Archive for the ‘challenger’ Tag

AN AFTERNOON IN A DODGE CHALLENGER 6.4L SCAT PACK

I have a friend who gets press cars nearly every week. Sometimes the cars are pretty cool. Sometimes not so much. In any case, I’ve been patiently waiting and FINALLY he got something I was excited about. A 2015 Dodge Challenger 6.4L Scat Pack. Phantom Black. Nice.

Now all I needed to do was finagle a ride or two while he had the car.

When he found out he was getting a Scat Pack, he asked me about it. Not normally one to keep quiet about such things, this time I simply said, “You’ll like it.” Further attempts to gain information from me were met with the same reply. (In retrospect, I realize this was not the most charming way to earn the joyride I so deeply wanted.)

So he turned to the Internet and suddenly I heard, “4,200 pounds?!?!”

To this I chuckled and said, “It is a heavy car.” And it was on. I thought I would never hear the end of it.

Then, he drove the car.

Suddenly, the weight was less of an issue. Instead, he told me how much he enjoyed driving this car. He liked the interior—both the spaciousness and the quality. The technology is advanced, yet easy to use. (Uconnect is definitely one of his new favorite toys.) Everything is available at the touch of a button without being overly complicated.

The Challenger Scat Pack doesn’t make apologies for what it is. Nor does it pretend to be something it’s not. It is a big, heavy, powerful car and it handles as such. Carrying 52 percent of its weight in the front, it does require a skilled driver. As my friend put it, you can’t be lazy when you’re driving it or you’ll find yourself in trouble.

Of course, a skilled driver in a controlled environment can also have some serious fun in this car. Spin outs, 360s, a little bit of showboating … entertaining and impressive to those watching and, of course, all in good fun.

The look of Phantom Black is menacing. Put together with the throaty exhaust note and this car got plenty of attention. I have to admit one of my favorite parts about riding in the car was watching all of the other American muscle cars slowly roll up next to us at stoplights. It was great to look over and see the other drivers checking out the car. (I swear I’ve never seen as many Camaros as I did the afternoon we were out driving the Scat.) Maybe a little less so when it was a member of law enforcement doing the same.

As read on: http://chryslercapital.com/blog/an-afternoon-in-a-dodge-challenger-6-4l-scat-pack-no-apologies-just-fun?utm_source=Chrysler+Capital&utm_medium=email&utm_content=read_more_2&utm_campaign=CC-CUST-NEWS_BestofBlog_Feb%20(1)

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Watch the Hellcat pound the C7 Corvette Z06

We have already seen the big, bad 2015 Corvette Z06 lose from a stop and from a roll against a Dodge Viper TA, and today, we have a video pitting the supercharged’ Vette against the most powerful American muscle car of all time – the 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat.

The 2015 Challenger Hellcat has a pretty substantial advantage in power, packing 707 horsepower to the Corvette’s 650, and while torque levels are the same, the Corvette is a great deal lighter. To be exact, the C7 Corvette Z06 is roughly a thousand pounds lighter than the Hellcat Challenger while also being more aerodynamic than the big, brawny Mopar muscle car.

When you look at the improved aerodynamics, the comparable torque and the substantially lower curb weight of the 2015 Corvette Z06, many people believed that the most track capable Corvette ever would still hand a beating to the Hellcat Challenger, even with the big advantage in horsepower. Some went so far as to speculate that the Challenger would win in a quarter mile race with everything else equal, but it was expected that on a longer run, the weight and aero properties of the Corvette would be the winning difference.

All of those people appear to be wrong, as the first high speed race video featuring the 2015 Corvette Z06 and the 2015 Challenger Hellcat show the Mopar muscle car handing the Chevy supercar a severe beating in two separate runs. We get to see the Hellcat eating up the Corvette from two different angles and while the on-car view shows how quickly the two high performance American coupes blast away from the slow-moving traffic, they both display the same sad fate for the Corvette…beaten badly at the hands of a “lowly muscle car”.

