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2015 Nissan Versa Note SR – Driven

When Nissan brought me its cheapest hatchback, the 2014 Versa Note, earlier this year I found myself impressed with its nimbleness, abundant interior space great features despite its bargain price. I did wish it was a little faster, and the CVT isn’t the best, but in general I recommended it as a great bargain runabout. For 2015, Nissan has the new sportier looking Versa Note SR, and the automaker sent it my way for a week of testing (read: flogging). The new car has revised visual cues inside and out, and the equipment list is a little different than my last Versa. Best yet, it’s even a little cheaper than the last one I tested as well.

Does the new looks and revised interior make this car even better than the old model? Does the lowered price and reduced equipment options make it a better deal or a drearier place to spend time? Did that CVT magically get any better?

Exterior

The 2014 Versa Note wasn’t attractive in the general sense, but it did at least look interesting. The soft curves and sculpted shapes made it look far more handsome than a tall hatch with flat-sides should be allowed. With the new SR, Nissan Nissan added a lot of small changes to the outside that combine to make a huge difference. The grille is a dark diamond mesh pattern that looks a lot classier than the long horizontal stripes of my last tester, and the headlamps have been modified ever so slightly. The outside amber reflector on the headlamp has been moved down and widened slightly. It is a tiny change, but it more closely follows the angles and lines of the car to make the front end look a little more aggressive.

The SR features a whole new front bumper that sees the flat and boring horizontal body line shaped into a “vee” that mirrors the angles of the upper grille. The lower grill has a more three-dimensional look with a new front lip and lateral cuts that frame the revised fog light housings. There is more black diamond mesh in the lower grille, and the fog lights now have black surrounds with sharp chrome trim highlighting the top and outer edges.

Down the side of the Versa you can see the new side-view mirrors that are one of my favorite changes to the exterior. The old models were large and bulbous round units, but the 2015 SR arrives with squared units that look more aerodynamic and interesting. There is a large and thin LED strake that runs through the front of the top-third of the mirror to act as an indicator light and it really shows of the new sculpting and shape of the mirror housing. To match the new nose there is also an aggressive side skirt that runs the profile of the Versa SR. The alloy wheels of the SR are also new with an exclusive and stunning two-tone silver and black color scheme coupled to a split-spoke design. They are 16 inches in diameter, same as the last model.

The tail of the Versa Note SR gets the same level of attention that the rest of the exterior does. The new rear bumper is wider at the bottom, giving the car a more square and planted visual stance, and there is a plethora of new cuts, sculpting details and trim changes. The bottom of the bumper tucks up into a visual representation of a diffuser that is made from a carbon-look plastic of surprising quality. TO the outer edges of that trim, there are sculpted cuts that mirror the new shape of the fog light housings in the nose. To finish the new go-faster styling, there is a spoiler mounted to the top of the hatch. It’s not as large as the one you will find on the Fiesta ST, but its dual hump design is attractive.

Interior

The inside of the Versa range has always been its strongest selling point. It may be a hatch, but the Versa Note is designed to provide passenger space and comfort more than cargo room. While it didn’t get any more space for 2015, the SR trim does add some cool visual upgrades, as well as some improved trim and ergonomics.

The seats of the SR are built to match the sporty exterior and feature a cloth that is similar to suede in the way it feels. It is much stickier than the standard cloth and does a pretty good job of trying to hold you in the seats. It also just plain feels nicer. Along with the new cloth material, the seats of the SR get a new design that features a cool orange stripe and orange dimpled inserts. Even on a car wearing Metallic Blue paint like mine, the orange just seems to work. The seats are also held together with orange contrast stitching, and you will find the same dimpled cloth on the doors.

Front and center there is an SR-special leather-wrapped steering wheel. Directly behind that is what Nissan calls Fine Vision Vision gauges and they are gorgeous in all the right ways. The cluster is filled with three large black circles, and they are backlit by brilliant white light. Even in direct bright sunlight all the gauges are incredible crisp and clear. Despite this, they are not glaringly bright at night. Regardless of conditions or light, they just always seem to be at the perfect brightness. If Nissan told me these gauges were powered by unicorn magic I would believe them.

In the center of the speedo there is a small LCD that seems to float in a bowl black inky nothingness. It serves multiple functions that you can scroll through with a single button mounted to the steering wheel that include mpg measurements, remaining range and more. To the right is a more traditional LCD display that notifies you of selected gear, outside temp and odometer readings.

