Archive for June, 2015|Monthly archive page

Cars & Pet Safety: How To Keep Dogs Safe In The Heat

Dogs are beloved pets that frequently travel with their owners on outings and everyday errands. But when the temperatures climb during the summer and early autumn months, exiting the car and leaving Fido behind can quickly become a deadly situation for the dog.

How bad could it get? Here are some examples of outside/inside closed automobile temperatures from Red Rover, citing a study by the Animal Protection Institute.

Outside, the temperature may be 82 degrees Fahrenheit at 9:00 a.m., but inside the car the reading could be 109 degrees. At noon, the outside temperature in summer could be 101 degrees. Inside the vehicle, it could soar to 119 degrees. At 2:30 p.m., when it’s 104 degrees outside, the car’s interior – where the dog is suffering – could reach 120 degrees.

Only 14 states have laws that specifically prohibit leaving an animal in a confined vehicle: Arizona, California, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and West Virginia. Numerous local ordinances also prohibit leaving animals in parked vehicles.

Signs of heatstroke in dogs

Warning signs that a dog may be suffering from heatstroke include: heavy panting, profuse salivation, rapid pulse, very red gums/tongue, lethargy, difficulty breathing, disorientation, stumbling or poor coordination, diarrhea or vomiting, collapse or loss of consciousness, seizure and respiratory arrest.

Dogs with short noses, such as Pugs, are more prone to heat illness, as are thick-coated dogs such as Pomeranians and Huskies. Other dogs more susceptible to heatstroke include the very old and very young, dogs with certain illnesses and those on some medications.

Tips for keeping dogs safe in cars in the heat

Common sense, along with state or local laws, dictates that dogs, other pets, and children never be left alone in parked cars – especially in the heat. If you opt to bring your dog with you in the car, take him with you when you exit the vehicle, even if it’s only for a few minutes. During hot days, car temperatures can soar in a matter of minutes, which could prove fatal for your pet.

If you won’t be able to bring the dog with you while you run errands, it’s better to leave him at home. Cracking a window does nothing to eliminate the risk. It’s just not safe for your dog alone in a parked vehicle.

Other ways to keep Fido safe and cool in the heat during car travel include:

– Place a weighted bowl with water in the car. It needs to be weighted so that the dog cannot knock it over.

– Carry extra water with you and give it to the doge frequently in small amounts.

– Groom the dog regularly to get rid of excessive hair. Long-haired dogs should get a haircut at the beginning of summer and later, as necessary.

– Dogs can get sunburned on noses and their ears. Ask the vet about a pet-safe sunscreen to protect those delicate areas.

If you see a dog in a parked car in obvious signs of distress, call the police immediately, say the experts, as the dog needs immediate medical attention.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/tips-article/1087535_cars-pet-safety-how-to-keep-dogs-safe-in-the-heat

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New Mopar Challenger Drag Pak

The 2016 Dodge / Mopar Challenger Drag Pak was unveiled today, boasting a choice of supercharged 354 Hemi or naturally aspirated 426 Hemi engines. The car is meant for racing only, and costs $99,426 for the 426 and $109,354 for the supercharged V8.

These drag racing cars are designed for the Sportsman class, and are race-ready. They are “designed to ignite the passion of the grass-roots car racers,” according to Mopar’s sales chief.

Dale Aldo from the Motorsports Marketing Team said that past Drag Paks (from 2011 on) have been successful, and that the cars were built to win races, not for on-road driving. They are the first supercharged Drag Paks.

They can cover the first 60 feet in just over a second, and do the quarter mile consistently in the eight-second range, and end up at 150 mph.

The supercharged engine uses a cast iron block with an aluminum cylinder head, a forged steel crankshaft, and a special calibration; it is based on the third generation Hemi and has the historic 354 cubic inch displacement.

The 426 uses an aluminum block and head, forged steel crankshaft, and special calibration. Supercharged cars have a blue graphics package, while 426 cars have a black package.