It appears as though the most track capable Corvette of all time might be a beast on the road course, but it struggles to keep up with the mighty Hellcat Challenger on the open road.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/01/watch-the-hellcat-pound-the-c7-corvette-z06

2015 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 6.4L Automatic

The performance-car world has turned a corner. It’s a corner that, for a long time, those of us who savor engaging one’s left leg and right arm to shift gears have been reluctant to admit even exists: In most instances, no objective case can be made for choosing a manual over an automatic when it comes to performance. Automatic gearboxes have improved so much that oftentimes they are both more fuel-efficient and quicker than their manual counterparts. Curse you, technology!

The latest example of this reality is the 2015 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack, one of the more beastly muscle cars to ever have leapt from a Detroit-based engineering department. Sharing its naturally aspirated, 392-cubic-inch pushrod V-8 (Dodge likes to cite the displacement in cubic inches because heritage!) with the pricier, somewhat higher-tech SRT 392 model, the R/T Scat Pack comes with a choice of a six-speed Tremec TR6060 manual or, for $1400 more, an eight-speed paddle-shifted TorqueFlite automatic. We tested the manual version a few months ago, and that car also lost a three-way comparison test with a Ford Mustang GT and a Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE, yet this Challenger impressed us with its brute force, bad-ass attitude, and ear-shredding exhaust note. The automatic version, it turns out, is actually quite satisfying to drive, too.

One Mississippi, Two Mississippi . . .

First, the numbers. We blasted to 60 mph in a blistering 4.2 seconds, hit triple-digit speeds in 9.6 seconds, and passed the quarter-mile mark in 12.6 seconds at 114 mph. The manual Scat Pack hit those same benchmarks in 4.4 seconds, 10.2 seconds, and 12.9 seconds at 113 mph. The improvement is in no part attributable to the Scat Pack’s programmable launch control, which is part of the standard Performance Pages app. Our test driver, senior editor Tony Quiroga, noted that, regardless of how low he set launch rpm using the system, some tenths were lost to excess wheelspin. The best way to launch, we found, is simply to ease into the throttle through first gear, dipping deeper as second engages and resisting the urge to mash the pedal until you’re midway through second gear. Otherwise, it’s a cloudy day in the neighborhood.

The transmission itself is a honey, as we’ve noted in our reviews of other vehicles that use it. Demure as a housecat in its default settings and bordering on violent in its more aggressive settings, the ZF-designed TorqueFlite eight-speed unit delivers satisfyingly quick and rev-matched downshifts at the tug of the left paddle. It’s not quite as speedy to swap ratios as a dual-clutch automatic, but it’s far from your typical slushbox. We give serious kudos to Dodge’s engineers for tuning this transmission to match the raucous personality of the Hemi underhood.

For what it’s worth, we expect that the launch control would come in handy on an actual drag strip, especially with slicks, but we test in conditions more like those you’d find in the real world. Still, 4.2 seconds to 60 is pretty damn good for a 4261-pound full-size two-door sedan—which is essentially what the Challenger is. Just as impressive are the Brembo brakes (with four-piston calipers at each corner), which yank the big guy down to a stop from 70 mph in just 154 feet.

The Scat Pack’s throttle is also quite touchy even with the powertrain in its most docile setting, regularly provoking the same wheelspin we experienced at the test track. This is less of a problem for us, but it becomes worrisome when we think about valets screeching backward into parking spots. And when the roads get slippery, well, suffice it to say that the Scat Pack is a fair-weather friend.

The Challenger Scat Pack can turn surprisingly well, too, thanks to quick steering (just 2.3 turns lock-to-lock) that can be dialed up both in terms of effort and feel via the Performance Pages. But be sure you know how to catch a slide before you turn off the stability control, as the 245/45 Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar tires generated 0.90 g of lateral grip on our skidpad; that’s a decent number, but it’s not so sticky that the rear won’t break loose fairly easily under power. Even when that happens, though, the body remains heroically flat thanks to a stiffened suspension. We noted moderate understeer on the level skidpad, but if you’re heading downhill on, say, a mountain road, it’s best to respect the fact that 55 percent of the car’s mass is riding over the front wheels—and that this Dodge is all too happy to push your line wide.