The center stack should look much nicer and classier to anyone who owns a current Versa Note. The black plastic from the old car has been banished and replaced by glossy piano-black trim. The stereo in our car doesn’t have the Navigation system and tech package upgrades, so it lacks some of the buttons and features of my old tester, but it does have nice orange light rings around the main control knobs; a feature the old car lacked. There is also a dedicated display button that allows you to turn the screen off with the push of a single button. When going on long night trips, being able to quickly deactivate the bright screen is a welcome touch.

Move a little south from the stereo unit and you are greeted by revised climate controls. The cheap and chunky gray plastic knobs have been ditched for black units, and the fan control knob now has a nice chrome trim ring. The large circular cut in the plastic to make room for these controls is also gone, and it makes the center stack look much nicer and higher quality. Again, these are all subtle touches, but together they add up to make the cabin a much nicer place to be.

Drivetrain

While the 2015 Versa Note SR got a whole pile of visual goodies added to its repertoire, the greasy bits that keep it moving haven’t changed at all. That means you still get a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder engine with 109 horsepower and 107 pound-feet of torque. Despite its sporting disposition and looks, the SR is still only sold with Nissan’s Xtronic CVT. If you want to row your own gears in the Versa you are stuck with the base S model.

Performance is only adequate with the 0-to-60-mph sprint coming around in the high nine-second range, and while I didn’t test it, I wouldn’t expect the Versa to manage more than 125 mph on the top end. Since the running gear hasn’t changed, the fuel economy ratings haven’t either. The sticker still proudly claims 40 mpg on the highway with 31 in the city and a combined rating overall of 35.

With my last Versa I only managed to clear about 30 mpg which was more than disappointing. I am not 100-percent sure of what has changed between now and then, but I managed a healthy 36-plus mpg on this go around with the Versa Note, despite the fact that I pushed this model even harder than I did the last one. The CVT even seemed to behave better for me this go around when I was traversing the rapid elevation changes in the area. Nissan hasn’t said anything about changing the tuning of the CVT for the SR, so I am not entirely sure what prompted such an improvement in fuel economy or driveability.

Price

The SR sits in the middle of the Versa lineup between the value priced SV and the top-trim SL. The lowest price you can pay for a Versa Note SR is $17,530, but with some options you can push that higher. Our car came with the SR Convenience Package that added the 5-inch display in the dash, SiriusXM satellite radio and backup camera all for the sum of $660. Add in $180 for the carpeted floor and cargo mats, plus the $810 destination fee, to brings the grand total up to $19,180.

That is almost $500 cheaper than the last Versa I drove, but that $500 secured Navigation, a trick AroundView monitor setup and keyless entry with a push-button start. The body kit and revised interior trim is nice, but I expected the SR to be just a touch cheaper, or maybe a tad better equipped.

Driving Impressions

Driving the 2015 Versa Note SR, unsurprisingly, was just like driving the 2015 model. That isn’t a bad thing though. The car isn’t equipped with a set of race-spec coilovers, but its lower ride height and stretched wheelbase do create a platform that is more fun than you would likely give it credit for. There is a fair bit of body roll, but once the weight transitions, the car will stick and sling your through a corner. If you are good with some late left-foot braking you can even get the tail to step just slightly.

Understeer can be an issue at the absolute limit but during normal brisk driving, it isn’t a problem in most situations. The engine is small, and mounted fairly far back in the nose between the wheels so the amount of weight on the nose is reduced, thereby reducing its tendency to understeer you straight into a tree around that one banked hairpin you love so much.

When you aren’t trying to set a new back-road record, the Versa Note SR settles into a competent commuter machine. NVH inside the cabin is more hushed than you would expect from a car in this price range and the seats are plenty supportive for longer drives. The stereo is not the greatest-sounding thing in the world, but it serves its purpose well and smartly placed controls make it easy to operate when on the move without taking your eyes off the road. Nissan was even kind enough to include a text-messaging assistant that is designed to read incoming texts aloud to help curb the pandemic problem of texting while driving.

When driving around in tighter urban areas, the large windows, upright seating position and tight turning circle are huge bonuses. The steering is also better in the city than out on the great wilds of rural America with its quick action and light weighting…

Conclusion

The Nissan Versa SR builds on the already great new Versa with revised designs inside and out that add up to make the car look faster, classier and more expensive. Despite the new looks, price has stayed the same, and that is great for potential buyers. I wish that Nissan would have added just a touch more power to match the more aggressive looks. Still the Versa Note SR still offers a great option for buyers looking to get lots of space and practicality in a smaller size with a cheaper price tag.