Improvements include a race-prepped automatic transmission, enhanced rear axle housing mounting scheme for better launches, 40-spline rear axles, redesigned NHRA-spec roll cage, Mopar gauge package, lightweight racing seats, hinged hood for one-person between-round maintenance, and integral tie-downs for easier trailering.

Ordering starts through Dodge dealers starting on July 23, 2015.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/06/new-mopar-challenger-drag-pak-29068

Is Your Check Engine Light On? Don’t Ignore it.

One of the most vital signals of an improperly functioning vehicle is the check engine light and when illuminated, it alerts the driver to a variety of existing potential problems. Vehicle check-ups during community car care events throughout the country reveal that the check engine light is on in nearly one out of ten vehicles, says the Car Care Council.

“When the check engine light comes on, it means that a vehicle system, such as the ignition, fuel injection or emission control, is not operating properly, even if the vehicle appears to be running normally,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “A glowing check engine light doesn”t mean you have to immediately pull the car to the side of the road, but it does mean you should get the car checked out as soon as possible. Ignoring the warning light could result in costly repairs. At the very least, the light could alert you to an engine problem that is negatively impacting fuel economy.”

Some common malfunctions that can cause the check engine light to illuminate include a faulty oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor, or spark plugs and wires. If the light flashes, the condition is more critical and must be checked immediately to prevent severe damage, which may include catalytic converter damage.

When scheduling service, make sure the automotive shop that examines your vehicle has professional technicians who are trained and certified in OBDII diagnosis and repair. The technician will connect your vehicle”s computer system to a diagnostic scan tool, which will provide trouble codes indicating why the check engine light was activated.

While the diagnostic tool is connected, the technician can analyze data streams such as the idle speed, throttle response, engine temperature, fuel system pressure, manifold vacuum, exhaust emission levels and many other key indicators. Once the problem is fixed, the car”s computer is reset to initiate the computer’s release process. The technician should then advise the customer of the proper course of action, potential warranty coverage, further testing if necessary and recommended repairs.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2013/07/is-your-check-engine-light-on-dont-ignore-it/

Is Your Car Making Your Allergies Worse?

Summer is in the air and with it comes pollen, dust and pollutants that are drawn inside vehicles through air conditioning and ventilation systems.

Cabin air filters clean the incoming air, removing allergens, and should be replaced regularly, says the Car Care Council.

“A dirty or clogged cabin air filter can cause contaminants to become so concentrated in the cabin that passengers actually breathe in more fumes and particles when riding in the car than when walking down the street,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “With allergy season quickly approaching, replacing the cabin air filter is a simple way for you and your passengers to breathe easier while driving.”

A restricted cabin air filter can cause musty odors in the vehicle and impair airflow in the HVAC system, possibly causing interior heating and cooling problems. Over time, the heater and air conditioner may also become damaged by corrosion. In addition to trapping pollen, bacteria, dust and exhaust gases, the cabin air filter prevents leaves, bugs and other debris from entering the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system.

Cabin air filters should not be cleaned and reinstalled. Instead, they should be replaced every 12,000 to 15,000 miles, or per the owner’s manual. Most filters are accessible through an access panel in the HVAC housing, which may be under the hood or in the interior of the car. An automotive service technician can help locate the cabin filter and replace it according to the vehicle’s owner manual. Some filters require basic hand tools to remove and install the replacement filter while others just require your hands.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2014/03/is-your-car-making-your-allergies-worse/

Four Symptoms of a Sick Cooling System

With the hot summer temperatures on the rise, knowing the symptoms of a sick cooling system are critical to your summer driving plans, since cooling system failure is a leading cause of vehicle breakdowns. The most noticeable symptoms are overheating, leaks, a sweet smell of antifreeze and repeatedly needing to add coolant, according to the Car Care Council.

“Neglecting your cooling system can result in serious damage and even complete engine failure, which would put a sudden end to your summer road trip,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “If the
cooling system doesn’t receive regular maintenance, it’s not a question of whether it will fail, but rather when it will fail. Performing regular checkups of belts, hoses, the water pump and fluids will ensure your car remains properly cooled and healthy for many miles down the road.”

