Archive for the ‘300’ Tag

You have an RT even if you have an SE

Back in 2014, Chrysler added an extended warranty to early 3.6 liter V6 engines. The otherwise highly reliable engine could have a flaw in the left-hand cylinder head, which made itself known only under an odd set of circumstances (that was relatively common in Wranglers). Knowing that, Chrysler covered it for parts and labor for a good long time — 150,000 miles or ten years, whichever came first.

Pentastar V6 engines

The extended warranty covered the 2011, 2012, and early-2013 Grand Cherokee, Wrangler, Durango, minivans, 200, Avenger, Journey, Challenger, Charger, and 300 with engine sales code ERB, if a trouble code of P0300, P0302, P0304, or P0306 was set (for a misfire in cylinder 2, 4, 6, or a combination of cylinders).

Some customers were confused by the service bulletin itself, when they saw it, since it refers to the cars by body code. The Caravan listing has (RT) next to it, suggesting that only the RT (R/T) trim level was covered. In this case, though, RT is a body code, not a model; the Caravan SE is an RT-body. Confusing, yes, but, really, only for that generation of Caravans. Oh, and the LX cars (for 2011-13, that’s just the 300), since Chrysler used to have LX as a model (along with LXi).

Fortunately, Chrysler never used JC, JK, JS, LC, LD, WD, or WK as trim levels.

U.S. dealers should have details as part of warranty bulletin D-14-12, dated June 10, 2014. Other warranty bulletins were SAB-2014-11 (Canada), BG-22-14 (Mexico), ID-14-04 (Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands), and ID-14-03 (everywhere else).

Chrysler’s Pentastar V6 engines were critically acclaimed for their power, economy, and quiet operation; they have generally been trouble-free after the head issues were resolved.

Read more at: https://www.allpar.com/news/2019/02/you-have-an-rt-even-if-you-have-an-se-43801?fbclid=IwAR1OEj0U0BiGQIAfA6IktibCQNU7GOt2s1xFaFrxXTsFfZytxSIxSx4ueaE

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THE LATEST STYLE AND TECHNOLOGY FROM THE NEW 2017 CHRYSLER 300

The new 2017 Chrysler 300 is celebrating more than nine decades of American ingenuity. The bold sedan remains a leader in sophistication and technology by staying ahead of the curve with a commitment to cutting-edge tech and performance.

The class-exclusive1 Rotary E-shift eight-speed automatic transmission is standard on every model, delivering up to 30 mpg highway on V6 models2, plus best-in-class V6 and V8 driving range.1 All Chrysler 300 models are available with an advanced AWD system, which includes an active transfer case and front-axle-disconnect system to improve real-world fuel economy.

With top-of-the-line performance at your fingertips, the new 2017 Chrysler 300 was also engineered with a dedication to innovation in appearance and technology, including the new Sports Appearance Package and the Fourth-Generation Uconnect® System. Here’s a bit of what the New Year has in store.

New Packages, Options and Colors on 300S

The new available S Model Appearance Package on the 2017 Chrysler 300 provides an even more athletic look to the blacked-out 2017 Chrysler 300S model. The S Model Appearance Package amplifies the attitude with a black chrome grille surround, a more aggressive front fascia, unique LED fog lamps, plus a deck-lid spoiler (included with V8 engine, available on 300S with V6 engine). On the interior, available heated and ventilated Napa leather-trimmed performance seats with high-bolstered suede contours provide both comfort and edgy style to the 300S.

A new Ceramic Gray exterior color option on 300S provides a “straight shade” hue for a truly avant-garde look. Inside, a new available Black/Smoke Gray color scheme pairs perfectly with the overall athletic style of the 300S.

