Archive for the ‘aaa’ Tag

Gas prices below $2 a gallon for 1st time since ’09

Gasoline just keeps getting cheaper in Michigan, where the average pump price dropped Thursday to $1.97 a gallon — the lowest since March 2009.

Prices on New Year’s Day 2015 were down 13 cents in the past seven days, AAA Michigan said. Gas was 42% cheaper than it was one year ago, when the average price per gallon was $3.37.

“Gas prices continue to drop due to a significant decline in crude oil costs,” auto club spokeswoman Susan Hiltz said. “Crude oil represents about two-thirds of the cost of gasoline and is directly correlated with changes in gas prices.”

Dearborn-based AAA Michigan surveys fuel costs at 2,800 Michigan gas stations daily.

The latest price report marks a dramatic turnaround in gas prices. The statewide average peaked at $3.96 a gallon on June 16 before beginning a steady decline, according to the auto club. The national average also hit its 2014 high in June, reaching about $3.66 a gallon.

Nationwide, the average gas price was $2.24 a gallon Thursday, AAA said. It said drivers in the Midwest were paying the least for gas, while the most expensive prices in the contiguous 48 states were in the Northeast. Only Alaska at $3.09 and Hawaii at $3.53 a gallon averaged more than $3 this week.

If Michigan’s sub-$2 prices seem too good to last, they probably are, senior petroleum analyst Patrick DeHaan with GasBuddy told the Detroit Free Press. But even as prices make their expected rise, they probably will remain under $3 a gallon through 2015, he said.

“This may be getting as close to as good as it gets,” said DeHaan.

As read on: http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2015/01/02/gas-prices-michigan/21178567/

$2 Gas Is Back! Is That Good?

If you’ve been to a gas station in recent weeks, you know that fuel prices are low — crazy low. That seems like a good thing, but is it?

Yes and no.

According to AAA, today’s price for a gallon of unleaded regular averages $2.67. In some parts of the country, you can find it for $2.50, and even cheaper at discount stations. This time last month, the price was nearly 30 cents higher ($2.94), and a year ago, it was more than 75 cents higher ($3.27).

So, what’s the deal? There are a range of factors keeping fuel prices low, but two stick out:

1. We’re in the middle of “winter gas” season. “Winter gas” — technically, just “gas” — is easier to produce than “summer gas”, which is required by law to contain more additives so that it burns more cleanly and efficiently in hot weather. That makes winter gas comparatively cheap, but that’s just part of the explanation for today’s low fuel prices.

When refineries switch from one type of gas to the other, they scale back on the outgoing version to ensure that they can sell all of the inventory they have. Those slowdowns in production cause artificial shortages, which cause prices to spike — usually around May and September. Now, in December, we’re well into the cheaper winter gas season, and the summer gas changeover is a long way off, so prices are very low.

2. Oil production in the U.S. is booming. Thanks to new extraction techniques, the U.S. is experiencing a golden age of oil production. While we still depend on imported oil for some of our supply, the country now produces enough gas and diesel to be a net exporter.

That sounds like good news — and it is for some. For others, not so much.

WINNERS

Those who stand to benefit the most from low oil and gas prices are:

Consumers: As the U.S. economy continues to improve, inflation has begun creeping upward. Unfortunately, U.S. wages aren’t keeping pace, meaning that the money workers earn doesn’t go as far as it might. Low fuel prices give consumers a break, allowing them to focus their spending on food, mortgages, education, and the like. Some argue that cheap gas also slows auto sales by allowing owners of gas-guzzlers to keep their rides a bit longer, though there are people who disagree with that, including…

Makers of trucks and SUVs: Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, and other makers of pickup trucks and large SUVs are doing bang-up business these days. That’s in part because the truck-loving construction sector is humming along, but also because consumers aren’t put off by the lackluster fuel economy most pickups and SUVs earn. (Though it bears mentioning that more fuel-efficient, car-based crossovers are also selling like hotcakes.)

LOSERS

Not everyone is happy about cheap gas, though:

Oil-producing states and countries: States that depends on oil for their revenue — either from producing the stuff or refining it — now find themselves in a bind. Soon, they’re likely to be forced to make painful budget cuts, trimming funds for schools, hospitals, and other important community resources. Farther afield, in countries that derive most of their income from oil, the situation is much worse. If things don’t change, low oil prices could destabilize entire nations, leading to humanitarian crises, mass emigrations, and in extreme cases, terrorism.