Adding It Up

While the automatic Scat Pack starts at $39,890, this particular example was loaded with options, including radar cruise control and other driving aids, navigation, a sunroof, upgraded speakers, and the $1995 Appearance group (including blackout trim, black 20-inch wheels, and bumblebee stripes). It also had a red-and-black faux-suede and leather interior that contrasted dramatically with its stormy gray paint.

The sticker thus had an eye-watering bottom-line price of $47,360, a few hundred bucks more than the $46,990 SRT 392. For that kind of coin, we might recommend stepping up to a basic SRT 392, if only to get the adjustable Bilstein shocks—they keep the car buttoned down in corners but also impart a far more highway-friendly ride. The 392 also has stronger brakes and comes with a complimentary day of driver training.

While the Challenger R/T Scat Pack is heavy no matter what transmission you choose, and the automatic is unlikely to change the car’s standing in the aforementioned comparison test, it is a very fast and charismatic muscle car that delivers on every promise made by its bodacious styling. We dig it.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-challenger-r-t-scat-pack-automatic-test-review

What can we expect from the 2015 Dodge Charger R/T

The new Dodge Charger R/T is like the high-school athlete whose brothers have gone on to star in college and pro ranks. Indeed, with the formidable Hellcat V-8 and the SRT 392 hogging the spotlight, the kid brother’s credentials pale. After all, the 392 packs 485 horsepower and the Hellcat lays a 707-horse smackdown, heady numbers that could make one perceive the R/T’s 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 as a little tame.

Do not be deceived. Unless you have an insatiable appetite for shredding tires, the 5.7’s output—370 horsepower, 395 lb-ft of torque—will satisfy most needs for speed. Okay, the R/T is governed to a mere 145 mph versus the Hellcat’s 204, but you’ll still reach the Chinese takeout place before they pack up your food, and 5.1 seconds to 60 mph will leave most sedans gasping for breath.

Track Pack Plus

Surprisingly, given its mass, the R/T has a good dynamic résumé. The driver is aware of the substantial, two-plus-ton curb weight, but the Charger’s chassis tuning mitigates that number very well.

Thanks to a rigid unibody, the basic Charger R/T nicely manages yaw, pitch, and roll. But those who love to drive are advised to get the 29R Customer Preferred pack, which upgrades the car, as it did on our test example, to Road & Track spec. Doing so means a cornucopia of goodies including the Super Track Pak sport suspension; the Road & Track Performance Group with more aggressive throttle mapping, revised traction control (higher intervention threshold), heavy-duty brakes, 20-inch aluminum wheels, and sportier rubber (245/45 Goodyear Eagle RS-A2 all-season performance tires); and Dodge’s Performance Pages software, which allows the driver to track acceleration, cornering, and a variety of other numeric markers.

There’s a lot of other desirable stuff crammed into the 29R package, too, including nappa leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats (heated front chairs come on every R/T), a power tilt and telescope steering column, a heated steering wheel, power-adjustable pedals, and heated power mirrors, to hit a few high spots. At $3000 for all the foregoing equipment, it’s a must-have bargain collection.

Augmented by all the Track Pack goodies, the R/T dances even more remarkably well for a big car, the combination of quick (2.5 turns lock-to-lock), gratifyingly accurate electric power steering and firm suspension making it easy to place the car precisely where the driver wishes. And there’s enough grip to inspire confidence in very fast cornering.

It’s also very easy to develop affection for the eight-speed automatic. Shifts in the Charger aren’t quite as whap-whap quick as those delivered by some of the very best dual-clutch automatics, but one could call them deliberate, and in manual mode the transmission will hold the selected gear against redline—no autonomous upshifting.

The eight-speed is new for this year and slightly enhances EPA fuel economy versus last year’s five-speed unit, adding 1 mpg to the car’s city rating. That means 16 mpg in urban environs and 25 on the highway, on midgrade fuel, which is pretty good for a big V-8. We averaged 18 mpg in mixed driving. Would economy go up if the Hemi were fitted with direct fuel injection? Probably. But fuel economy isn’t a high priority for Hemi fans, nor for cars operating in this performance realm.