Fourth-Generation Uconnect® System

It’s only fitting that a vehicle with so much power and style would offer technology to match. With the new fourth-generation Uconnect® system making its debut in the new 2017 Chrysler 300, drivers will enjoy the latest available smartphone integration. For iPhone® mobile device users, Apple CarPlay® enables access to Apple Maps, messages, phone and Apple Music through Siri Voice control or the Uconnect 8.4-inch touchscreen. For those who use an Android™ phone, Android Auto enables easy and safe access to Google voice search, Google Maps and Google Play music via the touchscreen or steering wheel-mounted controls. In addition, the new Uconnect system includes performance improvements with faster startup time, enhanced processing power, vivid imagery, plus higher resolution and sharper graphics. And the new 8.4-inch touchscreens with available navigation offer multi-touch gestures with pinch, tap and swipe capability.

Learn more about the style and technology of the new 2017 Chrysler 300 at chrysler.com/300.

1Based on the latest available competitive information and the FCA US LLC Upper Large Car Segmentation.

2EPA estimated 30 hwy mpg with 3.6L V6 engine and eight-speed automatic transmission. Actual mileage may vary.

Read more at: https://blog.chrysler.com/uncategorized/latest-style-technology-new-2017-chrysler-300/

Chrysler compact still coming

The Chrysler compact car, normally referred to as the 100, is still on the way, according to both the company’s strategic plan and insiders.

Some believe the forthcoming Chrysler is closely linked to the new Fiat Linea replacement, which will be unveiled shortly. It seems likely that most of the work will be done by Fiat, which traditionally has more expertise in small cars, especially since Chrysler itself has its hands full with yet more revisions to its pickups, work on next-generation large cars, Dart upgrades, nine-speed fixes, the next-generation Compass, new minivans, possibly bringing over a Ram version of the big Daily commercial van, and other projects.

At minimum, Chrysler is likely to retune the suspension to fit American roads, and adjust the interior and exterior styling to match American tastes. Unfortunately, the Microsoft-based Fiat Blue & Me system, now renamed UConnect, may be the only connectivity system available, at least on lower models.

The company recently trademarked the Hornet name, first used by Hudson for its only “small” car, then used by AMC (the company formed by the merger of Hudson and Nash), and made famous by the movie Cars. So far, there has been no indication of what the name might be used on — they may replace Dart or Avenger with Hornet, or set up a midsized, rear-wheel-drive hatchback or coupe with the name — but it’s possible, albeit unlikely, that it will be used for the small compact Chrysler.

The launch of the upcoming Chrysler car might be timed so that it comes close to the relaunch of the Dodge Dart. Some observers believe that the Dart will be made into more of a niche car, perhaps with the lowest performance version matching today’s Dart GT, or having a turbocharged “Hurricane” engine, while the Chrysler 100 will cater to the mainstream.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/05/chrysler-compact-still-coming-28662

Chrysler 300 Interior Bowls Over Competition

Is it any wonder American consumers ignore large cars and instead shop the abundant crop of functional, sometimes sporty CUVs?

WardsAuto’s Large Car segment is a lonely place, with only four entries, and sales through March are down 14% while the car market overall is flat, according to WardsAuto data.

Two years ago, the newest entry was the Chevrolet Impala, which is very sharp, but it didn’t win a Ward’s 10 Best Interiors trophy because the interior is less compelling than the beautifully sculpted sheet metal.

The same cannot be said of the refreshed Chrysler 300, which carries over many of the styling cues, inside and out, that have made it a perennial contender, while integrating a number of meaningful improvements.

The Chrysler 300 makes big sedans relevant once again and even tips its hat, by way of a nearly identical color scheme, to a high-end interior that dazzled us last year: the $122,895 Mercedes S-Class sedan.

The 300C Platinum rolled into our garage with a more palatable $51,175 price tag and, like the S-Class, parlays gorgeous satin metallic trim, quilted leather, excellent fit-and-finish and a first-rate human-machine interface that is easy to learn and simple to use.

With its latest Uconnect system, Fiat Chrysler makes what appears to be simple work of the HMI, which can be daunting because automakers need to incorporate so many functions within the central display screen to eliminate buttons from the instrument panel and center console.