Eco-advocates: Campaigns for reduced auto pollution and greenhouse gas emissions work best when gas prices are on the upswing. With fuel prices so low, there’s little incentive for consumers to shell out the extra dough needed to buy hybrids like the Toyota Prius, much less all-electric models like the Tesla Model S.

Automakers: The Environmental Protection Agency has set strict guidelines on fuel economy and auto emissions leading up to the year 2025, and automakers are working hard to create fleets that can meet those standards. All that new technology comes at a premium, though, and low fuel prices mean that customers may be more inclined to shell out for less fuel-efficient models while they can. (Then again, who knows?)

Mother Nature: Low fuel prices typically translate into upticks in travel, meaning greater auto emissions. That means more air pollution and more greenhouse gases, which at the very least make breathing more difficult and at worst, increase global warming.

WILL THESE PRICES STICK AROUND?

Like it or not, fuel prices aren’t likely to stay this low for long. Even if OPEC changes its mind and decides to scale back production, sending crude prices higher, we’ll soon reach the changeover to “summer gas”, which should cause prices at the pump to climb.

In other words: get now while the getting is good.

As read on: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1095806_2-gas-is-back-is-that-good/page-2

Michigan gas prices tumble to 10-month low

Gasoline prices in Michigan tumbled to their lowest point in about 10 months, and analysts expect prices to keep falling.

The average price of an unleaded gallon of gasoline fell to $3.27, down 13 cents from a week ago, according to AAA.

In metro Detroit, it was a similar story. The average price dropped 10 cents to $3.31 per gallon.

“Decreased demand, relatively lower crude prices and the cost savings associated with producing winter-blend fuel will likely keep downward pressure on the price for retail gasoline,” AAA Michigan said in a statement. “Barring any major disruptions in supply, drivers are expected to see some of the lowest autumn prices since 2010.”

Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst of GasBuddy.com, said prices are heading below the $3 mark.

“We’re really looking at wholesale prices that point to not just lower, but they’re dramatically lower,” Kloza said in an interview. “It’s coming fairly soon.”

In fact, stations in Greenville and Ionia have already reduced prices to below the $3 mark.

The lowest average price for a Michigan region is $3.14 in the Grand Rapids-Muskegon-Holland region. Marquette has the highest price at $3.49.

More than a dozen gas stations in metro Detroit are charging $3.07 or less, though most of those prices are cash only, according to GasBuddy.com.

Kloza said a confluence of factors are driving prices down.

The price of crude oil has been falling, hitting the $90 mark, and Bloomberg reported Thursday that betting on the future price of oil hit a 17-month low last week.

Refineries in the Midwest have also ended maintenance initiatives in recent weeks, increasing supplies and lowering prices further.

Political turmoil in the Middle East has had little effect on gas prices, economists noted.

“Geopolitical events remain front of mind for market watchers, but in recent months have not translated into upward pressure on global oil markets,” AAA said.

Kloza said the price of crude oil has fallen despite ISIS violence in Iraq and Syria, indicating that the market is not concerned that continued fighting will disrupt the flow of oil.

Still, he cautioned that $3 gasoline isn’t necessarily here to stay.

“I don’t think that becomes the new normal,” he said. “I do think that becomes a level that people will get used to in the offseason.”

Read more at: http://www.freep.com/story/money/business/michigan/2014/10/06/gasoline-prices-metro-detroit/16796443/

Top Booster Seat Mistakes

1. Letting your child use a regular seat belt too soon.

Why it’s unsafe: Seat belts are designed for an adult and can cause seriously injuries if they don’t fit properly.

What AAA recommends: Use a booster seat until the adult seat belt fits properly with the lap portion of the belt fitting low across the child’s hips and the shoulder belt across their sternum and collar bone. Proper belt fit may not be possible in some cases until age 12 or 13.

2. Allowing children to place the seat belt under their arm or behind their back when using a booster seat.

Why it’s unsafe: Improperly worn seat belts can cause injuries! A seat belt placed under the arm can cause fragile ribs to break which can in turn cause additional injury. A seat belt behind the back eliminates upper body protection and can cause serious spinal injury or even ejection.

What AAA recommends: Make sure children wear their seat belt properly with their booster seat and remain in proper position the whole trip.