The car doesn’t have many demerits, and those it does have aren’t deal-breakers. We’ve already mentioned mass; cutting the curb weight would further improve handling and efficiency. The suspension tuning that gives the R/T its athletic reflexes can be a little stiff on gnarly pavement, and while grip—0.86 g—isn’t exactly a weak suit, it could be improved by a set of real summer performance tires.

Such tires would probably improve the braking performance, too, as 170 feet from 70 mph is long for a car with sports-sedan pretense. We detected no real fade in the system, but the pedal did begin to go a little soft after repeated hard stops.

The Right Stuff

Considered in standard trim and before its 2015 refresh, the Charger ranked behind mainstream sedan offerings like the Toyota Avalon and the Chevy Impala in our comparison test. But for the owner who wants a strong performance component in the everyday drive, the new R/T has the right stuff for an agreeable $33,990 starting MSRP.

Our test car got expensive quickly, however. In addition to the $3000 Preferred/R&T stuff (again, don’t leave the showroom without it), it had $6975 of additional options. These included $995 for Beats audio gear; $1795 for the Technology Group (rain-sensing wipers, auto high beams, and safety nannies); $295 for Driver Confidence equipment (blind-spot and cross-path warning, exterior puddle lamps); and $695 for navigation, infotainment goodies, and a backup camera. Our car also was fitted with a power sunroof ($1195), Redline Red paint ($500), and a black-painted roof ($1500).

The grand total came to $43,965. That’s more than the cheap-speed $40,990 R/T Scat Pack, although still well shy of the $48,380 Charger SRT 392. (The wild and wooly Hellcat opens at $64,990.) In any case, there do seem to be some opportunities for whittling. Okay, the red paint is probably important, as it emphasizes the aggressive styling. On the other hand, do you really need the safety technology, puddle lamps, or the black roof?

Options notwithstanding, this Charger figures as an underappreciated performance bargain in a full-size sedan. It’s everyday useful and ready to rock every day.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-charger-r-t-hemi-test-review

Hellcat options (with prices)

The 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat follows the expected SRT form, coming with a long list of standard features inside and out. There aren’t all that many options for buyers, since the $62,295 car includes everything that you need to love every single second of driving the 2015 Charger Hellcat, including heated leather seats and a high end infotainment system. Still, you can add some unique features to make your car different from the other examples of the world’s most powerful production sedan.

First off, the 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat MSRP of $62,295 does not include the $1,700 gas guzzler tax or the $995 destination fee, which combine to bring the base price of the 707hp Charger to $64,990. In theory, that is the least that you can expect to pay when buying a Hellcat Charger from your local dealership before you get to cashing in favors or haggling.

The 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat has seven standard (no cost) exterior colors and three premium colors that add $500 to the final price. The “free” colors are Billet Silver, Bright White, Granite Crystal, Jazz Blue, Pitch Black, TorRed, and B5 Blue, while the colors that will run you an extra half grand include Ivory White Tri-Coat Pearl, Phantom Black Tri-coat Pearl, and Redline Tri-Coat Pearl.

All Hellcat Chargers come with the same lightweight wheel design, but those who want the Brass Monkey Bronze wheels can go that direction for $395 and to wrap those gorgeous wheels in 3-season performance tires will set you back another $195. Finally, if you want the black roof treatment, you can go that route for an additional $1,500.

On the inside, the 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat can be compared to a high end luxury car, with standard leather SRT performance seats with Alcantara inserts in black or bright red and black. Those who want a more luxurious look and feel can opt for a Laguna leather package in either black or sepia and black, for $1,795, while bright red seat belts can be added for $95 to brighten things up.

The Hellcat Charger comes with an impressive standard infotainment system, including the elaborate SRT Pages, but adding navigation runs an extra $695, and if you want a state of the art Harmon Kardon sound system connected to the infotainment system, that will add $1,995 to the bottom line. Lovers of the clear blue sky can add a sunroof to their Hellcat Charger for $1,195.

