Archive for the ‘2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat’ Tag

Hellcat Challenger picks up 34whp with only a tune (video)

The 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat is the most powerful muscle car of all time, with a supercharged 6.2L Hellcat Hemi producing a bone chilling 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque, according to the official marketing materials.

From the time that the first media outlets got hold of the Hellcat Challenger, it looked as though the 707/650 figures were a bit underrated; and the owner of the 2015 Challenger SRT Hellcat in the video below wanted to see just how much power his new Mopar muscle car made in stock form, so he took it to a dyno shop for a baseline dyno run and for tuning – tuning which turned out some incredible numbers.

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The 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat shown below in Sublime Green is owned by Ohio resident John Michael Hansen. Mr. Hansen is no stranger to high performance vehicles; his current garage is occupied by a Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT, a built Lancer Evolution X, a built Nissan GTR, a built MKIV Toyota Supra, and a supercharged Ram 1500 SRT10.

Aside from the Jeep, all of John’s cars are modified and all of them are supercharged, so it should come as no surprise that this horsepower junkie was one of the first people in line when the 2015 Challenger Hellcat went on sale.

Once Mr. Hansen took delivery of his 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, he took it to Accelerated Performance to see just how much power it made in factory stock form. The 2015 Hellcat Challenger in the video below made 646 horsepower and 585lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels; considering the official power numbers of 707hp and 650lb-ft of torque at the crankshaft, Hansen’s Hellcat is losing only about 9% of the power between the engine and the wheels, which is a clear indication that the car is indeed underrated or that the Hellcat Challenger has an extremely efficient automatic transmission, as most self-shifting cars lose at least 12% of their power at the wheels.

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After getting a baseline dyno reading on his 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, John Michael Hansen had Torrie McPhail of Unleashed Tuning see how much extra power they could squeeze from the stock Hellcat. Using an HPTuners tuning tool, McPhail was able to increase the output at the wheels from 646hp and 585lb-ft of torque to 680 horsepower and 616 torque.

With no other modifications, simply tuning the stock computer to optimize performance allowed Mr. Hansen’s Hellcat Challenger to pick up 34 horsepower and 31 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels. Provided that we use the somewhat comical 9% drivetrain loss that we calculated above, this Challenger is making no less than 740 horsepower and 671 lb-ft of torque at the motor…from a car with no modifications and a simple engine computer tune.
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Those are high stock numbers to begin with, and amazing tuned numbers for the 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat; and with Mr. Hansen planning to do more to his new Mopar muscle car, we could see even bigger numbers from this Sublime beast in the coming months. In the meantime, crank up your speakers and fall in love with the roar of this tuned Hellcat on the dyno.

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Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/03/hellcat-challenger-picks-up-34whp-with-only-a-tune-video-28067

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2015 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 6.4L Automatic

The performance-car world has turned a corner. It’s a corner that, for a long time, those of us who savor engaging one’s left leg and right arm to shift gears have been reluctant to admit even exists: In most instances, no objective case can be made for choosing a manual over an automatic when it comes to performance. Automatic gearboxes have improved so much that oftentimes they are both more fuel-efficient and quicker than their manual counterparts. Curse you, technology!

The latest example of this reality is the 2015 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack, one of the more beastly muscle cars to ever have leapt from a Detroit-based engineering department. Sharing its naturally aspirated, 392-cubic-inch pushrod V-8 (Dodge likes to cite the displacement in cubic inches because heritage!) with the pricier, somewhat higher-tech SRT 392 model, the R/T Scat Pack comes with a choice of a six-speed Tremec TR6060 manual or, for $1400 more, an eight-speed paddle-shifted TorqueFlite automatic. We tested the manual version a few months ago, and that car also lost a three-way comparison test with a Ford Mustang GT and a Chevrolet Camaro SS 1LE, yet this Challenger impressed us with its brute force, bad-ass attitude, and ear-shredding exhaust note. The automatic version, it turns out, is actually quite satisfying to drive, too.

One Mississippi, Two Mississippi . . .

First, the numbers. We blasted to 60 mph in a blistering 4.2 seconds, hit triple-digit speeds in 9.6 seconds, and passed the quarter-mile mark in 12.6 seconds at 114 mph. The manual Scat Pack hit those same benchmarks in 4.4 seconds, 10.2 seconds, and 12.9 seconds at 113 mph. The improvement is in no part attributable to the Scat Pack’s programmable launch control, which is part of the standard Performance Pages app. Our test driver, senior editor Tony Quiroga, noted that, regardless of how low he set launch rpm using the system, some tenths were lost to excess wheelspin. The best way to launch, we found, is simply to ease into the throttle through first gear, dipping deeper as second engages and resisting the urge to mash the pedal until you’re midway through second gear. Otherwise, it’s a cloudy day in the neighborhood.

