Archive for February, 2015|Monthly archive page

Pics Or It Didn’t Happen – Trails End

You’ve just finished telling your friends about your latest wheeling adventure, complete with prolific arm gestures, impressive body language, graphic details, and your overall thoughts about the entire exploit. Dead silence. Then someone says, “pics or it didn’t happen.” Pics, you ask? That’s so three years ago. You got video. High-definition, kick-butt, can-almost-taste-the-dust video.

It wasn’t always this way. It used to be unusual to see video being recorded on the trail. Back in the day, we were the oddity (more than usual) when we showed up at the Telluride Rotary 4×4 Tour in Colorado with a rented VHS camcorder (it was one of the giant ones that rested on your shoulder and made you look like you worked for a television network). We were the only ones videotaping at obstacles, and even still, cameras were a rarity because this was prior to the widespread availability of cell phone cameras. We had several requests for copies of the tape, which we gladly provided after we figured out how to wire two VCRs together and waited for hours while the copying took place.

Nowadays, it’s common to see 4x4s outfitted with forward- and rear-facing waterproof high-definition cameras suction-cupped to the body or glass of the rigs.

A few years and a huge technology jump later, we returned to the Telluride Rotary 4×4 Tour with a Kodak DC50 digital camera at a time when digital cameras were a brand-new thing. The DC50 didn’t take video, required a cable to download, was held like a pair of binoculars, and was relatively large. But at least it was expensive. At the time, it was a cutting-edge piece of hardware that left people (and us) in awe. The filmless camera was quite the conversation piece as we used it on the trails to gather photos.

Technology waits for no one, and nowadays it seems everyone is packing a cell phone that can take a mega-megapixel photo or razor-sharp high-definition video. Often, we’re on the trail, standing between the crowd and an obstacle “working” and we’ll look one way and see a 4×4 doing its thing. We’ll turn the other way and scores of cellphones are pointed at the action. It’s an exciting time. It’s also an embarrassing time when we fall on the rocks and 75 people get it on video.

But now, the wheeling world has entered a new age where technology unrelated to vehicle performance has infused itself into off-roading. It’s probably the most exciting time yet for reliving our off-road adventures, and it’s the incredible growth of vehicle-mounted cameras. We see ’em at trailrides and events all the time. Nowadays, it’s common to see 4x4s outfitted with forward- and rear-facing waterproof high-definition cameras suction-cupped to the body or glass of the rigs. We’ve succumbed to the tech and run a small forward-facing dashcam in our Power Wagon all the time. It powers up when the truck starts and shuts off when the ignition is turned off. It has recorded our most heroic off-road moments—and our most stupid mistakes. And we just returned from driving a ’15 Ford F-150 that was equipped with cameras that allow a 360-degree view of the truck. Recording capability isn’t available on the system yet, but we see it coming. Soon, we may be able to check an option box that will outfit a 4×4 with the technology that will allow us to record everything that goes on in each direction as we wheel using factory-installed cameras.

Nowadays, video is on a tear, and the phrase should be “video or it didn’t happen.” Which leads us to this question: If you use a dedicated video recorder when you go wheeling, what kind do you use? Is it mounted inside or outside of your rig? Do you run more than one video camera? Where are you most likely to use the footage: social media, your club’s website, or just for personal use? What is the most amazing footage you’ve captured? Or, do you think recording video of off-roading is stupid?

From: http://www.fourwheeler.com/features/1503-pics-or-it-didnt-happen-trails-end/#ixzz3RRzQkAvD

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Winterizing Your Car

Winter is right around the corner. Depending on where you live, colder weather and shorter days will bring some driving challenges. Don’t wait to winterize your car if you haven’t done so yet. This is also a good time to prepare yourself for the need to change your driving habits with the change of seasons. A little preparation now can give you added confidence when things get slippery. For folks that know “winter is coming”, here is some advice on what you need to do right now for safe winter driving.

Winterizing Your Car Starts With This

An inspection. It’s a good idea to give your car a thorough inspection once or twice a year. There is no better time to do this than in the fall, before the cold weather sets in. Even if you live in a more moderate climate, the days are shorter in the winter months, so you will likely use your lights more often. That’s why looking over things like headlights and signal lights are a good idea. Many automotive service centers will do a comprehensive check for free. But even if it costs you a small fee, the safety value is priceless.