Read the full article on: http://www.topspeed.com/cars/nissan/2015-nissan-versa-note-srdriven-ar166668.html#main

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2015 Nissan Juke

I didn’t always like the Nissan Juke. When it launched in 2010, I just couldn’t get over the way it looked – it came across as super weird, and kind of hideous at first blush. But I slowly warmed up to the funky little crossover/hatchback/thing, and after spending some time behind the wheel, I really learned to love Nissan’s small wonder. It’s a genuine hoot to drive, offering hot hatch-like thrills in a package that doesn’t look like anything else on the road. The Nismo and RS models that followed only increased my ardor for the turbocharged Juke, and now, I find myself smiling whenever I see one of these little guys bombing down the road.

Going into 2015, Nissan hasn’t really made major changes, but there are a host of smaller improvements on hand to make it a more well-rounded vehicle than ever before. And to up the funk factor for the new year, there are a slew of customization options now available to customers through the Juke Color Studio – for better or worse

Following my first drive of the third-generation Nissan Murano in Napa Valley, I took the refreshed Juke for a spin to see if the 2015 model year improvements still make for a car that’s good to drive and easy to use, while bursting with the same personality that slowly won me over in the first place.

Drive Notes
– Powering the Juke is the same turbocharged, 1.6-liter inline-four as last year, with 188 horsepower and 177 pound-feet of torque on tap. I’ve always liked this engine – it’s punchy and feels good when being worked via the 2014 model’s six-speed manual transmission. There’s lots of power down low, with a nice bit of boost mid-range through each gear. Altering the drive modes between Normal and Sport heighten this, and honestly, the turbo/manual setup in this front-wheel-drive Juke was kind of hilarious – a real treat.

– Sadly, Nissan will no longer offer the manual transmission on non-Nismo Juke models for 2015, so you’re stuck with the continuously variable transmission. Bummer. In sport mode, the usually good Xtronic CVT tends to rev high and hold itself there – a tendency of older such transmissions that’s seriously off-putting, especially for enthusiasts.

– Still, the Juke is available with a choice of either front- or all-wheel drive. The FWD Juke is fun, offering decent amounts of grip with a hint of predictable understeer. But I’ve always liked the four-season factor of the AWD Juke. I’ve never driven the high-riding hatch in the snow, but I imagine with the proper tires, this thing would be excellent.

– The rest of the driving aspects haven’t changed since the last time I left the Juke. The steering is nicely weighted and direct, the brakes feel a little mushy on first application but offer plenty of pedal feel after that, and the whole thing blasts down the road with a sort of fun that not many other small crossovers can match.

– What has changed about the Juke for 2015 is its styling, though I won’t fault you for not being able to immediately spot the differences. Up front, the already busy schnoz has been slightly redesigned, with reshaped turn signals (the top tier of lights), and new projector-beam headlamps worked into their middle-tier housings. The side indicators have moved to the mirrors, where they have an angular shape to mimic the lamps out front and the swoopy taillamps around back. And finally, some new colors are available, including the Solar Yellow you see here, not to mention all of the odd choices on tap in the aforementioned Color Studio.

– Inside, it’s more of the same – no big change here, aside from the addition of some NissanConnect tech and the inclusion of the company’s excellent Around View Monitor. Cloth and leather seating surfaces are available, with glossy silver or red trim on the doors and transmission tunnel. (Side note: the red gloss on this test car matched with the yellow exterior paint created a sort of ketchup and mustard theme that I wouldn’t recommend unless you’re a hot dog enthusiast.)

Nissan’s pricing for the 2015 Juke remains competitive, with the front-wheel-drive S starting at $20,250, not including $825 for destination. This represents an increase of $1,080 versus the 2014 model (the destination charge has increased by $15, too), but Nissan points out that the ’15 Juke comes standard with a lot more kit, including a backup camera, Intelligent Key with pushbutton start, Bluetooth and more. Given its tiny size, the Juke has never felt inexpensive, but the price increase for such popular equipment seems fair to me, and with the new customization options on deck for 2015, it feels like Nissan’s funky hatch is getting even more so – and judging by the model’s continued strong sales, that’s no bad thing.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2014/12/10/2015-nissan-juke-quick-spin-review/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

Can You Really Drive a Nissan GT-R Every Day?