The transmission itself is a honey, as we’ve noted in our reviews of other vehicles that use it. Demure as a housecat in its default settings and bordering on violent in its more aggressive settings, the ZF-designed TorqueFlite eight-speed unit delivers satisfyingly quick and rev-matched downshifts at the tug of the left paddle. It’s not quite as speedy to swap ratios as a dual-clutch automatic, but it’s far from your typical slushbox. We give serious kudos to Dodge’s engineers for tuning this transmission to match the raucous personality of the Hemi underhood.

For what it’s worth, we expect that the launch control would come in handy on an actual drag strip, especially with slicks, but we test in conditions more like those you’d find in the real world. Still, 4.2 seconds to 60 is pretty damn good for a 4261-pound full-size two-door sedan—which is essentially what the Challenger is. Just as impressive are the Brembo brakes (with four-piston calipers at each corner), which yank the big guy down to a stop from 70 mph in just 154 feet.

The Scat Pack’s throttle is also quite touchy even with the powertrain in its most docile setting, regularly provoking the same wheelspin we experienced at the test track. This is less of a problem for us, but it becomes worrisome when we think about valets screeching backward into parking spots. And when the roads get slippery, well, suffice it to say that the Scat Pack is a fair-weather friend.

The Challenger Scat Pack can turn surprisingly well, too, thanks to quick steering (just 2.3 turns lock-to-lock) that can be dialed up both in terms of effort and feel via the Performance Pages. But be sure you know how to catch a slide before you turn off the stability control, as the 245/45 Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar tires generated 0.90 g of lateral grip on our skidpad; that’s a decent number, but it’s not so sticky that the rear won’t break loose fairly easily under power. Even when that happens, though, the body remains heroically flat thanks to a stiffened suspension. We noted moderate understeer on the level skidpad, but if you’re heading downhill on, say, a mountain road, it’s best to respect the fact that 55 percent of the car’s mass is riding over the front wheels—and that this Dodge is all too happy to push your line wide.

Adding It Up

While the automatic Scat Pack starts at $39,890, this particular example was loaded with options, including radar cruise control and other driving aids, navigation, a sunroof, upgraded speakers, and the $1995 Appearance group (including blackout trim, black 20-inch wheels, and bumblebee stripes). It also had a red-and-black faux-suede and leather interior that contrasted dramatically with its stormy gray paint.

The sticker thus had an eye-watering bottom-line price of $47,360, a few hundred bucks more than the $46,990 SRT 392. For that kind of coin, we might recommend stepping up to a basic SRT 392, if only to get the adjustable Bilstein shocks—they keep the car buttoned down in corners but also impart a far more highway-friendly ride. The 392 also has stronger brakes and comes with a complimentary day of driver training.

While the Challenger R/T Scat Pack is heavy no matter what transmission you choose, and the automatic is unlikely to change the car’s standing in the aforementioned comparison test, it is a very fast and charismatic muscle car that delivers on every promise made by its bodacious styling. We dig it.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2015-dodge-challenger-r-t-scat-pack-automatic-test-review

The NEW 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Officially Unveiled

Dodge has officially unveiled the most powerful vehicle to ever wear the Challenger name – the SRT Hellcat – complete with over 600 horsepower courtesy of a supercharged, 6.2-liter Hemi V8. It will be offered alongside the 485-hp Challenger SRT.

The new, force-induced V8 isn’t just the most powerful ever fitted to the Challenger, it’s the most powerful eight-cylinder Chrysler Group has ever built. Power figures aren’t finalized, so expect to see “over 600 hp” bandied about quite a lot. That fury will be channeled through either a six-speed manual or eight-speed automatic. Yes, over 600 ponies through an eight-speed auto. So far, the only vehicle we know of that delivers more output through that many gears is the as-yet untested Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Sadly, we don’t have performance metrics just yet, although if this thing can’t crack four seconds to 60 miles per hour, we’ll be pretty surprised.