While you can drive off of the lot with an incredible super sedan for $64,990, adding every option to the 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat brings the price to $71,855 (Phantom Black Tri-coat Pearl paint, Brass Monkey wheels, 3-season tires, Laguna leather, red seats and seat belts, navigation, Harmon Kardon sound system, and sunroof, with gas-guzzler tax and destination fee). Oh, and ther’s also a black roof treatment, which would bring the price up to $73,355.

These are preliminary prices, which could change before the 2015 Charger SRT Hellcat arrives early next year, but these figures should be accurate enough to let those planning to buy a 707hp Mopar sedan figure out how much they will be spending to own the world’s most powerful mass-production sedan.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/12/hellcat-options-with-prices

Report Why the Charger Hellcat can’t be ordered with a manual transmission

Fans of truly irreverent amounts of horsepower will find lots to love in the form of the 2015 Dodge Challenger and Charger Hellcat models. Both of them send 707 ridiculous horsepower to the rear wheels; the only question is whether you want your absurdity delivered with two or four doors. Oh, and whether or not you want the option of a manual transmission.

If you prefer rowing your own gears, the choice is made for you; there is no manual gearbox option available on the Charger Hellcat, or any Charger model at all, for that matter. Wonder why? Well, besides the fact that almost nobody – sorry, clutch fans, but it’s true – would choose to buy a Charger with a manual transmission, that is? The answer, according to an industry insider in a post written on Jalopnik’s Opposite Lock forum, is the floorpan.

It’s probably not a surprise to most of our readers that the Dodge Challenger and Charger share a large portion of their chassis structure, which is codenamed LX at Chrysler, but there are still some significant differences under the skin due to the shorter wheelbase and two-door coupe bodyshell of the Challenger, as opposed to the sedan shape of the Charger. One of the differences is the floorpan, the huge chunk of sheetmetal that makes up the floor of the car and props up such essential items as the car’s seats.

According to user doodon2whls, the Dodge Challenger was crash tested way back in 2008 when it first hit the market with a floorpan stamping that can accommodate a manual transmission. The Charger, though, was crash tested and approved by the government two years earlier with the automatic-transmission floorpan stamping only, which means it would need to be completely recertified for sale in the US, with new crash tests included, if Dodge decided to offer it with a six-speed manual. That’s an expensive proposition, especially considering how few manual models Dodge would ever sell.

Good thing, then, that the eight-speed automatic transmission that Dodge pairs with pretty much all of its rear-wheel-drive vehicles is such a good unit. Having tested numerous Charger and Challenger models in all states of tune and with every available transmission option, we’re here to tell you that you’ll be plenty pleased with the Hellcat’s 707 horsepower, whether it’s being channeled through an automatic or manual transmission.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2014/11/16/charger-hellcat-no-manual-transmission-report/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

2015 Dodge Challenger V-6 8-Speed Automatic

With a turbo four-cylinder Ford Mustang now a real thing, we’re moved to reexamine the genre of the entry-level muscle car, long associated with secretarial pools and rental-car lots. Under discussion today: the V-6–powered Dodge Challenger SXT, sporting a new eight-speed transmission and a redesigned interior. Is it still more show than go?

It’s certainly still got “show.” For 2015, Dodge adds 1971 cues to the basic 1970 styling theme, including its split-port grille inserts and quad taillamp treatment. Other updates include headlamps with stern-looking LED halo rings and smoother front and rear fascias.

If the Challenger’s body changes only a little, an utter transformation occurs inside. Stylists placed a 1971 Challenger dashboard in the studio during the design process, and its influence can be found in the sweet, conical gauges with hidden needles and classic fonts. But, overall, this is a modern space, with strong forms, soft-touch panels, and real aluminum trim.

The 3.6-liter V-6 is unchanged, but the new ZF eight-speed automatic is a massive improvement, exploiting all of the engine’s 305 horsepower and 268 pound-feet of torque while helping to raise fuel economy from 18 mpg city/27 mpg highway to 19/30. Zero-to-60 acceleration drops a bit from 6.4 seconds to a respectable, if not-quite-muscle-car-worthy 6.2. The weighty Challenger trails its V-6–powered competitors by about a second.