That’s the million – err, $100,000 question isn’t it? Can you really drive a Nissan GT-R every day? You know, to the grocery store, to pick up the kids from school, to grab a burrito? I wanted to find out, so Nissan gave me a brand-new, 2015 GT-R to drive around every day for a week.

With any GT-R, the initial impression is pretty clear — it’s big, it’s comfortable, and it will give you neck problems if you push on the gas hard enough. The thing is blisteringly fast from a standstill. Even at higher speeds, the 3.8-liter V6 pushes it more than I was even willing to.

But forget that impressive power. Forget the 0-60 time. Forget the torque meter and the lap timer. Is the Nissan GT-R really an “everyday supercar” as most people claim? I wanted to find out for myself.

Acquiring Socks

I had to go buy socks. Normally that’s a pretty easy thing to do. Go to the store. Park as close as possible. Acquire socks. Exit quickly. But I’m driving a $100,000 supercar. That means I had to park pretty darn far for these socks.

It’s not so much that the GT-R won’t fit in normal parking spots, or navigate through parking lots. Even when parked out of every possible human being’s way you still expect to walk out and see a giant scratch or dent. Or some a-hole leaning up against it taking pictures. So much anxiety.

And then the gym. I watched it through the window in-between sets.

Mission: Fast Food

Americans love getting fast food. So for the sake of science, I planned to make a quick drive-thru run in the Nissan. But as I pulled up to the entrance, those daunting curbs, that sharp corner, that tall window; I gave up. I went to Chipotle down the street instead.

I felt ashamed. Mostly because of the idea of fast food, but also because I didn’t have enough confidence in myself to make it into that tight space. I just didn’t want to risk a scratch or ding to the rim. Mission: Failed.

To the Park

My initial plan was to get my 17-pound shitzu, and strap her in the passenger seat. Then I remembered that I don’t want Nissan to hate me, so I didn’t do that. Instead, I drove the park sans shitzu to meditate on the spirit of the GT-R/play on the playground. It was quite lovely, actually.

Lo and behold, the GT-R doesn’t have a problem parking in some grassy areas. Again, as long as your park it as far away as humanly possible. I didn’t hoon it, Nissan, I promise.

Junk in the Trunk

The GT-R is a big car, which is sort of weird when you look at the rest of Japanese car culture. It’s got American-sized, comfy leather seats, a back seat fit for amputees, and a ginormous trunk. Ginormagantuan.

I managed to fit a fold up tent, a fold up chair, and a pack of beer in the back with some room to spare. I mean, it took some finagling, but they all fit pretty snuggly. Not bad considering most other supercars in this price range don’t have that much room to boot.

Tongue-in-cheek review aside, I sincerely think you can drive a Nissan GT-R every day. To an extent. Unlike Jalopnik’s Doug DeMuro – who did a similar review with his Ferrari 360 – the GT-R is actually a more practical choice, for about the same price. Go figure. It drives easy, it gets decent enough mpg (16 city/23 highway), and if you take some Xanax you should be fine with leaving it out in public. Just make sure to take her out to her natural habitat – a track – every once in a while.

8/10, would drive every day again.

As read on: http://news.boldride.com/2014/11/nissan-gt-r-review/63113/

2015 Nissan Versa Note is smartly packaged hatchback

The 2015 Nissan Versa Note five-door hatchback is one of the lowest-priced new cars in the U.S. market and is affordable at the gas pump, too.

Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including destination charge, for a base, front-wheel drive, 2015 Versa Note with five-speed manual transmission: just $14,990. This makes it one of the lowest-priced new cars in the U.S. market.

A 2015 Versa Note with continuously variable transmission (CVT) that a driver operates like an automatic is $16,240. But even at that price, you could buy two Versa Notes for the price of an average new vehicle these days.

Gasoline mileage is another reward for budget-conscious shoppers. The top federal government fuel economy ratings for the 2015 Versa Note are a noteworthy 31 miles per gallon in city driving and 40 mpg on the highway, for an average of 35 mpg — the third-best figures for any non-hybrid and non-electric hatchback.

This is for the 2015 Versa Note with CVT and standard, active grille shutters that improve aerodynamics by automatically closing off some grille openings once the car is moving at more than 20 miles per hour.

In fact, filling the car’s 10.8-gallon tank costs only $37 at today’s prices, and a full tank can take you an estimated 378 miles.

And this is no cramped compact. The extremely roomy back seat’ can easily accommodate adults. Indeed, the 38.3 inches and 38 inches of back-seat legroom and headroom, respectively, in the compact Versa Note are more than that of the back seat of the larger, 2015 Chevrolet Malibu sedan.