The primary job of the engine’s cooling system is to remove the heat that is generated during the combustion process. The coolant temperature can be well over 200 degrees and that heat has to go somewhere, otherwise engine components are going to start failing. The key parts of the cooling system remove the heat from the engine and automatic transmission and dispel it to the air outside. The water pump circulates coolant through the engine. The coolant absorbs heat and returns it to the radiator where heat is dissipated. The thermostat regulates the coolant temperature to keep it consistent for efficient engine operation.

A major factor that affects the replacement of cooling system parts is the frequency of regular maintenance, such as coolant changes. Motorists should consult their owner’s manual for specific recommendations about how often to change antifreeze and flush the coolant system. A coolant flush and fill is basic to cooling system maintenance as new antifreeze helps the engine run cooler and a flush removes dirt or sediment that could damage other cooling system parts.

The coolant level should be checked regularly at the reservoir and motorists are reminded to NEVER open a hot radiator cap. If the coolant is low, a 50/50 mix of approved antifreeze and distilled water should be added.

Motorists can also do a visual inspection of hoses, belts and the radiator to help identify cooling system problems before they escalate. Radiator leaks, bulging hoses or frayed and cracked belts are clues that the cooling system is in need of maintenance.

Additional signs of cooling system problems include the vehicle temperature gauge rising near the danger zone, coolant leaks, steam or hissing sounds under the hood or the district smell of an engine that’s running hot.

The Car Care Council’s free personalized schedule and email reminder service is a simple way to help you take better care of your vehicle this summer and throughout the year. It is an easy-to-use resource designed to help you drive smart, save money and make informed decisions.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2014/06/four-symptoms-of-a-sick-cooling-system/

A/C Service: Keep Your Car Cool When Things Heat Up

Sitting in traffic when temperatures soar without a properly functioning air conditioning (A/C) system is the last place most drivers want to be. To help avoid this uncomfortable situation, the non-profit Car Care Council recommends that motorists be car care aware and have their A/C system checked annually to make sure it is working at peak performance when they need it most.

A vehicle’s heating, ventilating and air conditioning system (HVAC) keeps the interior cabin comfortable in any season by providing the right temperature and humidity level. Typical A/C service consists of the following steps:

– Service technician visually inspects hoses, lines, seals and other components for leaks as well as inspect the drive belt for cracks or damage.

– Technician checks pressures to test operation, refrigerant charge and outlet temperatures.

– If the system is found to be low on refrigerant, a leak test is performed to find the source of the leak.

– Keep in mind that if your vehicle is leaking refrigerant, it is damaging the ozone layer.

– Refrigerant may be added if necessary to “top off” the system, although some states do not allow “topping off.”

– A technician may also check for evidence of refrigerant cross-contamination, which is the mixing of refrigerants.

– A/C service should also include a check of the compressor’s drive belt and tension.

– The Car Care Council also recommends that when having a vehicle’s HVAC system inspected, the cabin air filter be checked to make sure air is flowing properly into the car.

“Making sure your A/C system is working properly will keep you cool and safe when you hit the road this summer,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

Read more at: http://www.carcare.org/2015/06/ac-service-keep-your-car-cool/

948TE Automatic for Minivans

Chrysler has been building the 948TE automatic for the Jeep Cherokee and Chrysler 200 for some time, regardless of whether they use four or six cylinder engines. The 948TE will also be used for minivans, Allpar has been told.

The 948TE is a heavier duty of the current nine-speed automatic, mainly engineered and designed by ZF, but altered and built by Chrysler. Mircea Gradu, Vice President of Powertrain, Transmission, and Driveline Engineering, said Chrysler “had a tremendous contribution … to the base development of the 9-speed.”

The first digit (9) is the number of gears, and the others (28 or 48) are the torque capacity in Nm/10. Thus, the 948TE should have 480 Nm of torque capacity, or around 354 lb-ft. This is far more than the Pentastar V6 produces.

A 928TE was also originally announced by the company but has not been used in the American Cherokee or 200.

There are reportedly changes to make the transmission fit into the minivans, which are to get both hybrid and all wheel drive versions, according to CEO Sergio Marchionne. Gear ratios range from 4.71 in first to 0.48 in ninth, an admirable spread.