So the eight-speed auto doesn’t bring much in the way of performance improvements, but it is a nice piece with smooth, decisive shifts and predictive downshifting in sport mode. Steering-wheel paddles come with the Super Track Pak option ($695), which also brings 20-inch wheels, a more buttoned-down suspension, revised steering, dual-piston front brake calipers around larger 13.6-inch front rotors, and Dodge Performance apps.

Hustling around Portland International Raceway, the SXT with the Super Track Pak could easily hang with the 485-hp Challenger SRT 392 in the kinkier sections thanks to communicative steering, Goodyear summer tires, strong brakes, and roughly 300 less pounds, most of them coming off the front axle. With the power­train settings in sport, the eight-speed always found the power band’s sweet spot, allowing us to simply leave it in drive and still post impressive lap times.

On the road, the V-6 proves competent and unobtrusive, though the handling never lets you forget that the Challenger is essentially a Charger sedan with a few less inches in the middle. Dive into a tight corner and the car lists at turn-in, finds its legs, then stabilizes with some throttle. The grip is there, but it drives big. Classic muscle-car stuff.

And yet, the Challenger SXT needs to be a bit quicker—and sound meaner—for us to consider it a true muscle car. That would help justify our loaded SXT Plus test car’s $37,255 price tag. But, especially with the Super Track Pak option, the V-6 Challenger is getting closer.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-challenger-v-6-8-speed-test-review

2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat First Drive Review

There’s an insuppressible sense of buoyancy among Dodge folks of late. Certainly, it can’t be attributed to the Dart compact or the complete lack of a Dodge-brand entry in the hugely popular mid-size-sedan segment. It’s not even that the Viper sports car has been newly re-Dodged after wearing only an SRT badge in 2013–14. No, the smiles on the faces of the Dodge Boys folks are on account of one special thing, and its name is Hellcat.

By now, you’ve surely heard about Dodge’s prodigious supercharged Hellcat V-8—that it takes 80 horsepower just to run its supercharger, which can suck the air from a 10-by-13-foot room in one minute, and that its fuel injectors can fill a pint glass in six seconds. Oh, and that it produces 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque, which turn the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat from a mere muscle car into a ballistic, five-seat supercar capable of hitting 60 mph in 3.6 seconds and passing the quarter-mile in 11.7 seconds at 126 mph, according to our first test, with a claimed top speed of 199 mph.

Now Dodge plunks that angry mill into the 2015 Charger SRT Hellcat to create the world’s most powerful production sedan. Dodge says it can rocket to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds on its way to an NHRA-certified quarter-mile at 11 seconds flat (on street tires), with a top speed of 204 mph. We have not yet tested those claims with our own equipment, but after our first stint behind the wheel in rural Virginia and West Virginia, including a few hours on-track at Summit Point Motorsports Park, we will verify its ability to create huge grins.

Big, fat, shit-eating grins. While the Charger may be the more, ahem, mature Hellcat, it created the same fits of uncontrollable gasping, giggling, and cursing every time we stabbed the go pedal. Like its two-door sibling, the Charger Hellcat is seriously fast, is no joke at the track, and makes sounds best described as NSFW. Yet the Charger is a friendlier, more approachable creature, thanks in large part to a suspension tuned more for street performance—“touring,” in car speak—than for track-day or drag-strip craziness.

“The philosophy is a little bit different,” said Russ Ruedisueli, head of engineering for SRT. “On the Challenger, we wanted the car to be sprung a little bit stiffer, there to be a little less roll. On the Charger, there’s more of an emphasis on ride. It’s not to say that you’ll be embarrassed out on the track, you know, but it’s not a ‘track car.’ ” Specifically, the springs and shocks are softer, the anti-roll bars aren’t quite as thick, and the amount of slip allowed by the traction and stability control is recalibrated. These changes make allowance for the four-door’s longer wheelbase, stated 4575-pound curb weight (probably close to accurate; our scales said the Challenger weighs 4488 while Dodge claimed 4439), and its 56/44 versus 57/43 weight distribution.