But the 300 is much more than cool electronics. From the white-faced analog clock to the heated rear seats, the cabin is roomy, welcoming and luxurious.

“In a world overpopulated with giant SUVs, the Chrysler 300C Platinum reminds us how glorious big sedans can be,” writes WardsAuto editor Drew Winter.

“The ’15 model takes the award-winning interior of the previous version up another notch with even more features, comfort and sumptuous materials. It also has wonderfully practical details, such as stout grab handles and a truly sturdy sunglass holder,” Winter says.

For what it’s worth, Fiat Chrysler kinda owns the big-car segment. The 300’s platform mate, the refreshed Dodge Charger, is the only entry in the sector posting gains through the first three months, up 5% to 26,218 units, according to WardsAuto data.

The Charger is duking it out with the Impala for the No.1 sales slot, while deliveries of the 300 are flat. The Ford Taurus, overdue for redesign, brings up the rear; its sales are down 27.6% for the quarter.

Yes, the Charger also was in the competition this year, but we opted instead for the 300’s soothing, upscale persona.

“I could live in this car,” says one judge. And live well.

Read more at: http://wardsauto.com/vehicles-technology/chrysler-300-interior-bowls-over-competition

Renegade, 300 on Ward’s “Best Interior” list

Ward’s Auto has added the Jeep Renegade Limited to its “Ten Best Interiors List” for 2015.

The Renegade was one of two Chrysler-brand vehicles to make list: the other was the new Chrysler 300 Platinum.

Drew Winter, Editor-in-Chief of Ward’s Autoworld magazine, said:

“The interior checks off all our boxes in terms of being roomy, comfortable and having excellent ergonomics — even the voice-activation system works flawlessly. But, the attention given to interior details and design is truly spectacular for a vehicle in this class. Whimsical design elements, bold, contrasting colors and stunning metallic bronze trim convey a sense of fun and adventure that sets it apart. The Renegade isn’t a ’cute ute,’ it’s the Cherokee’s badass little brother.”

Ward’s Auto editors spent two months evaluating and judging 42 vehicles. Scoring was based on a wide variety of factors including fit-and-finish, comfort, material selection, ergonomics, information/displays, value, safety and overall design aesthetics.

At $33,205, the Renegade Limited was one of the least-expensive vehicles on the list. Only the Honda Fit EX-L had a lower sticker.

Last month, the editors of Kelley Blue Book‘s kbb.com said the Renegade was one of their “10 Favorite New-for-2015 Cars” and “10 Best All-Wheel-Drive Vehicles Under $25,000.”

Chrysler’s new top-level Platinum interior also received high praise from Winter:

“In a world overpopulated with giant SUVs, the Chrysler 300C Platinum reminds us how glorious big sedans can be. The ’15 model takes the superb interior of the previous version up another notch with even more features, comfort and sumptuous materials. The quilted leather trim and patterned upholstery are similar to what we see on German luxury sedans costing three times as much. The huge touchscreen and Uconnect infotainment system is about the best at any price. Yet it also has wonderfully practical details, such as stout grab handles and a truly sturdy sunglasses holder. ‘I could live in this car,’ says one judge. Yes indeed. And live well,”

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/04/renegade-300-on-wards-best-interior-list-28436

2015 Chrysler 300 V-8

Quick! Name an American, rear-drive, V-8–powered, full-size sedan. If you said, “Chrysler 300,” you’re only 15 percent right, because that’s the proportion of 300 buyers who actually opt for the V-8. The rest decide that the V-6 will suffice, a strong indicator that while the model name may be rooted in a high-performance heritage, the car sells mostly on its styling, size, and value. All the same, the V-8 is key to the car’s image so that’s the version we sought out first—in both the 300C and sportier 300S trims—to sample on roads in and around Austin, Texas.

