Archive for the ‘car’ Tag

To Idle or Not to Idle, That is the Question

It is that time of the year when many motorists let their vehicle “warm up” or idle before driving. In fact, today’s modern cars are ready to drive in cold temperatures without excessive idling, says the Car Care Council.

“Unless you are trying to defrost the windshield or warm the interior of your car, idling is not required for today’s vehicles,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “In most cases, idling longer than 30 seconds is unnecessary. The best way to warm up your car’s engine is to drive gently at the start. Remember, a vehicle gets zero miles per gallon when idling and the result is lower fuel economy and wasted money.”

The idea of idling before driving dates back to when cars were built with carburetors. With new fuel-injection technology, complex computer systems and thinner synthetic oils, drivers don’t need to warm up their cars before hitting the road.

Winter Car Care Tips- Warming UpAccording to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “When a car idles for more than 30 seconds, it has several negative effects, such as increasing air pollution unnecessarily, wasting fuel and money, and causing excessive wear or even damaging a car’s engine components, including cylinders, spark plugs, and the exhaust system. Contrary to popular belief, idling isn’t an effective way to warm up most car engines.”

The non-profit Car Care Council has a free 80-page Car Care Guide for motorists that features several pages of fuel economy and environmental awareness tips. Available in English and Spanish, the popular guide uses easy-to-understand everyday language rather than technical automotive jargon, fits easily in a glove box and can be ordered by visiting http://www.carcare.org/car-care-guide.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s popular Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

As read on: http://www.carcare.org/2015/01/idle-idle-question/

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Top 5 Car De-Icing Myths

Impatient drivers trying to remove ice from windshields often discover creative ways to break the glass. Top five vehicle de-icing myths:

1. Pouring hot water on the vehicle’s windshield and windows will melt the ice. It might melt the ice, but it can also shatter the windshield due to the extreme temperature change.

2. Tap the ice on the car windshield with a hammer to break the ice into pieces to pick off the glass. If that doesn’t work, hammer on a screwdriver or ice pick. This usually results in an impact hole or a large crack.

3. Scrape the ice off the truck windshield with a metal ice scraper, key, spatula, utility knife or crowbar. The metal either scratches or cuts grooves in the glass.

4. Use a propane torch to melt the ice. Not only is this dangerous to the torchbearer, but this also can unintentionally melt the glass from the high temperature of the torch.

5. Pour or spray a mixture of vinegar and water on the windshield so that it freezes to the glass before the rain does, thereby preventing ice. Unfortunately, vinegar eats pits into the windshield glass.

These ideas might work however they will ultimately cost you more money in repair costs. Below is a list of the proper ways to de-ice your car and windows. In the winter months it is just safer, and more cost effective to allow extra time to properly warm your vehicle.

1. Check to make sure no ice or snow is obstructing the vehicle’s tailpipe. If it is covered, the ice or snow must be removed to prevent the possibility of carbon monoxide poisoning inside the vehicle.

2. If the car door is frozen shut with ice, pour cold water to gradually melt the ice and use a plastic ice scraper to carefully chip a crack in the ice around the door seal and the lock. Do not try to “unseal” the door by using a hair dryer, cigarette lighter, ice pick, screwdriver, propane torch or portable heater.

3. Start the vehicle and use the defroster setting to warm the glass. Wait at least five minutes for the car to start to warm up.

4. When the ice in contact with the windshield is melting, use a plastic ice scraper and a soft plastic bristle brush or broom to clear the ice. A squeegee also helps.

There are de-icing products on the market that may shorten the time it takes to melt the ice, but the results vary based on weather situations. Again, the best plan is to make extra time to properly warm and de-ice your car or if you lucky to have an indoor parking spot, use that during the winter months!

Tips found on: http://www.pitchengine.com/glassdoctor/glass-doctor-busts-top-5-car-deicing-myths-saves-windshields

Behind the Numbers: Chrysler Group U.S. Sales

On the surface, numbers are just numbers.

But, if you dig a little deeper, you can get perspective.

And, that’s what we tried to do for Chrysler Group’s September 2013 U.S. sales, which grew 1% from September 2012 to 143,017. Read the below and then give us your perspective on our September U.S. sales.

With truck/SUV/crossover sales flat at 0% growth, and slightly down in raw numbers from September 2012, car sales grew 3% and accounted for a bit more than 30% of our total vehicle sales. Last September, car sales were 29% of our total vehicle sales.

While Jeep® brand sales were down 5% last month to 37,464 (from 39,245), you could make the case it was still a strong month given that the brand had to overcome the loss of Jeep Liberty sales of about 5,600 from September 2012. For September 2013, Jeep Grand Cherokee sales were up 19% to 14,906. Jeep Patriot sales were up 12% to 6,053. Jeep Compass sales were up 27% to 4,487. Jeep Wrangler sales were slightly down by less than 1%, to 11,984.

For those LX fans, it was a very strong month: Dodge Charger +49% to 8,713 sold, Chrysler 300 +6% to 5,036 sold and Dodge Challenger +22% to 3,932 sold. It was the best September ever for Dodge Challenger

For the plant* rivalry, Windsor, Ont., vehicles totaled 22,002, while Detroit’s JNAP vehicles sales were 19,870, followed closely by Belvidere, Ill., at 18,462.

Heading in to the final quarter of 2013, year-to-date sales are 82% of 2012 totals, and 99% of 2011 total sales.

As read on: http://blog.chryslerllc.com/blog.do?id=2174&p=entry