3

Check Antifreeze

Starting with the obvious, you need to make sure that your antifreeze has adequate freeze-protection for the climate. Properly mixed antifreeze also adds an important measure of corrosion protection to the car’s cooling system. The normal 50/50 ratio between water and antifreeze can get watered down if you’ve kept adding water when topping it off. Also, antifreeze should be changed periodically as needed (check your owner’s manual). A mechanic can use a simple antifreeze/coolant testing tool to quickly measure whether the concentration of antifreeze is adequate to protect your engine. If the recommendation is for a “flush and fill”, this is money well spent. It just might save your engine block from cracking due to water freezing inside.

Check Belts and Hoses

Also take a look at the belts and hoses, as a failure there can leave you stranded without warning. Look for any signs of cracking.

Check Tires

The next obvious thing is the tires. If you live in a region that requires it, a snow tire may need to be fitted for the season. If you live in the mountains, you may need to keep a set of tire-chains in your trunk. If not, you should make sure you have sufficient tread of the correct design for your climate.

Less Obvious Things to Check

Now for the not so obvious. When you are checking the cooling system, make sure the engine thermostat is working as designed. A malfunctioning thermostat can make a car overheat, but a lesser known problem in the winter is that it will take the car longer to warm up, making it uncomfortable to drive and causing a reduction in fuel economy.

While you are at it, make sure the defroster works. You never know how much you need a defroster until you miss it. Something that is easily overlooked is the windshield washer fluid. Properly mixed, it will not freeze, and it can be a vital aid for clearing the windshield.

With these things out of the way, a cursory check of the brakes, suspension, and lights is always a good idea. If your wipers are no longer up to the task, or you can’t remember the last time you changed them, go ahead and do it now. Better safe than sorry.

Winter Safety Tips: What to Keep in Your Trunk

It’s a good time to get some basic winter-related safety items in the trunk. This is another thing that varies by the driving conditions you may encounter, a basic list of winter safety items could include:

Flares

Blanket

Sand bag(s)

Shovel

Flashlight

Drinking water (leave room for freezing)

Non-perishable snacks

Ice scraper

First Aid Kit

Jumper cables

More Car Winterizing Tips

Here a few simple tips to make your winter driving easier:

A little smear of petroleum jelly on the door weatherstrips will help keep your doors from freezing shut.

A small shot of WD40 keeps door locks from freezing.
If your door lock does freeze, heat the metal key with a cigarette lighter before putting it in the lock to help thaw it out. Never force the key.

Pull your visors down to a vertical position when you run your defroster to help trap the warm air against the windshield.

Your floor mats can be a traction aid in an emergency. Place them in front of the drive wheels and slowly try and pull out, it works more often than not.

Read more at: http://www.carfax.com/blog/winterizing-your-car/

POLARIS ANNOUNCES SPECIAL FOX EDITION AND NEW RZRS IN LIMITED EDITION COLORS

As part of RZR’s continuing innovation and commitment to its enthusiasts, Polaris is announcing several new models featuring new paint schemes and graphics, and a new RZR XP 1000 EPS model with the first-ever Internal Bypass Shocks available on a side-by-side.

The new RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition is hands-down, the best performing suspension ever offered on a sport Side by Side, featuring highly-tuned FOX Podium® Internal Bypass Shocks, re-tuned coil-over springs, new front stabilizer bar and softer rear bar. The vehicle offers the next generation of suspension innovation that takes Razor Sharp Performance to a whole new level.

The new FOX Podium® Internal Bypass Shocks found on the RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition generates highly-progressive damping that gives the vehicle a plush ride with all the bottom-out resistance expected from an ultra-performance off-road vehicle. The shocks have large diameter bodies (3 in/7.6 cm rear, 2.5 in/6.4 cm front), reservoirs and increased fluid capacity for dramatic improvements in heat dissipation, fade resistance and durability. The internal bypass technology offers more zones than a conventional shock for better tenability and performance for the smoothest ride available on a side-by-side and better handling over a wider range of terrain at any speed.