A decade after Ralph Gilles’s design for the 2005 model caused an industry sensation, the 300 has been revamped a second time, with new nose and tail treatments featuring redesigned lights and a 32-percent larger grille, a fresh interior, and an eight-speed automatic operated by a rotary dial on the console. The EPA combined fuel-economy rating goes up 1 mpg to 19 (16/25 mpg city/highway) with the new transmission, the quicker shifting of which Chrysler says will also improve performance even though the engine is unchanged.

The 300 got a thorough redo in 2011, but for 2015 it gets no new sheetmetal, unlike its platform-mate, the Dodge Charger. It does add another trim level, the 300C Platinum. The C, S, and C Platinum all offer the V-8 as an option but the engine is not available on the base Limited, adding a perhaps-unintended layer of meaning to that version’s name.

Checking the option box for the 5.7-liter V-8 costs $3000, which gets you not only the 363-hp Hemi, but also bigger brakes (with dual- rather than single-piston calipers up front and ventilated rather than solid rotors in back) and a 160-mph speedometer. The 300S also gains a decklid spoiler, while C and Platinum trim levels get the paddle shifters that come standard on any S. This year, the V-8 can no longer be paired with all-wheel drive, owing to that combo’s abysmal take rate; evidently, people who already commit $2500 extra for AWD are disinclined to throw another three grand at the lump under the hood.

DIAL A GEAR

Brand president and CEO Al Gardner’s marching orders for Chrysler are to square up more directly against the industry’s volume-sales leaders, including Ford, Chevrolet, and Toyota. As Chrysler’s flagship, the 300 still has some near-luxury pretensions, but the sharpened focus gives Dodge precedence as the “performance” brand. This goes some way toward explaining the lack of a U.S.-market SRT8 version. The SRT8 will survive in some foreign markets, but its price point exceeds (and its sales volumes fall far short of) Chrysler’s targets for North America.

A pity perhaps, but mainstream buyers in search of a V-8’s bellowing torque still have the 5.7-liter and its 394 lb-ft to lust after. New mechanical elements are the eight-speed gearbox, electric-assist power steering, and a retuned suspension using aluminum components. Aside from the rotary-dial gear selector much like the one on the Chrysler 200, prominent changes inside include a handsome new steering wheel, a new instrument cluster, and a redesigned center stack. There’s a good division of labor between the 8.4-inch UConnect touch screen and the button interfaces, although we grew frustrated by a radio we couldn’t turn off—the volume can be muted, but it repeatedly reactivated itself without our bidding. Also, the heated-seat controls are buried in the touch-screen menu rather than given dedicated buttons; partially offsetting that annoyance, a seat-heat icon appears on-screen when you first start the car, so you can avoid the irritation if you’re quick.

Supplementing that screen is a new 7.0-inch driver-information display nestled between the tach and speedometer. As long as you’re okay with the dial-a-gear setup, the controls are all easier to figure out and use than in the previous model, even with the added indicators and buttons for the new electronic driver aids, which include adaptive cruise control with full-stop ability, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist, forward-collision warning, and brake assist. These are contained in the SafetyTec 2 package, a $1695 option; SafetyTec 1, also at $1695 and required to get SafetyTec 2, brings parking assist, blind-spot and cross-traffic alerts, as well as forward-collision and adaptive cruise.

WHERE THE HEMI MEETS THE ROAD

The first V-8 we drove was a 300C optioned up to $47,170 with all the electronic assists, Touring suspension, and 20-inch wheels wearing 245/45 all-season performance tires. It’s a handsome car in the more traditional Detroit mold with plenty of chrome trim and, as configured, most of the driver-oriented hardware that comes on a 300S, excluding only that version’s tauter suspension. The 300C proved to be a comfortable, relaxed commuter through Austin’s dense urban traffic despite a bit of road noise from the performance-grade rubber; standard 18-inch wheels with touring-grade tires are a better choice for the comfort-seeker.

Once we got out into Texas Hill Country and the winding two-lane roads that make the region a driver’s delight, the latest 300 was eager to demonstrate that, like its predecessors, it can handle much better than you’d ever expect of a 4350-pound four-door. To get the best out of it, turn the gear selector to “S,” which delivers crisper shifts and allows the driver to take full control of the eight gears via the paddles—it lets you bump against the rev limiter rather than shifting itself at redline.