Read more at: http://allparnews.com/index.php/2015/06/coming-soon-948te-automatic-for-minivans-29003

Next Nissan Z could be more like original 240

The current Nissan 370Z is six years old, meaning a replacement is on the horizon. But what will the next Z car be? In an interview at last weekend’s 24 Hours of Le Mans, Nissan Chief Creative Office Shiro Nakamura revealed that one idea for the next-generation Z could see it move down market, closer to the original 240Z or the 1999 Concept Z.

“We are studying a couple of different concepts. Because the sports car market is becoming smaller globally,” said Nakamura, “We would like to do something, I personally think, is more [in the] original concept of Z, which is … more practical and appealing to younger customers.” The original 1969 240Z, sold under the Datsun nameplate, became an icon thanks to a combination of attractive styling, reasonable performance, and affordable price. In 1970, a new 240Z went for less than $3,600 at the dealer, although high demand resulted in early resale values above retail.

In the US, the 240Z begat the 280Z in 1975. Subsequent versions grew in numerical name and performance, but that trend has an end point. The future path may be to reverse course, jokes Nakamura. “We are questioning ourselves in repeating the 350, 370. We don’t want to create 390Z, right?”

While Nissan is working on the next Z, the bad news is that the IDx is confirmed dead. First shown at the 2013 Tokyo Motor Show, the IDx concept was a vision of an affordable, four-seat sports car like original Nissan/Datsun 510. “I think IDx will not be produced,” said Nakamura, before continuing to say that the Z could fill that role.

Don’t expect a Mazda MX-5 Miata or Subaru BRZ/Scion FR-S clone. When asked specifically about the MX-5, the Nissan designer stated “We may not necessarily go into the same category. Personally I see other options that are very interesting. We want to do something the same as this, unique,” he said, referencing a picture of the GTR-LM racecar on the wall.

As for timing, we couldn’t get any specifics. And the chances of the Z moving down market aren’t even certain. “We still need time to finalize this,” said the Nissan chief designer, “I mean, we have a couple of ideas.”

Read more at: http://www.autoblog.com/2015/06/17/next-nissan-z-more-like-original-240z/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

Jeep Renegade Vs. Chevrolet Trax: Compare Cars

The subcompact SUV segment is expected to really take off this year, and two of the highest-volume new entries are likely to be the 2015 Chevrolet Trax and the 2015 Jeep Renegade.

Offered by all-American brands, they’re smaller than their “compact” siblings, the Chevy Equinox and Jeep Cherokee, respectively. But they offer two very different approaches to designing, packaging, and equipping the smallest all-wheel-drive utility vehicles you can buy from each carmaker.

While the 2015 Trax has Chevy design cues at the front end, it’s otherwise almost the generic small SUV. It’s not bad, just bland. The littlest Jeep, on the other hand, uses oversized design flourishes–big headlights, big wheel arches, numerous Jeep logos–to underscore its toughness even in a small package, to the point where it’s almost cartoonish.

Both vehicles are impressive inside, however, with comfortable seats, quiet rides on decent pavement, and a roster of the latest infotainment and electronic safety systems that would have been seen only in luxury cars not so many years ago. Neither of these vehicles is likely to be used off-road all that much, with the possible exception of the Renegade’s toughest Trailhawk model, so they’re tuned for on-road finesse and comfort.

Each comes as a base model with front-wheel drive, and offers all-wheel drive as an option. The Chevy Trax has only a single powertrain: a 1.4-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine, making 138 horsepower and paired to a six-speed automatic transmission. The Jeep Renegade, on the other hand, has two powertrains: its own 1.4-liter turbo four, putting out a stronger 160 hp, but mated only to a six-speed manual gearbox, or a 180-hp 2.4-liter four paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission. Both Jeep powertrains offer all-wheel drive as an option.

The Chevy is adequately powered, but not particularly quick; the Jeep is more powerful, but also heavier, and Fiat Chrysler’s engineers seem to have tamed their temperamental nine-speed automatic at last. We found the manual-gearbox Jeep more fun to drive and lighter on its toes, but in reality, most buyers will opt for the automatic.