3. Skipping a booster seat when carpooling or riding with friends

Why it’s unsafe: Most crashes occur close to home and can occur at any time – even a one-time exception could result in serious injury.

What AAA recommends: Don’t compromise safety for convenience. Use a booster on every trip and make arrangements in advance when carpooling to ensure your child has their booster seat.

4. Using a low back booster in a seat without head rests.

Why it’s unsafe: Riding in a backless booster seat in a vehicle with no head restraint can cause head, neck and spinal injuries in a crash or sudden stop.

What AAA recommends: Make sure your vehicle has head restraints to protect your child before considering using a backless booster seat. If not, use a high back seat that offers head/neck protection.

5. Not buckling in empty booster seats.

Why it’s unsafe: Booster seats that are not in use can go flying in a sudden stop or crash and cause injury if they are not buckled in the vehicle.

What AAA recommends: Buckle up booster seats even when children are not riding in the car to keep yourself and other passengers safe.

As read on: http://safeseats4kids.aaa.com/top-booster-seat-mistakes/?sf31132198=1

What to do after you have been in an accident

1. Keep an Emergency Kit in Your Glove Compartment. Drivers should carry a cell phone, as well as pen and paper for taking notes, a disposable camera to take photos of the vehicles at the scene, and a card with information about medical allergies or conditions that may require special attention if there are serious injuries. Also, keep a list of contact numbers for law enforcement agencies handy. Drivers can keep this free fill-in-the-blanks accident information form in their glove compartment.

2. Keep Safety First. Drivers involved in minor accidents with no serious injuries should move cars to the side of the road and out of the way of oncoming traffic. Leaving cars parked in the middle of the road or busy intersection can result in additional accidents and injuries. If a car cannot be moved, drivers and passengers should remain in the cars with seatbelts fastened for everyone’s safety until help arrives. Make sure to turn on hazard lights and set out cones, flares or warning triangles if possible.

3. Exchange Information. After the accident, exchange the following information: name, address, phone number, insurance company, policy number, driver license number and license plate number for the driver and the owner of each vehicle. If the driver’s name is different from the name of the insured, establish what the relationship is and take down the name and address for each individual. Also make a written description of each car, including year, make, model and color — and the exact location of the collision and how it happened. Finally, be polite but don’t tell the other drivers or the police that the accident was your fault, even if you think it was.

4. Photograph and Document the Accident. Use your camera to document the damage to all the vehicles. Keep in mind that you want your photos to show the overall context of the accident so that you can make your case to a claims adjuster. If there were witnesses, try to get their contact information; they may be able to help you if the other drivers dispute your version of what happened.

5. File An Accident Report. Although law enforcement officers in many locations may not respond to accidents unless there are injuries, drivers should file a state vehicle accident report, which is available at police stations and often on the Department of Motor Vehicles Web site as a downloadable file. A police report often helps insurance companies speed up the claims process.

6. Know What Your Insurance Covers. The whole insurance process will be easier following your accident if you know the details of your coverage. For example, don’t wait until after an accident to find out that your policy doesn’t automatically cover costs for towing or a replacement rental car. Generally, for only a dollar or two extra each month, you can add coverage for rental car reimbursement, which provides a rental car for little or no money while your car is in the repair shop or if it is stolen. Check your policy for specifics.

The final question in dealing with an accident is usually who will pay for the damages? If the accident was minor, you and the other drivers may decide to handle the damages yourselves without the involvement of an insurance company. But this isn’t always the best idea, for several reasons.

While the other driver may agree to pay for the damage to your car on the day of the accident, he may see the repair bills and decide it’s too high. At this point, time has passed and your insurance company will have more difficulty piecing together the evidence if you file a claim.

Also, keep in mind that you have no way of knowing whether another driver will change his mind and report the accident to his insurance company. He may even claim injuries that weren’t apparent at the scene of the accident. This means that your insurance company may end up paying him a hefty settlement, or worse yet, you could be dragged into a lawsuit. So make sure that your company has your version of what happened and check your policy — if the damages paid out by your insurance company are below a certain amount, the accident may not be considered chargeable. And you will avoid the penalty of a premium hike.

Auto accidents take a tremendous toll on everyone involved, both financially and emotionally. If you’re one of the lucky ones who have thus far avoided a serious accident, hopefully the tips on prevention will help keep it that way. The chances are high, though, that at some point you will be involved in a minor accident. Just keep your head and make safety your primary concern. You’ll have plenty of time to deal with the consequences later.