Our complaints of lazy shifting in previous 300s have been addressed, especially with the dial in S. Whether the driver calls for them or lets the transmission think for itself, gearchanges are crisp, taking only 250 microseconds, according to Chrysler, versus 400 for the previous model with its five-speed automatic. The only flaw is that Chrysler’s paddles are small, sharing back-of-the-wheel space with audio-system buttons, making it too easy to change radio stations rather than gears. There’s also a Sport button on the center stack that calls up more-aggressive programs for the throttle and steering response.

Speaking of the latter, Chrysler seems to have done its sums right with the electric-assist steering. You wouldn’t call it communicative, but at its worst the feel is as good as that delivered by the previous hydraulic unit, and sometimes it’s better as full electronic control allows for sharper reflexes when you’re going hard without imposing any burden in parking maneuvers. It’s also adjustable through three settings via the center screen.

PLENTY OF GOODS TO BACK UP THE GOODNESS

While the Platinum layers on more luxury, the driver’s choice remains the 300S with the V-8. Our test example had the 300S Premium Group option pack ($3295), including a dual-pane panoramic sunroof, navigation, the big UConnect screen, the SafetyTec 1 features, satellite radio, and so on. Other notable options included a $895 Light Group with self-leveling HID headlamps, SafetyTec 2, and a roof painted black to contrast with the Redline red paint ($1500). Not all of that is essential gear, so it’s clear you can get the driving goodness of the 300S without spending the full $46,275 on this car’s sticker. That’s worth considering because at that price, you’re head-to-head with the Chevrolet SS, which comes fully loaded at its base price and now offers your choice of manual or automatic transmission. Also important, the Chevy is several hundred pounds lighter and a better performer overall.

The Chevy might not interest those into the 300 look and the Hemi heritage, but the keen drivers for whom that car might be an option should know that the tighter suspension in the 300S is worth having—with it, the car took a quicker set into a corner and was less inclined to pitch or roll than was the otherwise similar 300C when the back roads took on the contours of a stormy sea. The 300S’s attendant blacked-out trim and unique grille texture are more matters of taste.

Chrysler kept reminding us that the 300 model name turns 60 years old in 2015, harking back to the original C-300 of 1955. Sixty years ago, its 300 (gross) horsepower was a bunch of power and the C-300 was a bunch of car. It was also an early exemplar of a car company mating luxury and style with performance.

Even with the SRT8 version gone, the 2015 model combines respectable performance, elegant styling, useful technology, and surprising agility at a reasonable price. If it’s the V-8 configuration you want, this may be the time to step up. When FCA finally gets around to a clean-sheet redesign—expected for 2018—the V-8 will probably be even more rare, and more expensive, than it is now.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-chrysler-300-v-8-first-drive-review

2015 Chrysler 300C revealed

Chrysler has revealed the 2015 300, 300S, and 300C, the company’s flagship cars (even if their prices are equalled by their own minivans).

300c 2015
All 300s get an eight-speed automatic, but none get the 6.4 liter engine used in the past 300C SRT, unless a future un-announced model will have it. All wheel drive is restricted to the V6 cars.

The cars continue into 2015 with relatively minor cosmetic changes: the front is more curvaceous, the side line emphasized a little, the grilles updated, a 200-like lower grille added, and the tail-lights simplified. Inside, the same basic forms continue, but with noticeably different styling.

For many more photos, including interior and exterior shots, along with pricing and other information, see our 2015 Chrysler 300 – 300C – 300S page.

As read on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2014/11/2015-chrysler-300c-revealed-2

2013 Chrysler 300 | When Good Ideas Converge

The success of a small business owner depends in no small amount on how he or she can reconcile ideas which are commonly thought to be polar opposites.