Competitors to the Versa Note include low-priced, five-door hatchbacks such as the 2015 Honda Fit, which starts at $16,315 with six-speed manual and $17,115 with CVT. There’s also the 2015 Kia Rio 5-Door with a starting MSRP, including destination charge of $14,790 with five-speed manual and $17,900 with automatic transmission.

Don’t confuse the Versa Note with the plainer-looking Nissan Versa sedan that has a starting retail price of $12,800. The Versa Note’s tall hatchback body style is more attractive and makes for more practical interior space. But the 15-inch base wheels look small on the 5-foot-tall Versa Note.

Not much has changed for the 2015 model year, which is only the model’s second year.

Bluetooth hands-free phone connectivity is now a standard feature on all models, and there are two new trim levels — SR and SV — that have more features.

The test car was an SR, which included stylish, suede seats, rear spoiler, fog lamps, sport grille and front and rear fascias, rearview camera and 16-inch, alloy wheels. Yet despite the sporty add-ons, the SR had the fuel-saving CVT and the same, 109-horsepower four cylinder that’s in all Versa Notes.

Acceleration was not quick, but it was steady and was accompanied by droning sounds from the CVT. Drivers who are accustomed to regular automatics, which have defined shift points that drop the engine revs, will wait and wait for the Versa Note’s high rev sounds to die down.

Torque from the Versa Note’s 1.6-liter, double overhead cam four cylinder peaks at a meager 109 foot-pounds at 4,400 rpm. This is less than the 114 foot-pounds of torque at 4,600 rpm that the 130-horsepower four cylinder in the Honda Fit generates. It’s also less than the 123 foot-pounds at 4,850 rpm that the Kia Rio’s 138-horsepower, 1.6-liter four cylinder generates.

The power difference — and the Versa Note’s light weight of just 2,414 pounds to 2,543 pounds — pays off in fuel mileage.

The test Versa Note SR averaged nearly 32 mpg in driving that was a majority city travel, and that was without the driver trying to maximize fuel economy.

Seats are perched a good bit from the car floor. But cushioning felt cheap and could be improved.

Front-seat passengers have good views out. There are good driver views out, too, while making right-hand turns, thanks to a small triangular window that’s built into the base of each windshield pillar — a feature not found in some other cars with upright body styles and thick window pillars.

The Versa Note SR, riding on 16-inch, rather than 15-inch, all-season tires, communicated a good amount of road noise to the passenger cabin, partly because all Versa Note tires are the low rolling resistance kind that are designed to maximize fuel economy.

The car was a nimble handler and easy to maneuver and park, especially in tight parking garages.

And with a car this inexpensive and devoid of flash, a driver doesn’t worry much about leaving it parked on a street, either.

The liftgate at the back opens wide, and a low floor in the Versa Note makes loading easier than in some car trunks.

Total cargo room behind the rear seats is greater than in many car trunks — 18.8 cubic feet. Cargo space expands to 38.3 cubic feet when back seats are folded down.

There is a lot of hard, utilitarian plastic inside the Versa Note on the dashboard and interior doors. It’s not rich-looking.

The 2015 Versa Note earned four out of five stars in federal government crash tests. The car did best in side crash testing, where it garnered a full five stars. The overall average was pulled down, however, by frontal crash testing that rated only three out of five stars for passenger protection.

As read on: http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/273759501.html

2015 Nissan Juke Press Release

GENEVA, Switzerland – When it arrived a little more than three years ago, the Nissan JUKE used innovation to create a whole new market segment. Just as the Nissan Qashqai pioneered the original crossover market, the JUKE used dramatic design and advanced technology to break new ground in a more compact crossover package.

The JUKE’s combination of highly individual styling, strong driving dynamics and sophisticated interior equipment has allowed it storm from zero to 420,000 sales in less than 40 months, easily eclipsing its rivals.

Now, following Nissan’s established practice of constant development comes the next chapter in the JUKE story. Establishing itself as the original stand-out model in the growing small crossover market with premium style and refinement, the new JUKE is ready to once again stamp its authority on the segment it created.

Already recognized as the design trend-setter, the new JUKE benefits from a series of design enhancements, new engines, new equipment and a wide-ranging personalization program.