As read on: http://www.edmunds.com/car-safety/what-to-do-after-a-car-accident.html?articleid=43805

10 tips for driving on ice and snow

Whether you are a new driver or an experienced one, poor weather conditions can test your nerves and skills on the road. We have already had a few days of white-knuckle driving this season as winter storms have pounded areas across the state. And there are sure to be more stormy days to come.

Studies show that nearly one-quarter of weather-related vehicle crashes occur on snowy, slushy or icy pavement. But there are a few steps you can take to ensure you, and your vehicle, are ready for these adverse road conditions. Following these tips can help you get to your destination and back home safely.

Regular Maintenance Safe winter driving begins before you even get into your vehicle. Following the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance schedule is important, but it carries more weight during the winter season when being stranded is not only inconvenient, but downright unpleasant and even dangerous.

Remove ice and snow from your vehicle

Clear all snow and ice from the entire vehicle – hood, roof, trunk, windows, lights and signals. It’s important to make sure you can see and be seen by other drivers. Inspect your vehicle.

Check your tires, wiper blades, fluids, lights, belts and hoses. Make sure tires are properly inflated and the tread is in good condition. Cold temperatures can lower tire pressure. Check monthly and top off as necessary.

Keep your gas tank at least half full

Following this rule of thumb is good practice every day of the year to avoid the bad experience of running out of gas. But in cold weather months, you may need to change your route or could find yourself caught in a traffic delay, and you do not want to have the needle resting on empty in these scenarios.

With the car prepped for travel, keep these 10 driving tips in mind.

Safety On The Road

Reduce your speed. Adjust to changing conditions and allow extra time to reach your destination.

Keep windows clear. Switching on the air conditioner can remove moisture from inside the vehicle and improve defroster performance.

Give the car ahead of you extra space. Braking on a slippery surface requires more distance, so increase your distance with the car ahead. The recommended following distance on dry roads is three to four seconds. This should be increased to eight to 10 seconds for wet or icy roads.

Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Use lower gears to keep traction, especially on hills.

Make smooth, careful movements. Avoid skids by anticipating lane changes, turns and curves. Steering in icy conditions requires smooth and careful movements. Abrupt movements break traction and can start a skid. If your vehicle starts to skid, steer into the direction of the slide.

Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly when pulling out of the driveway or from a stop sign is the best way to regain traction and avoid slipping or sliding. It also takes longer to slow down on icy roads. So at intersections, allow for long, slow and steady stops to avoid skids.

Know your brakes. Locked wheels can make your vehicle slide or skid. If your vehicle has antilock brakes, which newer model cars have, push the brake pedal firmly and hold it down. The pedal will vibrate and pulse against your foot, but this is normal. Do not pump the pedal or remove your foot. The system is working as it was designed to work. If you do not have antilock brakes, still apply firm, steady pressure.

Do not use cruise control. When driving on a slippery surface, such as rain or ice, never use cruise control. You want to be able to respond immediately, if you start losing traction.

Use extra caution on bridges, ramps and overpasses. These areas are likely to freeze first and stay frozen during a winter storm.

Stay focused, alert, and aware. Be aware of what’s going on around you. Actions by other vehicles may alert you to problems more quickly or give you time to react safely.

Handling an Emergency

While preventative measures go a long way to keep you safe on the road, unexpected weather or vehicle problems still arise. If an emergency should develop on the road, an emergency roadside kit with winter supplies is a valuable asset. Kit contents can include a cell phone and car charger; blankets; flashlight with extra batteries; a first-aid kit; drinking water; a small shovel; a sack of sand, cat litter or traction mats; windshield scraper and brush; battery booster cables; and emergency flares or reflectors.

Driving on ice and snow can be challenging, but it is possible to be a safe and prepared driver despite winter’s less than optimal driving conditions. The key is to be aware and adapt to the conditions. And if it is really bad outside, and you do not have to go out, stay in. Enjoy the snow from indoors.

Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=151&sid=23732091#YHLwlGUsbtYywTb3.99

AAA Tips for Picking and Paying for the ‘Right’ New Car

Buying a new vehicle takes time, research and eventually money.  So when the occasion comes to purchase a new car, it’s not a choice that should be made lightly. To help consumers, AAA offers a checklist of factors to consider when looking for the ‘right’ new car.