To complement the new shock package, Polaris outfitted the RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition with redesigned coil-over springs. The progressive rate upper spring is a lighter-weight spring that absorbs small impacts while the stiffer, main spring maintains ground clearance and absorbs bigger impacts in rough terrain.   <BR><BR>

The RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition also is the first RZR XP to feature a front sway bar and also has a redesigned rear sway bar with 25 percent less stiffness. Combined with the FOX Podium Internal Bypass Shocks, the sway bars dramatically decrease body roll and improve vehicle handling and comfort.

Along with the new suspension package, the RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition features Matte Turbo Silver paint, cut and sew seats, new graphics package, innovative 6-Point harnesses and the Polaris Interactive Digital Display which is an integrated, industry-leading LCD display and gauge with full-featured GPS, mapping capability and compass. The display also features integrated Bluetooth functionality and shows the speedometer, tachometer, dual trip meters, odometer and maintenance warnings along with a digital clock, and operating conditions including fuel level and diagnostics.

The RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition will be available in dealerships starting in February 2015.

Along with the new RZR XP 1000 EPS FOX Edition, Polaris also is announcing several other new models with new paint scheme and graphics which include the following:

2015 RZR® 570 EPS Black Pearl

Additional features on this model include:

Electronic Power Steering
Engine Braking System (EBS)
TURF Mode
Sealed under hood storage
Maxxis Tires with Cast Aluminum Rims
High / Low beam headlights
Black Pearl paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® 900 EPS Trail Blue Fire

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Engine Braking System (EBS)
TURF Mode
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
Cast Aluminum Rims
Blue Fire paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® 900 EPS Trail Gloss Nuclear Sunset

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Engine Braking System (EBS)
TURF Mode
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
Cast Aluminum Rims
Nuclear Sunset paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® S 900 EPS Voodoo Blue

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
High Performance Steering Wheel
Voodoo Blue paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® S 900 EPS Stealth Black

Electronic Power Steering
High Performance Close Ratio AWD
Driver’s Side Seat Slider
High Performance Steering Wheel
Stealth Black paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® XP 1000 EPS Stealth Black

Electronic Power Steering
Stealth Black paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® XP 1000 EPS Orange Madness

Electronic Power Steering
Orange Madness paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

2015 RZR® XP 4 1000 EPS White Lightning (Monochrome)

Electronic Power Steering
White Lightning paint
Custom graphics package
Custom cut & sew seats with RZR emblem
Color-matched painted front and rear suspension springs

All models will be available in dealerships starting in January.

Read more at: http://www.polaris.com/en-us/company/news-item.aspx?articleID=308

Avoid a Breakdown with a Belt Check

BETHESDA, Md., Feb. 3, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — You may not see them, or know much about them, but engine belts are always working to keep your vehicle moving. Losing a belt can mean immediate trouble for the engine and a breakdown for you. The Car Car Council recommends motorists “be car care aware” and review the owner’s manual to ensure that belts are inspected and replaced at the proper intervals.

A vehicle’s belts are essential to the cooling, air conditioning and charging systems of the engine. Serpentine belts are used to turn the water pump, alternator, power steering and air-conditioning compressor. Older cars use V-belts for various accessories and failure of this belt could strand a driver.

“You don’t want to be stranded because of a bad belt that could have been diagnosed with simple preventative maintenance,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “If the serpentine belt fails or breaks, the engine will fail to run and you may be stuck. The Car Care Council recommends replacing belts at specified intervals to save you from the hassle of a breakdown.”

Results of vehicle inspection events conducted around the country during National Car Care Month in April and Fall Car Care Month in October revealed that 12 percent of vehicles had belts in need of replacement.

Always check serpentine and V-belts for looseness and their overall condition. Replace V-belts when cracked, frayed, glazed or showing signs of excessive wear. Noise in the belt system is a sign of wear and the smell of burnt rubber can indicate a slipping belt. When changing a serpentine belt, it is important to check all the components in the serpentine system as tensioners and pulleys wear at the same rate as the belt and should be inspected.

Typical serpentine belt replacement is 60,000 to 90,000 miles. Typical V-belt replacement is 40,000 to 50,000 miles. Replace the timing belt per interval specified in the owner’s manual.