Among the changes are a new design at the front and rear with greater emphasis on both premium refinement and sporty design cues; a new downsized 1.2-liter turbocharged engine offering greater performance, economy and lower emissions; a revised 1.6-liter DIG-T engine; improved four-wheel drive with Torque Vectoring System; new alloy wheels; advanced equipment including a new audio system, the latest generation NissanConnect driver-vehicle interface, Nissan Safety Shield, Nissan’s Dynamic Control system, plus the option of a new opening glass roof.

Revisions in the luggage area have increased space by 40 percent in two-wheel drive versions up to 354L, while there’s even greater opportunity for owners to really stamp their own personality on their JUKE. A range of new colors and interior themes are available with a number of different personalization packs.

The changes and range additions will accelerate the growth of Nissan’s second most popular model in Europe, helping it to emulate the remarkable achievements of its big brother Qashqai.

JUKE is the best seller in the premium B-segment, outperforming all direct competitors including those from the top German brands. And it’s not just the entry-level models which have helped JUKE to the top: the best selling engine to date has been the 1.6-liter petrol unit while the top Tekna grade accounts for more than one third of all sales.

But the big NISMO news is the advanced preview of the extreme new JUKE NISMO RS, a totally focused model with more power (218PS/160kW), upgraded brakes, a stiffer body and a limited slip differential on two wheel drive versions.

Buyers have also been attracted by a strong range of special versions – notably the Shiro and the advanced n-tec models – and the Kuro and Ministry of Sound limited editions, while the sports oriented NISMO has added driving thrills as well as breadth to the range.

On its way to a total of 420,000 sales, JUKE has achieved 135,000 sales in 2013 with its popular set to increase with the introduction of the new version. All JUKE models sold in Europe are built in Europe, at Nissan’s highly productive plant in Sunderland, UK where three shifts per day are needed to cope with demand.

Significantly for Nissan, JUKE has attracted a huge number of buyers new to the brand. As much as 85 per cent of sales have been to first-time Nissan owners, not only making it the highest conquest model in the Nissan range but a model that comfortably outperforms the B-segment average with many of those new buyers downsizing from larger cars.

“We stunned the industry with Qashqai, the original crossover, and we’ve done it again with JUKE. If anything, JUKE is even more daring and different than Qashqai and appeals to a younger, more out-going audience.

“The changes we have made to new JUKE will extend that appeal even further to cement Nissan’s position as the leading brand in the crossover market,” said Guillaume Cartier, senior vice president, Sales and Marketing for Nissan in Europe.

New JUKE will go on sale across Europe in the summer, 2014.

The changes in detail:

Exterior

Bold design has always set the JUKE apart from any rival, offering a mixture of crossover toughness with sporting appeal that has seen it become a design icon.

To radically alter the proportions would undermine the JUKE’s unmistakable presence, but designers have still managed to make significant changes to the car’s styling.

At the front, the upper lamps have been redesigned and now incorporate bi-intensity LED daytime running lamps while the headlamps now have Xenon bulbs for better visibility and new lens covers. The grille incorporates the new Nissan brand signature while the front has been toughened with new and more robust trim beneath the bumper.

Door mirrors have been revised to include LED side turn strip repeaters and, where fitted, cameras for the Around View Monitor.

At the rear the bumper has a more aggressive shape to match new revised boomerang tail lamps with LED light guide technology, giving the new JUKE a more distinctive appearance at night.

The new color palette now extends to ten colors and includes three new shades: Sunlight Yellow metallic, Ink Blue metallic and solid Red.

A new range of wheels completes the exterior revisions, with 16-inch steel and alloys available on entry-level Visia models and different styles of 17-inch alloys on Acenta and Tekna variants. A new 18-inch alloy wheel will also be available with colored inserts available allowing drivers to add their personal touch.

In addition, the extensive new personalization packs include the opportunity to add drama with brightly colored inserts, which completely change the look and feel of the wheels. Different packs also allow contrasting colors to be applied to the mirror caps, side sills, roof spoiler and door handles.

Interior personalization

In the same way that the exterior styling differentiates JUKE from anything else on the road, so the interior has a number of distinctive features, including the center console inspired by a motorbike. And again, changing these features for the sake of it would be counter-productive.

Instead Nissan designers have found ways to make the interior even bolder and more dynamic with different interior themes. In standard cars, the interior theme is a sophisticated grey, giving a technical feel to the car. Add one of the interior personalization packs and features such as the center console, door trims and other elements can be colored red, white, black or even a bright yellow.

Depending on the model, there are two styles of fabric for the seat upholstery – comfort and sport – with leather trim on top versions.