Yet it hardly embarrasses itself on a circuit. After switching all chassis and powertrain settings to “Track,” we tackled Summit Point and immediately got comfortable with the car’s sharp turn-in and tidy, predictable body motions. It always drives big (because, with a wheelbase of 120.4 inches, it is big), but the steering—hydraulically assisted for the Hellcat, versus electric for other Chargers—is talkative and ultimate grip is quite high. Powering hard out of the curves, the rear end breaks away gradually and predictably yet is easily catchable with a bit of opposite lock. Driven smoothly, this is not a scary cat.

Read more at: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-charger-srt-hellcat-first-drive-review

Hellcat Watch

Dodge Challenger Hellcat and Charger Hellcat buyers may want to supplement their powerful new car with a stylish new watch, sold by the Bozeman Watch Company and named after the same American naval fighter plane as the new supercharged Hemi engines. The watch costs around 10% of the car’s price — $6,125 (the price is slated to go up after production begins).

The Hellcat, whose engines were made by Nash, brought down 5,271 enemy fighters during the second half of World War II. Bozeman Watch’s web site claims the watch “pays homage to its namesake with its clean lines and a dial inspired by aviation instrumentation, highlighted by sleek skeletonized hands and crisp markings.”

The first edition will include two hundred watches, individually numbered, followed by “limited annual releases.”

Bozeman Watch Company, LLC is, not surprisingly, based in Bozeman, Montana.  The company has associates in Detroit, Michigan, Bozeman, Montana, and Europe.  A series of Montana-themed watches are sold as well as Hellcat; the showrooms are in Bozeman and Whitefish, Montana, and Birmingham, Michigan.    Each showroom has all of the mechanical watch models.

According to the company, each piece is developed first as a pencil illustration, then progresses to three-dimensional images, ready for part prototyping and tooling.  Mechanical movements are built to specification during the design process, and the whole process takes 18-39 months. All are certified Chronometers by the Controle Officiel Suisse des Chronometres; each movement (built by suppliers) undergoes 15 days of accuracy testing, to allow a guarantee of being in the top 3% for accuracy.  Final assembly is done in the United States.

The company also makes “dry goods” — computer cases (inlcuding the “Mac Bag” at $500) and other luggage items — in Montana.

Read more at: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/10/hellcat-watch

2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Auction Actually Raised $1.65M

he Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat that sold over the weekend actually raised more money for charity than first reported. . . a lot more!

After crossing the block at the Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas auction for an incredible $825,000, Dodge has announced that the Engelstad Family Foundation has matched the auction pricing bringing the total amount raised for charity to $1.65 million. With the generous donation, the grand total means the Challenger SRT Hellcat has raised more money for charity than any other car in Barrett-Jackson history. As icing on the cake, Barrett-Jackson waived all bidding and consignment fees so 100 percent of the sale price will go on to benefit Opportunity Village, a not-for-profit organization that serves people with significant intellectual disabilities in the Las Vegas area.

The winning bidder of the auction was none other than Rick Hendrick, owner of Hendrick Motorsports and several Chrysler Group dealerships. The auction package included a 6.2-liter supercharger engine cover and a HEMI Orange painted base presentation box with a VIN0001 electronic vehicle build book and a video documentary on an iPad Mini that shows the step-by-step build process of the car.

“The $1.65 million raised by auctioning this one-of-one Dodge Challenger Hellcat at this year’s Barrett-Jackson auction means the most powerful muscle car ever will also have a very powerful impact on the people who benefit from the services of Opportunity Village,” said Tim Kuniskis, President and CEO, Dodge and SRT Brands, Chrysler Group LLC. “The VIN0001 muscle car was not only one of the hottest cars that rolled through the Barrett-Jackson auction lanes, it is also the ultimate collectible 2015 Dodge Challenger as Dodge is ensuring there will never be another one like it.”

Read more at: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2014/09/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-auction-actually-raised-1-65m.html