As is the theme nowadays, the 2015 Challenger SRT features a number of driving modes, governing power output, shift speeds for the 8AT, steering effort, traction control settings and suspension settings. There are three pre-programmed options – Default, Sport and Track – and a Custom mode that allows drivers to mix and match to their heart’s content.

Like the Ford Mustang Boss 302, the SRT Hellcat will arrive with two keys, one red and one black. The red key is the one we want, as it unlocks the car’s full potential, while the black key is more or less a valet key, limiting output of that supercharged beast under the hood.

Both the SRT Hellcat and the lesser SRT model will ride on unique 20-inch alloys. An eight-spoke design, wrapped in either Goodyear Eagle RSA2 all-seasons or Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar tires, will be offered on the naturally aspirated model. The Hellcat and Track Pack-equipped SRT will get wider 20s and Y-plus-rated Pirelli PZero Nero tires. Corralling the SRT Hellcat’s 600 ponies will be the task of a set of 15.4-inch, two-piece Brembo brakes with six-piston calipers.

Finally, the SRT Hellcat’s extra oomph certainly demands some aesthetic tweaks. On the exterior, a Viper-like hood scoop dominates the head-on appearance of the 600-hp Challenger. That functional scoop is flanked by an equally functional set of air extractors, while the new vertical-split grille is a styling item borrowed from the 1971 Challenger. And in case all this visual aggression isn’t enough, Dodge has added a very, very conspicuous “SUPERCHARGED” badge to the Challenger Hellcat’s fenders.

Production of the most powerful Challenger will kick off during the third quarter of 2014 at Chrysler’s Brampton, Ontario factory. Expect pricing information to be released closer to launch. Take a look below for a video and the full press release on both the Challenger SRT and SRT Hellcat, and then hop up top for a gallery of images of the new tire-shredder.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2014/05/20/2015-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-official/

2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat

What It Is: The long-rumored 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat being put through its paces under gloomy skies. Wearing but tiny strips of camo on its front and rear fascias, Chrysler apparently feels that, since the 2015 Challenger update was revealed at the New York auto show, cloaking measures are no longer required for the Hellcat’s nearly identical exterior.

Unfortunately for them, our savvy photogs caught one in the wild, immediately zeroing in on the Hellcat’s telltale center-mounted and front-facing air-intake scoop. Even better, they managed to snag a shot with the Challenger’s hood raised, exposing the massive supercharger that, for those of a certain age, will likely bring to mind the “rat roaster” aftermarket intakes favored by brave Challenger Hemi owners during the pony car’s first go-round some 40 years ago. Sure the technology is completely different (with a distinct lack of carburetion), but evoking the past has been part of the modern Challenger’s appeal since day one. In addition to the Viper-esque hood scoop, it appears the Challenger Hellcat will pack the same revised front fascias, deep air dam, LED headlight halo, and taillamps as the rest of the Challenger lineup.

Why It Matters: The pony-car war is still on full boil, and Dodge needs to keep the Challenger interesting in the face of the redesigned 2015 Mustang and its forthcoming Shelby GT350 variant rumored to be packing a flat-plane “Voodoo” V-8. And then there are the Camaro ZL-1 and the Z/28. Bragging rights mean a lot in this segment, and if it takes forced induction to keep the Challenger relevant, you wont hear a whimper of complaint from us.

Platform: Nothing new here, the Challenger Hellcat is expected to soldier on with the same shortened LX platform as its siblings. We wouldn’t be surprised if Chrysler tweaked spring rates, dampers and bushings for Hellcat duty, and the bright-red Brembo calipers seen in the images appear to be a tad more substantial than those in current use.

Powertrain: Initial rumors pegged the Hellcat’s numbers somewhere just north of 600 horsepower and with 575 lb-ft of torque, but recent remarks made by SRT chief Ralph Gilles insinuated that the final number may top the 640-hp output of the V-10–powered Viper. The current 6.4-liter Hemi generates 470 horsepower and 470 lb-ft, and pushing the horsepower number beyond 600 via forced induction is the easy part; making it tractable and durable is where the work is done. Reports are that the Hemi will back up to a ZF-sourced eight-speed automatic.

Estimated Arrival and Price: Our latest intel has the 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat arriving in the third quarter of 2014 as 2015 model. Pricing is up in the air, but with the current Challenger SRT8 ringing in with an MSRP just south of $47,000, you can bet the Hellcat will be north of the $50K mark.

As read on: http://www.caranddriver.com/news/2015-dodge-challenger-hellcat-spy-photos-news