Practicality

Changes have also been made to the shape of the trunk area in two-wheel drive models to boost luggage space by an impressive 40 percent, taking the overall capacity to a class-leading 354 liters ­­- unlike rivals, JUKE can carry a large and a medium suitcase at the same time, and is also deep and wide enough to carry a chassis-type pushchair.

Versatility is further enhanced with flat folding rear seat, making it easier to load large objects, while the inclusion of a two-stage floor in the luggage area makes the space even more flexible.

Equipment

Standard equipment on all models includes LED daytime running lamps, CD radio with an AUX-In socket, gear shift indicator to promote a more efficient driving style and tire pressure monitor. The Visia 1.5 dCi and 1.6 Pack versions add alloy wheels, manual air conditioning, drive computer and driver seat height adjustment.

Acenta models are enhanced with front fog lights, 17-inch alloy wheels, automatic air conditioning, remote audio controls, Bluetooth connectivity for phone and audio streaming, cruise control and limiter, Nissan Dynamic Control System and chrome interior touches.

Enhances for the new JUKE, Nissan Dynamic Control is an advanced driver control system giving the choice of three different driving modes – Normal, Sport or Eco ­- along with instant driving information and vehicle setting controls.

Tekna models add power folding door mirrors, light and rain sensors, i-Key with Start/Stop and the latest NissanConnect with rear-view parking/reversing camera, Around View Monitor and Safety Shield.

NissanConnect now offers smartphone connectivity with access to a variety of apps ranging from social media platforms to entertainment including Internet radio through a large, 5.8-inch color touch screen. The latest generation satellite navigation system integrates with Google® to reveal a host of useful information from weather forecasts to the location of fuel stations, hotels, restaurants and many other points of interest.

A send-to-car function also allows drivers to search for their destination at home and send destination instructions to NissanConnect system at the click of a button. The system includes Bluetooth audio streaming and mobile phone integration as well as Aux-in and USB slots.

When not in infotainment mode, the screen doubles as a monitor for the newest version of Nissan’s pioneering Around View Monitor which gives a complete real-time 360 degree ‘helicopter’ view around the car to make maneuvering as safe and easy as possible. Using the AVM cameras together with sensors, radar and other advanced technology, JUKE’s Safety Shield incorporates a number of features engineered to make the car as safe as possible. These include Lane Departure Warning, Blind Spot Warning and Moving Object Detection, which gives visual and audible warnings to avoid potential collisions.

The final option opens a whole new world to Acenta and Tekna owners, literally. A large open-able glass panel allows not just daylight to flood into the cabin but also fresh air as required. When opened, the panel sits on top of the rear portion of the roof so as not to steal interior headroom. The glass panel measures 964mm wide by 837mm long to cover two thirds of the roof area. This is matched by an opening width of 693mm and an opening length of 301mm to add to the feeling of airiness in the cockpit.

Engines and drivetrains

Three engines are available for new JUKE in Europe, with changes to the two petrol options: one is new and the other extensively revised. The existing and acclaimed 1.5 dCi diesel with 110ps (81kW) continues unchanged.

The Alliance-developed 1.2-liter DIG-T petrol engine, which replaces the outgoing 117ps 1.6-liter unit, is an advanced turbocharged direct injection engine delivering 115ps (85kW) and generating 190Nm of torque.

Despite its modest size, the 1.2-liter (1197cc) turbocharged engine packs a real punch, offering sharper acceleration and greater torque (190Nm) for added flexibility than the outgoing 1.6-litrer naturally aspirated engine.

Its lower weight, standard automatic Stop/Start feature and more fuel-efficient operation translates into cleaner and more economical performance. The 1.2 DIG-T engine emits 126g/km* of CO2 and has a fuel consumption figure of 5.5 l/100km*.

The existing 1.6 DIG-T petrol unit has been further improved to deliver lower end torque below 2,000rpm. Producing 140kW, it is already Euro6 compliant with target emissions of 139g/km of CO2 for the 2WD versions. Among its new features are a higher combustion ratio (increased from 9.5 to 10.5:1), improved low friction technologies and cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation.

As well as a six-speed manual transmission, new JUKE 1.6 DIG-T 4WD is optionally available with a new Xtronic transmission gearbox, which further improves fuel efficiency, acceleration and all-round performance.

“New JUKE builds on the qualities that made the original such a success. Its unique crossover styling is even more energetic, and the interior makes a real statement.

“The new drivetrain options and advanced technology on offer to the driver keep new JUKE ahead of the rest,” said Guillaume Cartier.

