Archive for the ‘chevy’ Tag

Renewed Ram comparisons

With both Chevrolet Colorado and Ford F-150 boasting of their fuel economy— the latter without actually releasing it yet — Ram has done the footwork to provide comparisons of their mileage versus every competitor.

Of note, the Ram 1500 V6 is no longer the most efficient full-sized gasoline-powered pickup, though it is tied for best with the Chevrolet Silverado. The Ram 1500 diesel does retain the title of most efficient full or midsized pickup, arguably, with Tacoma coming in at the same rounded combined mileage (1 mpg better city, 3 mpg worse highway). Tacoma is smaller, and comes with a four cylinder engine coupled to a manual transmission.

The new Ford F-150’s gas mileage has yet to be revealed; the company has already said that it will be the highest-mileage F-150 ever,  but has not said it will be the best in the full size segment.

Ram wrote that their 1500 achieved strong mileage through its low drag (0.36 cD compared with mode of around 0.40, resulting in a gain of around 0.4 mpg on the highway); eight-speed automatic and parasitic loss prevention systems (around 2 mpg gain); and diesel engine (around 6 mpg gain). A Ram press release claimed that a 500 pound weight reduction results in around a 2% increase in fuel economy, or around 0.5 mpg.

Ford continues to enjoy a reputation for fuel economy, though F-150 is near the bottom of the class, ironically only beating a pair of Japanese trucks. The top two trucks in fuel economy come from two companies whose reputation among the general public is, also ironically, for inefficient powertrains: Chrysler/Ram and GM/Chevrolet.

Ram fuel economy

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/11/renewed-ram-comparisons

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Ram 3500 still best in class for towing

Ram has confirmed that the Ram 3500 pickup still has a 30,000-pound towing capacity when tested under SAE’s J2807 standards.

Ford, which has, until now, avoided the SAE standard, is now saying that its claim of 31,200 pounds for the F-450 pickup also meets the standard, even when the 150 pounds of “customer-deletable” items, like the spare tire, jack and center console, are added back in.

This answers questions about towing capacities but fails to answer the question of who is best in Class 3 towing, because the F-450’s credentials as a direct competitor to the Ram 3500 are dubious, at best.

The primary criterion for being in Class 3 is having a gross vehicle weight (GVWR) — payload plus curb weight — at or below 14,000 pounds. Ford claims that both its top F-350 and its sole F-450 pickup have the same GVWR, 14,000 pounds. The GVWR is set by the manufacturer.

The Ram 3500 is a true Class 3 pickup, meeting the standards in curb weight trim.

The Ford F-450 pickup, unlike every other model in the F-450 range, is built on an F-350 chassis, but uses Class 4 components. Ford originally skirted Class 3 limits by stripping standard equipment from the F-450 and redefining the term “curb weight.” In other words, a customer buying an F-450 with all the stuff it is supposed to include, such as a full tank of gas and 300 pounds of driver/payload, will likely find their truck’s curb weight actually falls into the Class 4 weight range.

So is the F-450 Super Duty a Class 3 truck? If so, why doesn’t Ford call it an F-350 and drop the current model? Perhaps it’s an F-400? A F-350 Super-Duper Duty? An F-350½?

The Ram’s claim is rooted in the fact that the Ford F-350, Chevrolet Silverado 3500 and GMC Sierra 3500 cannot tow as much as the Ram 3500. Therefore, the Ram claim is supported.

The question is, why does Ford simply not say the F-450 has the highest towing capacity of any factory-built pickup? Since no other standard pickup is rated to tow 31,200 pounds, that would be true. It might also help justify the extra $10,000-plus for the F-450 compared to either the Ram 3500 or the Ford F-350.

There’s no doubt that Ram could produce a similar vehicle by adding a Ram 3500 bed to a Ram 5500. Wonder what the the towing capacity of such a truck might be, if Ram stretched their legs? (The top towing capacity of a Ram chassis cab is 29,600 lb.)

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/09/ram-3500-still-best-in-class-for-towing

Dodge defines itself

After one hundred years, the Dodge brand has issued a definitive vision of its future, and it’s about as far from its origins as it can be.

A recent press release stated, “With the purification of the brand and consolidation with SRT, Dodge is getting back to its performance roots with every single model it offers.”

When Dodge gained its “performance roots” is a matter of opinion; the early Dodges were slow, even by the standards of the day, but sturdy and relatively safe. The first “fast” Dodges came with the Hemi engines, but they were kept below Chrysler levels. In reality, Dodge’s “performance roots” probably began with the 1956 Dodge D-500 package.

The press release continued, “Dodge is the ‘mainstream performance’  brand … SRT is positioned as the “ultimate performance” halo…”

This slots Dodge right in the position John DeLorean put Pontiac into — a position Pontiac had never been in before. Under Mr. DeLorean, the “old folks’” brand became GM’s performance brand, and sales skyrocketed. Pontiac was finally shut down after years of cars whose main differentiator was extra body cladding, followed by a relatively brief “clean look” period.

When Fiat first took over, leaders said they intended for Dodge to be a modern sports-car brand, emphasizing handling; this approach, used by the Dart, did not work, but the 707-horsepower Hellcat Hemi has garnered a great deal of attention and interest from potential buyers. As a result, it appears that Dodge will be aiming at traditional American views of sporty cars.

The strategy could backfire in years when gas prices zoom upwards, but not if Dodge is counterbalanced with Chrysler on the economy side, and resists the temptation to buy sales with economy cars. Over ten to twenty years, if the company sticks to the strategy, Dodge may find itself with a clear reputation among buyers, and a larger hard core of return customers.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/09/dodge-defines-itself

Jeep’s Strong first half

During the first six months of 2014, the Jeep brand has produced stellar results. Measured by sales growth, it has outperformed every major brand in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

In the U.S., Jeep sales from January to June were up 45% and Jeep’s market share rose 1.2% to 4.1%. Jeep’s market share growth was the highest of any brand.

Jeep went from the No. 9 spot in the rankings to No. 7, passing Dodge to be Chrysler Group’s best-selling brand. When it comes to SUVs, Jeep is second only to the Ford brand.
Incidentally, Chrysler Group has the highest average sales per SUV model of any automaker. It’s second only to General Motors in terms of total utility volume.

In Canada, Jeep sales were up 41% at the end of June, the highest growth rate of any major brand. Market share rose by an entire point. Only Nissan picked up more share and that was only by a tenth of a point.

While we only have European numbers through May, the story is very much the same: Jeep’s sales growth is the largest of any major brand.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/07/jeeps-fabulous-first-half

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