The non-profit Car Care Council has a free 80-page Car Care Guide for motorists that features several pages of information on the functionality of belts and when to replace them. Available in English and Spanish, the popular guide uses easy-to-understand everyday language rather than technical automotive jargon, fits easily in a glove box and can be ordered by visiting http://www.carcare.org/car-care-guide.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s popular Car Care Guide or for more information, visit http://www.carcare.org.

SOURCE Car Care Council

Read more at: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/avoid-a-breakdown-with-a-belt-check-300030056.html

AN AFTERNOON IN A DODGE CHALLENGER 6.4L SCAT PACK

I have a friend who gets press cars nearly every week. Sometimes the cars are pretty cool. Sometimes not so much. In any case, I’ve been patiently waiting and FINALLY he got something I was excited about. A 2015 Dodge Challenger 6.4L Scat Pack. Phantom Black. Nice.

Now all I needed to do was finagle a ride or two while he had the car.

When he found out he was getting a Scat Pack, he asked me about it. Not normally one to keep quiet about such things, this time I simply said, “You’ll like it.” Further attempts to gain information from me were met with the same reply. (In retrospect, I realize this was not the most charming way to earn the joyride I so deeply wanted.)

So he turned to the Internet and suddenly I heard, “4,200 pounds?!?!”

To this I chuckled and said, “It is a heavy car.” And it was on. I thought I would never hear the end of it.

Then, he drove the car.

Suddenly, the weight was less of an issue. Instead, he told me how much he enjoyed driving this car. He liked the interior—both the spaciousness and the quality. The technology is advanced, yet easy to use. (Uconnect is definitely one of his new favorite toys.) Everything is available at the touch of a button without being overly complicated.

The Challenger Scat Pack doesn’t make apologies for what it is. Nor does it pretend to be something it’s not. It is a big, heavy, powerful car and it handles as such. Carrying 52 percent of its weight in the front, it does require a skilled driver. As my friend put it, you can’t be lazy when you’re driving it or you’ll find yourself in trouble.

Of course, a skilled driver in a controlled environment can also have some serious fun in this car. Spin outs, 360s, a little bit of showboating … entertaining and impressive to those watching and, of course, all in good fun.

The look of Phantom Black is menacing. Put together with the throaty exhaust note and this car got plenty of attention. I have to admit one of my favorite parts about riding in the car was watching all of the other American muscle cars slowly roll up next to us at stoplights. It was great to look over and see the other drivers checking out the car. (I swear I’ve never seen as many Camaros as I did the afternoon we were out driving the Scat.) Maybe a little less so when it was a member of law enforcement doing the same.

As read on: http://chryslercapital.com/blog/an-afternoon-in-a-dodge-challenger-6-4l-scat-pack-no-apologies-just-fun?utm_source=Chrysler+Capital&utm_medium=email&utm_content=read_more_2&utm_campaign=CC-CUST-NEWS_BestofBlog_Feb%20(1)

US gas prices may climb back up in mid-February

Valentine’s Day may not bring a whole lot of love to those headed to the fuel pumps. Gas prices may start rising by the middle of February as oil companies switch over to the so-called “summer blend” of gas, Willits News says, citing an analyst for GasBuddy.com. That blend is better for the environment, but is also more expensive to produce.

San Francisco’s ABC news affiliate, citing a Lundberg poll, also said wholesale fuel prices may spike within a couple of weeks. That city is particularly concerned because, even though the rest of the US is enjoying cheaper gas, San Francisco’s fuel has the highest gas prices in the continental US.

That said, predicting gas prices can be like predicting the weather, says the Christian Science Monitor. Obviously, simple supply and demand come into play, and demand has been down because of more fuel-efficient US cars and lower demand from Asia, while North American crude supply is up.

US gas prices have held steady at about $2.04 a gallon for the past week, though are down about 25 cents from a month ago, according to AAA. Gas prices, which are at a five-year low, averaged $3.28 a gallon a year ago.

As read on: http://www.autoblog.com/2015/01/30/us-gas-prices-may-climb-back-up-in-mid-february/?ncid=edlinkusauto00000016

The configurator tool on Jeep.com now includes the 2015 Renegade, providing every detail on pricing for the sporty little SUV. We brought you the basic pricing when it was announced at the media first drive two weeks back, but with the arrival of the “build your own” option on the Jeep website, we know exactly how much it will cost you to buy your ideal 2015 Renegade.