Fuel economy ratings for the Trax are 29 mpg combined for the front-wheel-drive version, dropping to 27 mpg if you add all-wheel drive. Final ratings for the Jeep aren’t out yet.

The two small utes differ quite a lot in their packaging, however. Rather to our surprise, the Chevy Trax can hold four adult-sized people in reasonable comfort. Five is a very tight squeeze, and rear-seat riders will have to stagger their shoulders, but it’s definitely possible. The Jeep Renegade, on the other hand, has a smaller rear compartment that’s tight on knee room, and fitting four adults into its cabin will require negotiations to get the folks up front to sacrifice some of their own legroom.

The Jeep’s interior conveys ruggedness in its materials, shapes, and surfaces, while the Chevy is straightforward, practical, and adopts a number of clever convenience features from the Sonic subcompact on which it’s based. The Trax in particular has lots of trays, bins, cupholders, and the like to hold your gear. Both have front seats that can fold flat to carry long items diagonally.

Chevrolet has achieved top safety ratings for the Trax from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), which designated it a Top Safety Pick. It also earned five out of five stars overall from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), which gave it five stars in every category except rollover safety, where it received four stars. The Jeep Renegade hasn’t yet been rated by either group, though we expect it to get acceptable ratings at the very least.

In the end, both the 2015 Chevy Trax and the 2015 Jeep Renegade ended up with identical scores in our ranking system. The Jeep wins on styling and performance, the Chevy on features and safety. If rear-seat room is more important than styling panache, the Chevy is your choice; if toughness and design flair, plus optional off-roading ability (in the form of the Trailhawk model) are high on your list, the Jeep is it.

Either one is a modern and capable small utility that competes handily with any competitors of similar size. Both face a formidable challenge from the 2016 Honda HR-V, however.

Read more at: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1096943_jeep-renegade-vs-chevrolet-trax-compare-cars?fbfanpage

Flooding Safety Tips

Inland Flooding

Inland flooding is the leading weather-related cause of death in the United States. Every year, almost as many people die from flooding as from hurricanes, tornadoes and lightning combined. Most flood-related deaths and injuries could be avoided if people who come upon areas covered with water followed this simple advice:

TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN.

Inland flooding usually occurs during or after a heavy, slow-moving rain storm. But it also can result from strong coastal storms. Severe inland flooding can occur in areas that are hundreds of miles from the eye of a hurricane.

The reason that so many people drown during flooding is because few of them realize the incredible power of water. A mere six inches of fast-moving flood water can knock over an adult. It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away a vehicle. This includes pickups and SUVs.

If you come to an area that is covered with water, you will not know the depth of the water or the condition of the ground under the water. This is especially true during the dark, when your vision is more limited.

Play it smart, play it safe. Whether driving or walking, any time you come to a flooded road, TURN AROUND DON’T DROWN!

Flash Floods

Inland flooding that leads to drowning usually occurs during flash-flood conditions.

Flash floods are those that develop within six hours of a rain storm. That may sound like a lot of time, but severe flash floods can occur in a matter of minutes, depending on the intensity and duration of the rain, the topography of an area, and the condition of the soil and ground cover.

Nearly half of all flash-flood fatalities are vehicle-related. The majority of victims are males, but flood deaths affect people of both sexes and all age groups.

Anyone who has witnessed a flash flood can testify to the devastating power of fast-rushing water. Flash floods can roll boulders, uproot trees, destroy buildings and bridges, carry away vehicles and create deep new channels in the earth. Rapidly rising water can reach heights of 30 feet or more. Rain storms that trigger flash floods can also cause catastrophic mud slides.

PREPARE FOR A FLOOD DISASTER IN ADVANCE

We may not be able to control weather conditions, but with only a little bit of planning, we can take all possible precautions to ensure our personal safety and protect our homes from severe damage. Here are some measures you can take to safeguard your home and family:

– Find out how vulnerable your home is to flooding by determining the elevation of your property.