For example, in order to lead well, one must have 100% confidence in oneself as a leader. Then again, one must also lead with humility, being on the lookout constantly for ways to improve and knowing full well that there is always more to learn.

In this case, balancing two seemingly opposed ideas—confidence and humility—produces a well-rounded leader, which in turn can produce a smooth-running business. When it comes to vehicles, balancing a series of seemingly opposed ideas—power and efficiency, affordability and luxury, to name just a few—can produce a car well-suited for just about any business. That car is the Chrysler 300.

Power/Efficiency

The 3.6-liter Pentastar® V-6 engine with eight-speed automatic transmission produces up to 300 horsepower at little cost to overall efficiency. With an EPA-estimated 19 city/31 highway mpg, the Chrysler 300 rivals many midsized sedans, including the 2013 Chrysler 200, no slouch itself when it comes to mpg.

For more power, owners can step up to a 5.7-liter HEMI® V-8 engine that delivers a respectable efficiency (25 mpg highway) despite also delivering a road-gripping 363 horsepower. This is thanks in large part to the HEMI engine’s Fuel Saver Technology, which optimizes fuel efficiency when V-8 power is not required.

Luxury/Affordability

Every detail in the Chrysler 300 is designed with refinement in mind. While the advanced acoustic properties reduce outside noise and increase interior peace, premium finishes and soft-touch materials lend depth to surfaces found throughout the cabin, creating a complete picture of luxury, but not one that will break the bank.

Business owners interested in pricing out the Chrysler 300 will find the MSRP compares favorably to similar vehicles in its class, especially when one considers the vehicle’s quality and quantity of features that come standard with purchase.

As read on: http://blog.chryslercommercialvehicles.com/2013/07/30/2013-chrysler-300-when-good-ideas-converge/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_campaign=CSJul3113Facebook3&ism=CSJul3113Facebook3

Top 10 things you need to know about the 2012 Chrysler 300 SRT8:

  1. It really is capable of being the bargain version of the Mercedes-Benz E63 AMG.
  2. Power for the Chrysler 300 SRT8 comes from a  6.4 liter HEMI V8 making 470-hp with a maximum torque of 470 lb-ft – an increase of 45 horsepower and 50 lb-ft over the 6.1 liter HEMI V8 it replaces.
  3. The engine is mated to a 5-speed automatic transmission with steering wheel mounted paddle shifters and a rear-wheel-drive or AWD system.
  4. 0 to 60 mph in the high 4-second range; the quarter mile comes high 12-second range; 0-100-0 mph in less than 16 seconds – and a top speed of 175 mph.
  5. Stopping power comes from 14.2 inch (front) and 13.8 inch (rear) vented/slotted rotors with four-piston Brembo calipers painted in silver finish.
  6. A full-color graphic EVIC (Electronic Vehicle Information Center), allows you to keep track of how the car is performing while you drive. Shown on the 8.4-inch instrument touchscreen panel you can store your 0-60, one-eighth mile and quarter-mile times, your 60-0 braking distance, and your g-force distribution.
  7. It features a new adaptive damping suspension (ADS) system that allows you to pick from Auto and Sport mode. In Sport mode, the Chrysler 300 SRT8, the damping system rebound and compression is locked to the higher damping rate
  8. Owners of any Chrysler Group SRT vehicle will get a one day of professional driving instruction from the Richard Petty Driving Experience as part of the SRT Track Experience.
  9. Fuel-economy for the 300 SRT8 comes in at 14/23 mpg (city/highway) or 17 mpg combined. Annual fuel-cost is estimated at $3,203 if you drive 15,000 miles a year (based on 45% highway, 55% city driving)
  10. Prices start at $47,995. Comparatively, a BMW 528i with a 240-hp 4-cylinder turbo starts at $46,700, a Mercedes-Benz E350 starts at $50,490 and the Audi A6 3.0 TFSI starts at $49,900.

As read on: http://www.egmcartech.com/2011/12/06/top-10-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-2012-chrysler-300-srt8/