The destination charge, not included in the prices below, is $995 in the 48 states, across the board. All but Trailhawk are front wheel drive, with AWD being a $2,000 option.
First up is the Renegade Sport; it includes your choice of two black or black-and-sandstorm interiors and nine paints (white, black, Colorado Red, Commando, Glacier Metallic, Mojave Sand, Omaha Orange, Sierra Blue, and Solar Yellow).
The 1.4L turbocharged 4-cylinder mated to the 6-speed manual transmission is standard, but opting up to the 2.4L 4-cylinder and the 9-speed automatic transmission on either the FWD or AWD Renegade Sport raises the price by $1,200.

Standalone options for the Jeep Renegade Sport include a backup camera ($195), 16 inch aluminum wheels instead of the 16 inch steel wheels ($595), black side roof rails ($195), a full size spare tire ($195), and the MySky fixed removable roof system ($1,095).
Option packages include the $695 Sound Group, which adds a five inch touchscreen, 6 speakers, a GPS antenna, integrated voice controls with Bluetooth, a remote USB port, Sirius satellite radio and the UConnect 5.0 system while the $1,495 Power and Air Group adds Air Conditioning, Power Heated Mirrors and cruise control.

The 2015 Jeep Renegade Latitude starts at $21,295; upgrading from the base manual/1.4 engine to the automatic/2.4 costs $1,400, but includes 17 inch aluminum wheels. Colors are the same except for one more interior skin, “Bark Brown and Ski Gray.”

Standalone options for the Renegade Latitude include the interior tonneau cover ($75), remote start ($200), keyless entry ($295), navigation ($1,245), 18 inch aluminum wheels ($595), a full size spare ($195), a black painted roof ($495), the MySky fixed removable roof ($1,095) and the MySky retracting roof ($1,395).

There are four option packages for the 2015 Renegade Latitude. The $545 Cold Weather Group adds heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, a windshield wiper de-icer and floor mats. The $595 Safety and Security Group includes Blind Spot and Cross Path Detection and a Security Alarm. The $795 Popular Equipment Group adds a 115 volt power outlet, a 40/20/40 split rear seat, 9 amplified speakers with a suibwoofer, dual zone climate control and 8-way power driver’s seat control with a 4-way manual passenger’s seat. The $995 Advanced Technology Group adds Forward Collision Warning, Lane Departure, and rear parking assistance. Finally the Trailer Tow package, available only on AWD cars, adds $495 to the final price.

Buyers who want more luxury can opt for the Renegade Limited, which starts at $24,795, with a standard 2.4L engine and 9-speed automatic. There are two interior options, both leather: black, and Bark Brown and Ski Gray. Colors are white, black, Colorado Red, Commando, Glacier Metallic, Mojave Sand, and Sierra Blue.

Standalone interior options for the 2015 Renegade Limited include the tonneau ($75), keyless entry ($295), a 9-speaker system with a subwoofer ($495) and navigation ($1,245), while exterior options include 18 inch polished aluminum wheels, ($395), a full size spare ($195) and the MySky retracting roof ($1,395).

The Renegade Limited is so heavily appointed in standard form that there are only three option packages, the Safety and Security Group, the Advanced Technology Group, and the Trailer Tow Package (4WD only). Safety and Security costs $595 and adds Keyless Entry and Remote Start, while the Advanced Technology packages costs $995 and includes Forward Collision Warning, Lane Departure. and the ParkSense rear parking assist system. Finally, the Trailer Tow package, for AWD only, adds $495 to the final price.

The package for those who want off-road prowess is Renegade Trailhawk, starting at $25,995 including AWD, 2.4L engine, and 9-speed automatic transmission. It only comes with black interiors, but has all nine exterior colors offered, including a unique Anvil.

Standalone options are the tonneau ($75), remote start ($200), keyless entry ($295), 9 amplified speakers with a subwoofer ($495), and navigation ($1,245). Standalone exterior options include the black hood decal ($150) the fixed MySky roof ($1,095) and the retractable MySky roof ($1,395).