– Evaluate your insurance coverage once a year to make sure your home is fully covered. – As new construction grows in certain areas, more flood-plains are sometimes created.

– If your home is in a flood-prone area, contact the National Flood Insurance program to learn what mitigation measures you can take in advance.

– Contact your local emergency management agency to learn how to construct proper protective measures around your home.

– If you live in a flood-prone area, keep these materials on hand: sandbags, plywood, lumber, plastic sheeting, trash bags, shovels, work boots and gloves.

– Purchase a weather radio. These special, battery-operated radios cost as little as $20 and are available at many hardware and appliance stores and other retail outlets.

– Put together a disaster survival kit. Keep the following supplies near at hand and put them in a water-tight container: flashlight with extra batteries, battery-powered radio and weather radio, first aid kit, medicines, eyeglasses, drinking water, non-perishable foods, change of clothes, cash and credit cards, and copies of all important papers.

– Plan two evacuation routes in advance. Don’t wait until threatening weather conditions occur before trying to determine your route to safety. Be aware of streams, drainage channels and low areas in your region that are prone to flooding, so that your evacuation routes are not cut off.

– Do not park your vehicle near streams or rivers, especially during threatening weather conditions.

IF FLOODING OCCURS

Any time there is heavy rain in your area, be sure to follow these simple safety rules:

– Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for current and forecasted conditions in your area.

If flooding begins in your area, go to higher ground immediately.

When driving, always be aware that the road bed under flood waters may be severely damaged. NEVER drive through flooded roadways. Remember that it takes only two feet of water to carry away a vehicle, including pickups and SUVs.

When walking, do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Remember that it takes only six inches of rushing water to knock an adult off his feet.

If your vehicle stalls, get out immediately and go to higher ground.

Be extra cautious at night, when it is harder to see possible flood dangers.

These four words could save your life: TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN.

Hudgens said that after a flood sweeps through your community, keep yourself and your family safe:

Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Floodwaters pick up sewage and chemicals from roads, farms, factories and storage buildings. Spoiled food, flooded cosmetics and medicines are health hazards. When in doubt, throw them out.

Soaked carpeting and padding should be pulled up and discarded.

Look before you step. After a flood, the ground and floors are covered with debris including broken bottles and nails. Floors and stairs that have been covered with mud can be very slippery.

The use of large fans can speed the drying process and curtail the development of mold.

Drowning is the number one cause of flood deaths. Most of these drownings occur during flash floods. Six inches of rapidly moving water can knock you off your feet. If you must go through an area where water is standing, use a pole or stick to make sure that the ground is solid under the surface.

Do not drive through a flooded area. More people drown in their cars than anywhere else. Don’t drive around road barriers; the road or bridge may be washed out.

Stay away from power lines and electrical wires. Electrocution is also a major killer in floods. Electrical current can travel through water. Report downed power lines to your utility company or local emergency manager.

If the water level got so high that appliances were soaked, turn off your electricity until they can dry out. Some appliances, such as television sets, can shock you even after they have been unplugged. Don’t use appliances or motors that have gotten wet unless they have been taken apart, cleaned and dried.

Be alert for gas leaks. Use a flashlight to inspect for damage. Don’t smoke or use candles, lanterns or open flames unless you are sure that the gas has been turned off and the area has been aired out.

Carbon monoxide exhaust kills. Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machine outdoors. The same goes for camping stoves. Fumes from charcoal are especially deadly; if you must cook with charcoal, use it only outdoors.

Watch for animals, especially snakes. Small animals that have been flooded out of their homes may seek shelter in yours. Use a pole or stick to poke and turn items over and scare away small animals.

Are you covered for flood damage? Policies for mobile or manufactured homes may include coverage for flood damage, unlike standard home policies. Owners of traditional site-built homes can purchase federal flood coverage in addition to a standard homeowners policy. However, their community must participate in the federal National
Flood Insurance Program. A community cannot be covered unless it has joined the program.

Flood damage to automobiles is covered under the comprehensive portion of an auto policy.


Read more at: http://www.oci.ga.gov/consumerservice/SafetyTips-Flooding.aspx