next-generation Frontier, which is still two or three years away. By then, the Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon mid-size pickups will be on the streets with their own 2.8-liter four-cylinder diesel. This Frontier would give Nissan a compression-ignition answer to those trucks, one brandishing the Cummins name, no less. Hey, it worked wonders for Dodge and Ram trucks.

It’s too early to nail down a price for the Cummins-powered Frontier, but expect to pay a decent premium over a comparably equipped gas V-6 version. Based on the $25K currently charged for a Frontier S 2WD short-wheelbase Crew Cab V-6 automatic, the Cummins diesel version would likely push $30,000.

Certainly, if enthusiasm among the Nissan and Cummins people dictated the decision, a production Frontier diesel would be here tomorrow. “I hope Nissan goes for it,” said Sanders. “At this point, it would almost be cruel if it didn’t.” We agree.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/nissan-frontier-cummins-diesel-prototype-drive-review

Ram diesel trucks “most durable;” 25 years of Cummins

Given the reputation of Cummins as a maker of bullet-proof diesel engines, it is hard to be surprised by Ram’s announcement today that their Cummins-powered trucks are Canada’s most durable diesel pickups.

The first Cummins-powered light-duty pickups (confusing called “heavy duty” or “super duty” by GM, Chrysler, and Ford) appeared in 1989, immediately boosting Dodge pickup sales. The current version of the Cummins B-series engine is far more powerful than in those early days, and has increased in displacement from 5.9 to 6.7 liters; they now produce up to 385 horsepower and 850 lb-ft of torque, more than any competitor.

Ram chassis cabs with the Cummins diesel reach 37,500 lb of gross combined weight ratings; the Ram Heavy Duty has a class-leading 30,000 lb of towing capacity. The engine is the only one shared by heavy equipment and light-duty pickup trucks; it uses an iron head (rather than aluminum), with 30%-40% fewer moving components than competitors.

Ram uses three versions of the engine; the first is paired with a segment-exclusive six-speed manual transmission, which has  a wear-compensating clutch. The diesel is rated at 350 horsepower at 2,800 rpm and 660 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,400 rpm with this transmission. Coupled to the 68RFE six-speed automatic transmission, it is rated at 370 horsepower at 2,800 rpm with an unsurpassed in ¾-ton trucks 800 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,600 rpm. Finally, with the Aisin wide-ratio six-speed automatic transmission (AS69RC), the Cummins is rated at 385 horsepower at 2,800 rpm, with best-in-class torque of 850 lb.-ft. at 1,700 rpm.

The “most durable” claim comes from a study showing the percentage of Canadian diesel pickups sold within the last 20 years that are still on the road, by brand.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/02/ram-diesel-trucks-most-durable-25-years-of-cummins