“Today’s consumers have more choices than ever when it comes to picking a new vehicle, but that also means the selection process can be much more difficult,” said John Nielsen, AAA’s Director of Automotive Engineering and Repair. “There are numerous factors to consider, many of which take place long before a buyer ever hits a car lot.”

When shopping for a new vehicle, AAA recommends the following:

  • Determine What Is Affordable. Before considering any specific makes or models, sit down with the household budget and determine what is affordable before visiting a car lot. AAA’s financial services experts advise that no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of your total monthly budget should go to all car-related expenses. Consider the value of your trade-in and how much cash you want to put towards the vehicle purchase. Consult with an insurance agent to get a rough estimate of premiums on the type of vehicle being considered. AAA insurance agents can be located at AAA.com.
  • Evaluate Driving Habits. Take a realistic look at how the vehicle will be used. What types of trips will it be used for most frequently? How many passengers will the vehicle need to carry? How long of a commute will it need to accommodate? Will the vehicle be driven on the highway? Will you need extra cargo space?
  • List Needed Features (Current and Future). Make a list of all required features the new vehicle should include, being careful to separate ‘wants’ from ‘needs.’ How much seating? How much cargo? Minimum fuel economy? When making the list, think about needs today and those several years down the road. Could children be in the future? Could the commute lengthen?
  • Consider Depreciation Costs. The biggest yearly expense to new cars is depreciation. Research how much the models being considered depreciate within the first few years and consider a model that has a track record of holding its value longer. The new AAA Auto Buying Tools App can assist consumers shopping for a new vehicle by providing all of the information they need to make an educated decision by visiting AAA.com/AutoBuying or by downloading the AAA Auto Buying Tools app from the iTunes App Store. The app can build the car you want, including options and available incentives, while viewing pricing information, crash safety ratings, AAA reviews, images and more.
  • New or New to You. Look at pricing options for both new vehicles, as well as models that are one to two years old. There are benefits to both new and slightly used models. New vehicles typically come with longer warranties, buying incentives from the automaker, the latest features and are widely available. Slightly used vehicles might offer a price break, but it can be more difficult to find the ‘perfect’ vehicle with the exact features a buyer is seeking and does not have buying incentives from the manufacturer.
  • Review Warranty and Maintenance Costs. Review the length of the warranty of vehicles being considered and exactly what it covers. Investigate the maintenance costs associated with the car by reviewing its recommended maintenance schedule and calculating new costs of regularly needed maintenance items. If the buyer consistently uses the same repair shop, ask how the cost of maintaining the new vehicle will compare with the current vehicle.  AAA Approved Auto Repair shops are located across North America and are excellent sources of trusted maintenance information.  The nearest shop can be located by visiting AAA.com/repair.
  • Investigate Safety Ratings and Features. Check the safety ratings of all models under consideration from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Evaluate the safety features available on each model. If using a car seat for a child, check the accessibility to the vehicle’s LATCH system and the ease of installing a child passenger safety seat.
  • Seek Recommendations and Reviews. Ask friends, family and colleagues for feedback on their vehicles. Read professional reviews provided by AAA’s Auto Buying experts at AAA.com/AutoBuying, and feedback from current owners of the models being considered. These can often be found on web forums.
  • Don’t Limit Choice to One Vehicle. Narrow the choices to two or three vehicles that meet all the criteria, but do not narrow it down to only one. By allowing flexibility, buyers have more negotiating room and a better chance of finding the best possible price.
  • Financing is Key. AAA financial services experts advise that consumers gain a distinct advantage in the car buying process by arriving at the dealership with financing in hand.  Carefully and thoroughly shop loan options and available interest rates in advance. Inching down a loan’s interest rate even a percentage point or two can save hundreds of dollars over the life of the car loan.  Match the length of the loan to the length of ownership.  Select your loan term based on how long you plan to own the vehicle and make sure your loan has no prepayment penalty.

AAA can help consumers save for major purchases like buying a new vehicle.  Building a sound savings strategy is the best way to prepare for the future and different savings options offer different benefits to help you reach your goals.  AAA members can learn more at AAA.com/deposits.

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial and automotive-related services. Since its founding in 1902, the not-for-profit, fully tax-paying AAA has been a leader and advocate for the safety and security of all travelers. AAA clubs can be visited on the Internet at AAA.com.