Renegade Trailhawk has five option packages. The first is the $395 Trailer Tow Group which adds a hitch receiver along with a 4-pin and 7-pin harness plug assembly. Next is the Cold Weather Group which costs $495 and adds heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, and a windshield wiper de-icer system. The $595 Safety and Security Group adds Blind Spot and Cross Path Detection and a security alarm. The $745 Popular Equipment Group for the Renegade Trailhawk adds a 40/20/40 split rear seat, the 9-speaker system, dual zone climate control, and an 8-way power driver’s seat with 4-way lumbar adjustment.

Finally, for 2015 Renegade Trailhawk buyers who want their off-road read beast to be as luxurious as possible, we have the $1,495 Trailhawk Premium Group. This adds black leather seats, the 40/20/40 split rear seat, dual zone climate control, heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, the power driver’s seat and the windshield wiper de-icer. The Trailhawk Premium package also comes with the Remote Start and Keyless Entry systems, adding on another $495 and effectively bringing the price of this top of the line option package to $1,990.

Read the full article on: http://www.allpar.com/news/index.php/2015/02/full-pricing-for-the-jeep-renegade

Why do Car Seats Expire?

This may come as a shock to some drivers, though hopefully NOT ones with kids. Believe it or not children’s car seats actually have expiration dates, though not because they’re made of dairy products or tuna salad.

Just like that tub of sour cream buried in the back of your fridge, the one that’s lived through four power outages and gone undiscovered for the better part of a year, child seats go bad. “Most or all car-seat manufacturers have an expiration date,” said Chad Sparling, director of engineering for Recaro Child Safety. Typically they’re printed on a label or molded into the plastic on the bottom of the seat he said.

The lifespan for child seats typically ranges between six and 10 years. Simple boosters will generally last for a decade while more complicated units designed for infants and babies are rated for less time.

Curiously these expiration dates are not required. “The government does not mandate but they recommend six years,” Sparling said. Car-seat manufacturers are really the ones pushing expiration dates. Naturally this boosts sales but their motivation for it is not without merit.

There are actually a several reasons why seats expire, not the least of which is that engineering improvements and safety regulations are always changing. “Basically you want to make sure you’ve got the latest and greatest when you’re using it for your child,” Sparling said.

Beyond the relentless pace of innovation baby boosters just wear out plain and simple. “Most car seats are made from plastic, which works very well,” he said.

But over time, this material can fatigue and start to crack, severely hampering the seat’s ability to protect your child in an accident. Depending on the climate, “It can see a really cold day and it can see a really hot day … The same seat is used in both instances.” This can accelerate plastic’s degradation.

And extreme temperatures aren’t the only things car seats have to deal with. Sparling said if you’re using the seat every day with numerous installations or constantly driving over rough terrain this can cause issues as well. With heavy-duty use you may want to replace your child’s car seat more frequently.

Seats should also be discarded if they’ve ever been in a crash, even a minor one. Sparling said, “NHTSA allows you to [re]use a seat if the vehicle can be driven away from the accident,” though he does not recommend this.

But what about used car seats, is it ok to put your child in one? Not surprisingly Sparling said, “The answer to that is no.” You do not want to purchase a second-hand seat because you have no idea whether it’s been handled improperly or in an accident, so avoid that screaming deal at your local Salvation Army. It may save you some money but is it really worth the risk?

What to Look for in a Child Seat

When shopping for a car seat it’s important to look for one that encourages a good pre-crash position. If your child fits comfortably in the seat they’ll be less likely to squirm around plus they’ll probably be a lot less likely to cry.

Sparling said, “We try to add innovation to the seat,” including things like no-twist harnesses so it’s easier to strap a child in. Recaro also emphasizes full-body side-impact protection. Generous bolsters on their seats help shield children during transverse crashes. This is an innovation that comes straight from the firm’s racing heritage.

Memory foam for enhanced comfort, ventilated seat shells to keep kiddies cool and easy-to-install designs are other Recaro engineering highlights. For added peace of mind their seats are also assembled in the United States.

“You always want the best of the best,” said Sparling. Make sure the seats your children ride in have not expired.

Read more at: http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2014/09/why-do-car-seats-expire.html