As read from: Nissan Press Release

The New 2015 Nissan Versa Note

Competes with: Chevrolet Sonic, Ford Fiesta, Honda Fit
Looks like: The Versa Note you know, now with a sport-themed SR trim level
Drivetrain: 109-hp, 1.6-liter four-cylinder with five-speed manual or continuously variable automatic transmission; front-wheel drive
Hits dealerships: Spring 2014

Nissan’s value-oriented four-door hatchback gains two new trim levels for the 2015 model year: the performance-themed SR, which makes its debut at the 2014 Chicago Auto Show, and a top-of-the-line SL version. In addition to the new SR and SL trims, all Versa Notes gain standard Bluetooth connectivity for 2015.

More 2014 Chicago Auto Show Coverage

Pricing hasn’t been announced, but expect the new trims to be priced higher than the 2014 Versa Note SV, which starts at $16,800 including destination. The 2015 Versa Note hits dealerships in spring 2014.
Exterior

The new Versa Note SR gets a number of unique styling cues including a different grille, smoked headlights and fog lights with black and chrome trim. There’s also a new rear spoiler, 16-inch aluminum wheels with all-season tires and SR badges.
Interior

The SR’s cabin gains a number of cosmetic changes, too, including a leather-wrapped steering wheel that Nissan says is inspired by the automaker’s 370Z sports car, suedelike seats with orange accents, and piano-black and silver-colored trim. Standard SR features include six-way adjustable front seats and a CD stereo with an MP3 jack.

Nissan previously offered an SL Package for the 2014 Versa Note, but the new SL trim makes a number of otherwise-optional features standard. They include a 5-inch color screen, a backup camera, Bluetooth streaming audio, USB connectivity for portable devices, satellite radio, a height-adjustable cargo floor and NissanConnect Apps. NissanConnect Apps integrates smartphone-based apps like Facebook, Twitter and Pandora. Also standard are heated front seats, push-button start and Nissan’s Easy-Fill Tire Alert system.
Under the Hood

Despite the new SR trim level’s sport-themed appearance it uses the same engine as all the other Versa Note models: a 109-horsepower, 1.6-liter four-cylinder. Most versions of the hatchback team with a continuously variable automatic transmission, and with the CVT the Versa Note gets an EPA-estimated 31/40/35 mpg city/highway/combined.
Safety Features

Standard features include antilock brakes, an electronic stability system, traction control, side-impact airbags for the front seats and side curtain airbags.

As read on: http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2014/02/2015-nissan-versa-note-at-the-2014-chicago-auto-show.html

Nissan shows diesel-Frontier truck

Chicago — Nissan Motor Co. on Thursday showed off a concept diesel-powered version of its Frontier mid-size pickup at the Chicago Auto Show and said it will wait for feedback from customers before deciding whether to build it.

“It’s a technical study. We’re going to use social media — Facebook, Twitter, so forth and the blogosphere to find out what people are saying about this truck, ‘Do they like it? Do they want it? Should we build it?” and we’re going to let them decide for us, basically,” said Fred Diaz, senior vice president for sales and marketing at Nissan’s U.S. unit.

Last month, Diaz said the company was considering building a hybrid version of the next generation Frontier.

The demonstration Nissan Frontier Diesel Runner gets an estimated fuel economy increase of 35 percent over the current Frontier V6.

In August, Nissan announced it would sell a 5.0-liter turbo diesel V8 in the next-generation Titan full-size pickup, which will arrive in 2015.

“Frontier continues to be a huge success story for us, with more than 60,000 units sold in 2013,” Diaz said. “Nissan has always valued the mid-size pickup segment, and with this technical study project, we are looking to explore what is possible for the next-generation Frontier.”

This week, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV said its new 2014 Ram 1500 diesel pickup will earn a 28 miles-per-gallon highway rating, the best of any full-size half-ton pickup.

The 2013 Ram with a 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 gasoline engine earned a 25 mpg highway rating.

The smaller pickup segment has been shrinking, although General Motors Co. announced last month it was re-entering the segment — a market that Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV have both exited. GM also said it plans to sell a diesel version of its small Canyon and Colorado in the 2016 model year. The GM midsize trucks will go on sale this fall.

Sales in the segment fell 15 percent last year and are down by 75 percent over the last 15 years. Honda Motor Co. and Toyota Motor Corp. also both sell mid-size trucks.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140206/AUTO0104/302060118#ixzz2t7R55iUr