As read on: http://newsroom.aaa.com/2012/03/aaa-offers-tips-for-picking-and-paying-for-the-right-new-car/?sf17594182=1

What to do when you get a Flat Tire…

Let’s face it – no one wants to have a flat tire, especially when the end result is being stranded on the side of the road with other cars whizzing by almost smug in their four-good-wheel conditions. But there’s more to flat tires than the annoyance and frustration they breed.

Anatomy of a Flat Tire

When a tire loses all of its air, it also loses its buoyancy and the ability to bear weight. Except in the sorts of tires known as “run flat,” the sidewalls are too weak to support the weight of a vehicle without the added strength of air pressure.

Any tire, new or old, can go flat if it is punctured, or if it’s leaking for some ofther reason. Generally speaking, the thicker treads on new tires are more resistant to punctures than older, worn-out treads, but those deeper treats can also increase the risk of a puncture if you drive over a nail or some other sharp object, by “channeling ” the object deep between the treads.

Sometimes tires go flat when a vehicle has been sitting still for too long – weeks or months in a cold garage, for example – or if there’s a slow leak. This is why it’s a wise idea to make a visual inspection of all four of your car’s tires before driving it.  Flat tires look sort of mushy, and may bulge slightly.

If a tire goes flat while you’re driving, you’ll hear and feel a thump-thump-thump vibration from your vehicle’s suspension, and, at least in the case of a front tire, your vehicle will pull toward the side that has gone flat.

Do Not Drive

Either way, you should never continue driving on a flat. Without any internal air pressure the sidewalls of the tire will be pinched between the road and the wheel rim, and driving even as much as half a mile could be enough to either cut the tire, or damage the wheel.

This is equally important if the air pressure in your tire is merely low, and not completely gone. You can do serious damage to both the tire and the wheel, necessitating the replacement of both.
In addition to the risk to the tire and wheel, driving on an under-inflated or flat tire puts you at risk because your car will have less control, and things like turning will take more effort and offer less response. At the very least, you’ll experience significant drag.

If You Get a Flat Tire While Driving

Slow down and pull over to the side of the road as soon as it’s safe to do so. Never stop in the middle of the road, especially if you’re on a busy highway – you’re likely to get rear-ended or killed.
Put your car as far onto the right shoulder as you can, to reduce the risk of someone running into you. This also leaves room in case it’s a tire on the left side of the car that must be changed.
Turn on your hazard lights, so other drivers will see you. It’s also  a good idea to raise the hood, as this is a universal signal for help, and helps make the profile of your car bigger and more visible. If it’s dark or foggy and you have a safety flare, warning light, or reflective triangle, place it a bit behind your vehicle as an additional alert to other drivers.
If you have the necessary tools to change your tire, go ahead and do so, being as swift and as sure as you can. If your spare tire is a “donut” – a smaller than average tire – be aware that it’s meant for temporary use only.
If you don’t have the right tools, either call your insurance company’s or auto club’s roadside assistance number, or call the police or highway patrol for help. If you’re one of the five people left on the planet who don’t have a cell phone, or if your cell phone has no signal, you may have to wait for someone to drive by, or hope that another driver offers assistance. Be careful with the latter. Most people are really kind and helpful, but some are much less scrupulous.
Wait for help outside the vehicle whenever possible, standing away from the road. If the neighborhood where you’re stranded seems dangerous, or if there’s inclement weather, stay inside your car.

After a Flat Tire

So you’ve changed your flat tire. Now what?

If you’re driving on a donut, you’ll want to bring your old tire to your mechanic or a local tire store to have it repaired (if possible) or replaced. Make sure that if you do this, you get the donut back, so that you can return it to you car, in case of another flat.

If the spare tire is simply an extra full-sized tire, have the old one repaired, or replace it, and store it as your “new” spare.

The tire that has been replaced will not have the same wear on its treads as the rest of your tires do, so be prepared for driving to feel a bit uneven. This may be a good time to consider having your tires rotated.

Flat tires are inconvenient, at best, and dangerous if they occur in the middle of a busy highway. Knowing what to expect and how to handle it doesn’t reduce the annoyance, but it should help you approach your next flat tire with a bit more calm.

Article courtesy of: http://www.estatecarinsure.com/essays/flat_tires.htm